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Maritime NZ Collision report

May 16 2018 05:03 PM | Island Time in Articles

Not keeping proper look-out – collision on Waitematā Harbour
16 May 2018
In a second, unrelated, case less than a week apart, another skipper has admitted not keeping proper look-out and has been fined.
In this case Maritime NZ prosecuted Alan Schofield, who was the master of one of Fullers Group Limited’s Auckland ferries, Seaflyte. Seaflyte had collided with a recreational boat.
Mr Schofield was charged under the Maritime Transport Act. He pleaded guilty and was fined $2,000 in the Auckland District Court today.
Maritime NZ Northern Regional Manager Neil Rowarth said the skipper is legally responsible to ensure a vessel has a proper look-out at all times by all available means in the conditions – in this case it was a still night with a lot of light reflection on the water.
“On calm nights light reflection is a known risk in the inner harbour,” Mr Rowarth said.
“Many Auckland shipping operators’ have written this into their safety plans as a time when particular care is needed to prevent collisions on one of our busiest harbours.
“Ships’ lights and lights from land can reflect on the water and appear to be in more than one place.
“Skippers must be aware of this and keep proper look-out for the conditions.”
On the night of the collision, 11 September 2016, Seaflyte had left Auckland Basin at 8.10pm bound for Bayswater Marina. Mr Schofield, two crew and two passengers were on board.
The collision happened a few minutes later at about 8.13pm.
Mr Schofield did not see the recreational boat until the vessels were 15 metres apart. He put Seaflyte’s engines into full reverse in an unsuccessful attempt to avoid collision.
No one was injured on either vessel. There was extensive damage to the recreational boat and less serious damage to Seaflyte.
Immediately after the collision Mr Schofield helped the two people on board the recreational boat and contacted Auckland Harbour Control to report the incident.
The Act prohibits “Unnecessary danger caused by holder of maritime document” and also makes it mandatory to comply with Maritime Rules (sections 64 and 66 of the Act). The maritime document held by Mr Schofield was his qualification that allowed him to be the master on ferries. The relevant Maritime Rule is “22.5 Look-out”.
In the previous case, on Friday last week the skipper of fishing boat Lady Sarah was fined $2,000 by the Christchurch District Court. Lady Sarah ran aground at night on Kaitorete Spit near the entrance to Lake Ellesmere because no one was keeping proper look-out and no one was in the wheelhouse. Lady Sarah’s insurers subsequently declared the vessel a total loss.

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Navico /Cmap merger

Jul 03 2018 09:55 AM | Island Time in Articles


Navico® and C-MAP announce merger
On 2nd July 2018 / Navico




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Egersund, Norway – Navico – the world’s largest manufacturer of marine electronics and C-MAP – a leading supplier of digital navigation products to the recreational and commercial marine market – announced today that they have merged. Effective immediately, C-MAP will become another powerful brand in the Navico portfolio — alongside Lowrance®, Simrad® and B&G®. The merger will accelerate the companies’ shared ambition to create the world’s biggest digital marine ecosystem and deliver the best experiences for customers around the world. […]

Read more

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Safety At Sea Triple Series

Jun 20 2018 07:34 PM | Island Time in Articles

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NZ to host 2019 49er, 49erFX and Nacra 17 world...

Mar 14 2018 03:30 PM | Island Time in Articles

New Zealand to host 2019 49er, 49erFX and Nacra 17 world championships
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As many as 400 of the world’s best sailors will descend on Auckland, New Zealand, next year for the 49er, 49erFX and Nacra 17 world championships.

