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Harken Young 88 Nationals

Feb 21 2017 03:45 PM | island time in Articles

Harken Young 88 National Champs move forward.
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The ever evergreen Young 88 National Championships will take place at the earlier date of 4th and 5th March 2017 with the continued support of Harken.
After several years of light conditions in April, the aim is to have a better chance of moderate sea breezes for this battle of New Zealand’s largest keelboat class.
Last year’s 1st and 2nd place boats changing hands during the year the National Championship trophy, and owner driver Tanaka Cup is wide open. Slipstream 3 has been in solid form and will be campaigned by Mark Bond fresh from the Stewart 34 class, and Flash Gordon by Roger Eaton and James Corbett is gathering speed quickly. On current form alone Zane Gifford with ‘Raging Hormones’ after missing driving the 2016 event will be favourites along with the current North Sails Sprints series leaders, Rick Hackett’s ‘Skitzo’ campaigned by David Hazard. Ed Masseys ‘Undercover has been very consistent so may threaten the podium and one of the Half Moon Bay crowd could be the surprise package. As late entries will be accepted up until 2nd March 2017 there could be further strong challenging teams yet to show their hands.
The 2017 regatta will once again be held in the unobstructed area of the old Americas Cup course of East Coast Bays and will utilize the internationally qualified race management team from the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron. On the water umpires will keep this very competitive fleet on the right side of the race rules with a maximum crew weight rule equalizing the 88’s righting moment.
Off the water the RNZYS will host the prize-giving in their Quarterdeck Restaurant and we will relive the action with visual prowess from our friends at Live Sail Die.
The Young 88, about 30 feet in length and with a fractional rig, is a popular multipurpose boat that offers speed and agility for racing, with space and comfort for cruising. The first mould was built by Roger Land in the 1980s, and since then 158 have been built. Of these, 77 are still in the Auckland area, 9 in Northland, 13 in the rest of the North Island, 19 in the South Island, and 38 have been exported. The National Champs are contested annually along with the Tanaka Cup for first owner-driver, an Owner’s Champs, Shorthanded, and Twilight series being just examples of this active class.
For all the event documents visit:
http://www.rnzys.org.nz/sailing-events/harken-young-88-national-championships/
Find out more about the Young 88 Class:

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Marsden Cove Marina Route 66

Feb 09 2017 02:37 PM | island time in Articles

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The Marsden Cove Marina Route 66 is Richmond Yacht Club’s ‘short’ coastal race – 66nm from Auckland to Marsden Cove, Whangarei. Organised in association with Onerahi YC, the race includes open keeler, multihull and the ‘Route 1′ singlehanded divisions. With a 9AM start you’ll finish Friday evening with time to join in the party at Marsden Cove Marina. It is a great introduction to coastal racing for new boats as the safety requirements are Cat 4+ and the fleet stays within the barrier islands. Berthage is provided at Marsden Cove. The marina can accommodate multihulls with ease!
Party, Breakfast, and Prizegiving?
The dock party after the race is always memorable, be sure to come up to join in the fun. Boats are encouraged to have a great time on arrival at Marsden Cove. OYC cooks up a fantastic breakfast starting at 7AM and the prizegiving follows soon after and all should be done by 9:30AM.


Party at Kawau Saturday Night?
After the success of the 2016 event, we are again planning a party for returning boats at Kawau Boating Club for Saturday night. Plan to sail to Bon Accord Harbour Saturday after the race and come up to the KBC for a good time that evening. Food, prizes, and a special menu for hungry sailors.


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KERIKERI to Vava’u Yacht Race 2017

Jan 26 2017 09:55 AM | island time in Articles

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See forum HERE for more info

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Womens Sailing - Equality

Oct 14 2016 09:31 AM | island time in Articles


It's time we updated those responsible for our fantastic sport.
This report below is a travesty in this day and age, and is also likely illegal! ISAF, get with the century!


The Coady family were members of Sandringham Yacht Club (SYC) in Melbourne, Australia. Atanosios Papantonio was the Boating Manager of SYC. He had previously made comments that Stephanie Coady should not be sailing a 49er. One week prior to the Sailing World Cup - Sail Melbourne 2014, he verbally abused Stephanie's father Paul Coady, while preparing Stephanie's boat and ordered her boat removed from SYC permanently. Atanosios was also the Professional Race Officer (PRO) for SWC Sail Melbourne 2014. Stephanie had previously completed an SYC form for boat storage and had been notified of approval for storage that year. She was training along with other Sail Melbourne competitors and, no other competitor was told to remove their boat.


Stephanie entered the SWC Sail Melbourne 2014 in the Olympic Class 49er. She completed all required paperwork and presented at registration and measuring as helm of the boat. Stephanie was known well by the PRO, the 49er IRO and 49er race officials. It was known that Stephanie had been training in the 49er for the SWC 2014. World Sailing also published on their website, sailing.org, an article on the event highlighting Stephanie competing against the men as an example of the diversity of the competitors.


Stephanie sailed the first day of racing and retired early due to a damaged spinnaker pole. Before the second day racing she and Paul were approached by the PRO (Atanosios) and told they were in violation of the gender rules in the Notice of Race (NOR). Paul explained that this was in violation of discrimination law. The PRO subsequently verbally abused Paul and Stephanie. The PRO was later joined by a member of the International Jury (IJ). Paul requested that a protest be lodged in accordance with the Racing Rules of Sailing (RRS) before any action was taken. This was agreed by the PRO. Paul also explained they would not sail if a protest was lodged. An email was immediately sent to the event organisers asserting Stephanie's rights under discrimination law.


After waiting for 2 hours, no protest was lodged, so Stephanie sailed to the race area. She was followed by members of the IJ in a boat. Stephanie was verbally abused by other competitors with foul language and yelled at to get of the course. The IJ were laughing at the abuse directed at Stephanie. Stephanie was 16 years old at the time. Upon returning from the days racing Paul was informed by race officials that Stephanie had been disqualified from the regatta.


Paul met with the Director of Sail Melbourne, Mark Turnbull, who suggested Stephanie continue to sail but without earning ISAF/World Sailing points. Paul agreed on the condition that results be recorded to ensure points could be earned in the event the decision to disqualify was unlawful. Mark agreed and stated he would just need to get approval from the IJ and Yachting Victoria.


The PRO and IJ organised a meeting that night with representatives from Yachting Victoria and Sandringham Yacht Club and race officials. Stephanie and Paul were not invited. Mark Turnbull was also not invited.


Paul was contacted that night and told that a meeting had been convened with the PRO, IJ, YV and SYC and, that all parties were in agreement and confident the matter would be resolved. Paul was also informed that a protest had been lodged as he had requested and that he was required to attend a meeting that night. Paul was subsequently ambushed, on his own, in a blatant kangaroo court. The IJ decided that by competing in a men's event with a female helm, he committed gross misconduct and brought the sport into disrepute. They also decided that the assertion of legal rights was a violation of rule 3 ("not to resort to any court of law or tribunal") of the RRS. Stephanie's boat was disqualified from the entire event.


Paul requested of SYC that Stephanie be allowed to sail her 49er free of discrimination in club sailing and be allowed to keep her boat at the club, as agreed. At the time approximately 100 boats were kept at the yard. All requests were denied and the Coady family were forced to cancel their membership.


Stephanie and Paul started federal legal action early 2014. World Sailing threatened that if Stephanie's case were to proceed they would cease Olympic class sailing in Australia. The Coadys stated their intention, if the threat was executed, to pursue World Sailing for the exclusion of women from the 49er class at SWC Sail Weymouth and Portland UK under similar provisions in UK legislation for discrimination in the supply of services. World Sailing stated by email that Stephanie was excluded from the 49er class at SWC Weymouth and Portland 2015 on the basis of her gender.


The case of discrimination is currently with the Federal Circuit Court of Australia.


World Sailing recently announced SWC events will no longer be held in Australia. Sail Melbourne has conducted Olympic class sailing under the Olympic sailing format for over a decade. World Sailing also announced a similar decision for Sail Weymouth and Portland UK. Australia is the #1 ranked country in the SWC for 2015/16 with 28 medals and Great Britain is the #2 ranked country with 22 medals.


At all times the Coady family have ensured that the best of legal advice and representation has been sought. Very thorough legal analysis has been undertaken before any claims have been made. The Coady family have been advised and represented by specialist discrimination lawyers including Peter Hull, James McDougall and Chris Ronalds. Paul Coady also holds a master's degree in commercial law.


Yachting Victoria sought no legal advice before disqualifying Stephanie in response to the formal complaint of discrimination.


The 49er Skiff


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The 49er skiff is a high performance two-handed (two person) sailing boat designed for crews weighing around 150 kgs. The 49er was selected as the men’s high performance two-handed boat for the 2000 Olympics. As a result of Olympic selection, the 49er also became a World Sailing (formerly International Sailing Federation) class with a World Championship regatta held every year. A series of Sailing World Cup regattas are also held in a number of Countries. The Sail Melbourne regatta is one of the Sailing World Cup regattas.
The two roles of the competitors on the boat are called the helm (skipper) and the crew. The crew is responsible for hoisting and lowering the spinnaker, controlling the spinnaker sheets (ropes), and balancing the boat. Due to the large sail area and spinnaker size, strength and stamina of the crew is important. The helm is responsible for steering of the boat. Strength and stamina of the helm is not a particular advantage. This has been established in other sports that involve steering for example harness racing, horse racing, monster truck racing, rally car driving etc where women compete with the men.
Stephanie Coady is the helm of a 49er. She sails with male crew due to no female crews being available. They entered into the Sail Melbourne regatta in December 2014 and were disqualified after the second day of sailing due to breach of the Olympic gender requirements for the men’s 49er class.
Mixed (male and female) crews have in the past competed in the Sailing World Cup regattas and the World Championship. One mixed crew was ranked 19 on the World rankings. Mixed crews have always been female helm and male crew.
The FX is a variation of the 49er designed for female crews around 120kgs. It is the same boat with a shorter mast and smaller sail area.


In 2012 a replacement was sought for the Olympic Women's Elliott 6m Match Racing class. The FX was selected as the women’s two-handed skiff for the 2016 Olympic Games replacing women’s match racing (http://www.sailing.o...lider_footer_01). The FX World Sailing class was included in the World Championships and the Sailing World Cup regattas.
No formal announcement or press release has ever been made by World Sailing detailing the exclusion of mixed crews from competing in the men’s 49er class. The World Sailing 49er class rules (http://www.sailing.o...pment/20102.php) do not exclude mixed crews: “The crew shall consist of two persons.”


Discrimination


The Sex Discrimination Act 1984 gives effect to Australia's obligations under the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (UNCEDAW) and certain aspects of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) Convention 156.


This case although made under provisions in the same legislation, has two separate components: a civil complaint of sex discrimination and, a criminal complaint of victimisation after the assertion of human rights.




Section 22(1) of the SDA provides:

  • (1) It is unlawful for a person who, whether for payment or not, provides goods or services, or makes facilities available, to discriminate against another person on the ground of the other person's sex, …:
  • (a) by refusing to provide the other person with those goods or services or to make those facilities available to the other person;
  • ( B) in the terms or conditions on which the first-mentioned person provides the other person with those goods or services or makes those facilities available to the other person; or
  • © in the manner in which the first-mentioned person provides the other person with those goods or services or makes those facilities available to the other person.


Yachting Victoria (YV) was the organising authority for SWC Sail Melbourne and responsible for the race officers and the International Jury. YV entered into contract with Stephanie to provide services for her to participate in the Sailing World Cup – Sail Melbourne in the 49er Men’s class. YV subsequently on the advice of the International Jury repudiated the contract without grounds, based on her gender.


Section 5(2) of the SDA details indirect discrimination where:


the discriminator imposes, or proposes to impose, a condition, requirement or practice that has, or is likely to have, the effect of disadvantaging persons of the same sex as the aggrieved person.


The gender based condition for eligibility to compete in the 49er class was impossible for Stephanie to comply with and, served no reasonable purpose for ensuring competition or served any other reasonable purpose. Stephanie had sought assistance from YV and the International 49er Association and was still unable to find a female crew. In contrast male crews are in abundance.


Victimisation


It is a strategy for discriminators to indirectly attack the victim by targeting others with a relationship with the victim. By doing this the discriminator is able to inflict damage on the victim while at the same time deny discriminating against the victim. Both the SDA and the UNCEDAW have provisions, for both the aggrieved person and third parties, for victimisation after asserting human rights.


Section 94(2) of the SDA sets out the criminal victimisation provisions which include if the Respondent/s subjects or threatens to subject another person to any detriment on the ground that the other person:


has reasonably asserted, or proposes to assert, any rights of the person or the rights of any other person under this Act or the Australian Human Rights Commission Act 1986.”



The assertion of rights under discrimination law was made both verbally and in writing before disqualification action was taken. So that the allegation could not be levelled against them in the future of discriminating against Stephanie directly, a meeting convened with the PRO, the IJ, SYC and YV, decided to target Paul Coady with a kangaroo court and disciplinary action based upon the gender of Stephanie. Subsequent victimisation consisted of a further 4 blatant kangaroo courts and a 12 month ban recently executed. The kangaroo courts were conducted without any remote consideration for natural justice and were based upon fabricated evidence, lies and exaggerations. More information is detailed in "the facts" section of this site.



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Jim Kilroy passed away

Oct 01 2016 08:07 AM | island time in Articles

From Sailing Anarchy:
kilroy was there
screen-shot-2016-09-30-at-12-20-39-pmBest known for his straight talk and perhaps the most beautiful ocean racing boat in history, Jim Kilroy died last night in hospice care according to multiple sources. The Alaska-born Californian became one of California’s most successful real estate owner/developers, but his passion for the sea never dimmed.

Jim’s memoir is a lot like the man; brash and honest with a touch of vainglory; buy a copy and read one of the most interesting sailing/business stories around; Jim donated all proceeds of that book to youth causes, including sailing.

Here’s one tribute from Aussie SA’er ‘recidivist’: “In the bar of the CYCA after a Southern Cross Cup race back in the early 70′s (in which race Ted Turner cheekily put American Eagle inside Kialoa on a mark rounding – without rights), Ted entered the bar to be greeted by Jim Kilroy lifting him off the ground by his shirtfront and saying “You ever try that again and you’ll have 2 fucking six-metres”. Jim put him back down and walked out.”

Here’s another, from ‘Hitchhiker’: When asked if maxi racing isn’t a rich man’s sport, Jim said, “No. there’s one rich man aboard and 25 poor men, and they enjoy it more than the rich man does!”

Share your own Kilroy and/or Kialoa stories, pics, or what have you in what should be a legendary thread about a legendary man.

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Costal Skipper Course

Aug 10 2016 05:02 PM | island time in Articles

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Coastal Skipper
(55 hours)
Aim: To gain a thorough grounding in the principles and practices of coastal navigation and an understanding of the causes and effects of coastal weather. An advanced course for those wishing to undertake coastal voyages.

Prerequisites: 16 years of age, Boatmaster, Marine VHF Radio Operator Certificate, 200 hours proven sea time.

Qualification: NZ Coastal Skipper Certificate.

Course Content: Comprehensive navigation techniques, meteorology, passage planning, assessment - written and oral.

1. Coastal Navigation
The nautical chart
Courses & bearings
Magnetism & the Magnetic compass
Fixing position
Tides & tidal streams
Allowance for set & drift
Marine radar
GPS


2. Coastal Weather
Marine forecasts & weather maps
Air masses, fronts & pressure systems
Clouds & fog
Terrain effects on weather
Sea, waves, & Swell.
Passage of systems over New Zealand


3. Passage Planning Assignment and Oral Assessment
3.1 Undertaken as an individual assignment:
Passage Planning
3.2 Tested or discussed at an oral assessment:
Collision regulations
Equipment & instruments
Ship-handling & stability
Emergencies and distress signals
Master's responsibilities and obligations

Course Fee: $785.00 per person (including exam fees) - additional resources are required for this course.
Summer special* - Coastguard Northern Region Members can book on the Coastal Skipper course listed below for $670.00 pp! Please book by phone during office hours on 0508 737 283 or e-mail education@coastguard.org.nz
*Only applies to Northern Region Members"


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King of the Strait

Jul 14 2016 07:38 PM | island time in Articles

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NZ Chart update

Jul 12 2016 10:16 AM | island time in Articles

11 July 2016

Nautical Almanac and latest chart updates

Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has published its latest Nautical Almanac, and released six updated charts.

Covering 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017 the New Zealand Nautical Almanac is an authoritative source of information for safe navigation in New Zealand waters. It contains astronomical information, tide predictions for ports, and information about navigation lights, as well as LINZ’s Annual Notices to Mariners.

“This is critical information for safety at sea, and compulsory for certain vessels,” says LINZ National Hydrographer Adam Greenland. “But we’d encourage all mariners to consider carrying a copy.”

LINZ has also updated charts covering the lower South Island as well as Gisborne:

· NZ 6422 (Approaches to Timaru)
· NZ 6433 (Approaches to Oamaru)
· NZ 681 (Approaches to Bluff and Riverton/Aparima)
· NZ 5571 (Poverty Bay and Approaches to Gisborne)
· NZ 661 (Approaches to Otago Harbour)
· NZ 7654 (Chalky and Preservation Inlets)

“These updates use the latest information gathered by surveying the sea floor, so you should make sure you update your chart portfolio if you’re in these areas.”

Both the Almanac and the latest paper chart updates are available from chart retailers. They can also be downloaded in several electronic formats from the LINZ website.

Information in the Nautical Almanac is updated through LINZ’s fortnightly Notice to Mariners service.

www.linz.govt.nz www.facebook.com/landinformationnz

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World Match Racing Tour

Jul 07 2016 01:54 PM | island time in Articles

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A Torrid Tale of Collision, Capsize, and the Charge of the Light Brigade
The Super 16 knock-out round of the World Championship Finals sizzled with excitement and controversy today, as the World Match Racing Tour heads for a climactic finale in Sweden.

Strong, northerly winds blowing across the island of Marstrand offered up a different race course and a different challenge from previous days. It brought out the best of some of the young Antipodean teams who have flown half way round the world for a shot at the $1 million bonus prize money for the winner of this event. The likes of Western Australia’s Sam Gilmour and Matt Jerwood might have thought their chances of the big prize were pretty slim, but on the evidence of today’s performances by the young sailors from Perth, they might just have a shot if the big breeze stays up.

Jerwood took his opening match against the highly rated Danish skipper, Nicolai Sehested, and then came within a hair’s breadth of taking a second win until a small tactical error at the final turning mark let Sehested off the hook. 1-1. Jerwood made amends with another win in the third match, taking it to match point. Once again in the fourth match Jerwood got the better of Sehested in the start and led to the bottom gate. But opting for the left-hand side of the first upwind leg put the Aussie at a disadvantage on port tack as they two boats converged at high speed on the first cross.

Too late, Jerwood realised he had nowhere to go as Sehested was on a collision course with right of way. The Dane bore away too late to avoid contact and bashed into the Aussie boat, ripping the carbon hiking rack clean away from the rest of the M32 catamaran. After a 30-second consultation between the umpires, Sehested was black flag disqualified for failing to avoid the collision and causing serious damage. The end of the race, and this evening both skippers went to the protest room to make their case, waited to hear their fate from the jury. For that reason, both Sehested and Jerwood were tight lipped about the detail of the incident. “Big crash, rack came off,” said Sehested. “It was a big hit,” agreed Jerwood, “and probably quite expensive.”

Yes indeed, both teams will be in sore need of getting further through the competition to cover their damage deposit before they can start counting what’s left for them to fly home with. The jury concluded that Jerwood be given 1 penalty point, and Sehested 2 points. This means the Australian still sits on match point tomorrow, while the Dane needs to win four straight matches in order to get to the Quarter Finals. A tough prospect for one of the favourites among the 20 international teams that have come to Marstrand.

Like his fellow Australian, Gilmour found himself in a commanding position over Hans Wallén and looked headed for the Quarter Finals until Gilmour and his crew fluffed their lines at the windward mark. Wallén had just snuck around the mark ahead of Gilmour who was slow out of a tack. “The wind came in strong, about 20 knots,” said the skipper. “We came round with not much speed at the top mark, we deployed the gennaker a bit early and the boat was straight over. There was no opportunity to bail out of it.”

Wallén may have wriggled free and won that match, but Gilmour is growing in confidence and still sits on match point. “We were leading every match and we just made some small errors; we are still at match point and the boys are sailing the boat really well. Every race we do, we feel like we’re faster.”

Another Swede that likes the high winds but failed to make much of an impact today against Phil Robertson was Nicklas Dackhammar. “Phil just had our number today,” said Dackhammar. “I did some bad starts and we got a penalty, we were against a great team and they really pushed hard today.”

As well as dominating the starts, Robertson was also very fast in the strong wind, partly because all four sailors on his team sit on the rack while every other skipper sits in on the hull. "Four on the rack,” said Robertson, “and we're off like a bridesmaid's nightie!" The wily Kiwi has spotted a loophole in the M32 class rule. “We were sailing the boat underweight at other events, so we dropped our crew weight to less than 300kg.” This is the magic number where lighter teams are permitted to have all the crew hiking on the outriggers, whereas most teams are operating at the crew maximum of 350kg, with the helm sitting inboard.

“We found people cleverer than us sailors, some proper mathematicians, to do the sums for us,” said Robertson. “They worked out that even with our lighter crew weight, we’d have more righting moment. About 10% more. And it felt pretty good today. We were fast against one of the fastest high-wind teams in the M32.” Some of the other crews are certainly grumbling about the legality of what Robertson has done, but no one has actually found the grounds to throw the book at him. With the breeze set to be strong on Thursday too, Robertson may prove a real handful, especially if he stays sharp in the pre-starts. Could this be the Charge of the Light Brigade?

In the other Super 16 match of the day, Chris Steele turned on the afterburners to beat Australia’s Steve Thomas 3-1.

The Sail-Offs took place earlier in the day, with Mattias Rahm dispatching the winner of the past four years in Marstrand, Bjorn Hansen, 2-0. All the other matches went 2-1, with Eric Monnin beating Evan Walker, Murray Jones beating Sally Barkow, and Johnie Berntsson beating Keith Swinton.

Thursday’s schedule sees the conclusion of the Super 16, with even stronger breeze on the Marstrand forecast.

Live coverage will be shown at www.wmrt.com from 1400 local Swedish time.



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Marstrand Results Day 3 - Sail Off
Group 1
1. Mattias Rahm (SWE), Rahm Racing - 2 pts
2. Björn Hansen (SWE), Nautiska Racing - 0 pts

Group 2
1. Eric Monnin (SUI), Albert Riele Swiss Match Race Team - 2 pts
2. Evan Walker (AUS), KA Match / CYCA - 1 pts

Group 3
1. Murray Jones (AUS), Full Bants Racing - 2 pts
2. Sally Barkow (USA), Team Magenta 32 - 1 pts

Group 4
1. Johnie Berntsson (SWE), Flux Team - 2 pts
2. Keith Swinton (AUS), Team Accure - 1 pts


Marstrand Results Day 3 - Super 16 Knockouts
Pair 5
1. Matt Jerwood (AUS), Redline Racing - 3 pts
2. Nicolai Sehested (DEN), TREFOR Matchracing - 1 pts

Pair 6
1. Chris Steele (NZL), 36 Below Racing - 3 pts
2. Steven Thomas (AUS), RPM Racing - 1 pts

Pair 7
1. Sam Gilmour (AUS), Neptune Racing - 2 pts
2. Hans Wallén (SWE), Wallén Racing - 1.25 pts

Pair 8
1. Phil Robertson (NZL), Phill Robertsson Racing - 3 pts
2. Nicklas Dackhammar (SWE), Essiq Racing - 0 pts



VIEW FULL RESULTS



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HIGH RES IMAGES (PW: wmrt)



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Platino Abandoned

Jun 14 2016 03:38 PM | island time in Articles

Remaining crew rescued from stricken yacht
14 June 2016 - 3.10pm
Two men and a woman have been rescued from their battered yacht, Platino, around 550 kilometres north of New Zealand by the crew of the container ship Southern Lily.

A rescue line was used to help get the trio safely on board around 3pm.

Meanwhile, an RNZAF P3 Orion resumed searching today for a fellow crewman, aged 63, lost overboard after the yacht sustained damage to its rigging yesterday morning. The aircraft subsequently took position above the two vessels later this morning, to provide support and communications during the rescue of the three crew from the Platino.

The Orion returned to the search for the missing man around 3pm, once the trio were safely on-board the Southern Lily.

The body of another man who died in the incident remains on board the abandoned yacht, as it could not be safely transferred in the difficult conditions with three metre swells. An EPIRB beacon has been activated on the yacht to aid in tracking its location.

The yacht was abandoned after its condition deteriorated overnight as it lost steering and began taking on water.

The Rescue Coordination Centre NZ (RCCNZ) is coordinating the rescue operation and search for the missing man.

RCCNZ search and rescue mission coordinator John Dickson praised the master and crew of the Southern Lily for what was a difficult operation.

“It was not easy to get the three crew members from the yacht to the much larger ship in those sea conditions – they’ve done a tremendous job.

“We are obviously disappointed that it was not safe to transfer the body of the deceased crew member, but safety must come first. We will keep track of the position of the yacht.

“The search for the missing person has now resumed and will continue until around nightfall when the aircraft must return to New Zealand.”

The Southern Lily is now resuming its voyage to Auckland - this will take about two days..


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