Alex Maloney and Molly Meech won the 2013 49erFX world championships and were third last year. Photo: Sailing Energy / World Sailing.
The event, which will be held at the Royal Akarana Yacht Club from November 29-December 8, 2019, will be an Olympic qualifier for countries who have not already secured a spot for the 2020 Olympics. It’s also likely to be used by many countries as a selection regatta for the Tokyo Games.
It’s already something Rio Olympics 49erFX silver medallists Alex Maloney and Molly Meech are targeting, along with New Zealand’s top Nacra 17 combinations Gemma Jones and Jason Saunders and Liv Mackay and Micah Wilkinson who are both inside the world’s top 10.
“The world championships are a big deal for Molly and I and we will be aiming to win it on home waters,” Maloney said. “It will be an amazing opportunity for the Kiwi sailors to showcase our sport at a high-level competition and it will be special to do it in front of our friends, family, sponsors and the public, including the next generation.”
It’s hoped four-time 49er world champions Peter Burling and Blair Tuke will compete, with the pair contemplating a defence of their 49er Olympic title in Tokyo in 2020, but they are presently focused on competing in the Volvo Ocean Race and will also be involved in the 2021 America’s Cup.
“It’s a great event and to have it on home turf is pretty special for the New Zealand sailors,” Tuke said. “Pete and I would love to be there but we’re still working that through with our coaches and will decide after the Volvo Ocean Race is completed.”
New Zealand last hosted an Olympic-class world championships in 2015 with the Finn Gold Cup at Takapuna, and Torbay hosted the 2016 Aon Youth Sailing World Championships.
Yachting New Zealand have indicated their interest in bringing top international events to this country and chief executive David Abercrombie said hosting the 49er, 49erFX and Nacra 17 world championships was another chance to grow the sport.
“This is a wonderful opportunity to showcase New Zealand’s yachting event delivery,” he said. “We learned a lot on the back of the 2016 Aon Youth Sailing World Championships and this will excite some of those kids and fast track their development into 49ers, 49erFXs and Nacra 17s.
“We’re looking forward to working closely with ATEED and the Royal Akarana Yacht Club. It will be great to deliver an event of this size as a first for the Hyundai Marine Sports Centre.”
Akarana’s new purpose-built 3000m2 Hyundai Marine Sports Centre is due to open in September and, located only 10 minutes from downtown Auckland, will be an ideal location for the 49er, 49erFX and Nacra 17 world championships.
“This is a great chance for our club to continue our high performance sailing tradition in skiffs and catamarans and to show off our new world-class Hyundai Marine Sports Centre,” Royal Akarana Yacht Club commodore Matt Woodley said. “We are very pleased to be delivering this event as a collaborative team effort from all yachting and marine sports community groups, including Yachting New Zealand, the local board, Auckland council and the class associations.”
Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED), on behalf of Auckland Council, have thrown their support behind the 2019 49er, 49erFX and Nacra 17 world championships and believe it will help build momentum towards the proposed 2021 America’s Cup.
“This builds on Auckland's international reputation as a world-class sailing event host city,” ATEED head of major events Stuart Turner said. “It will showcase Auckland’s beautiful Waitemata Harbour and get the next generation of Olympic sailors from the around the world out sailing on it. It will also support and lift the profile of our marine industry, particularly Auckland’s Olympic-class yacht-building expertise and capacity.”
Mackay Boats are world-renowned and since 2000 their boats have won 30 Olympic medals. It’s likely they will produce a number of new builds for the world championships.
International 49er and Nacra 17 class association president Marcus Spillane said it was appropriate they were bringing the world championships to New Zealand.
"We are delighted to be heading to Auckland and Royal Akarana Yacht Club for the 2019 49er, 49erFX and Nacra 17 world championships,” Spillane said. “It will be the first worlds that the 49er class has held in New Zealand and it is fitting given that many of our recent champions are Kiwis.
“These classes represent the best mix of sailing, and sailing at its best. We have seen our champions move on to the upper echelons of professional sailing in all the major events, and these events are the training ground for that greatness.
“We are excited for what will be an excellent event and, with the star power of Alex and Molly, Gemma and Jason and hopefully Peter and Blair, it is sure to be followed by sailing fans around the world.”
  • For more information, please contact Yachting New Zealand communications manager Michael Brown on +64 21 677 618 or michaelb@yachtingnz.org.nz.
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Route 66

Feb 21 2018 06:46 PM | Island Time in Articles

.So whos in??

https://www.facebook...53598508257155/

http://richmondyc.or...6-coastal-race/

or our Forum here;

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Garmin infringes Navico copyright

Sep 12 2017 09:07 AM | Island Time in Articles

Navico announced today that a Texas federal jury has found that Garmin willfully infringed two of Navico’s DownScan Imaging™ sonar patents resulting in $38,755,000 in damages to be paid by Garmin

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Pacific Search and rescue improvement

May 21 2017 10:24 AM | Island Time in Articles

Pacific leaders strengthen search and rescue

21 May 2017 (10:00 am)

Pacific search and rescue leaders are meeting in Auckland (May 22-26) to strengthen search and rescue (SAR) across the region and save lives.

Maritime NZ Director Keith Manch, who opens the conference on Monday, says it’s the first time New Zealand has hosted the Pacific SAR conference and he’s looking forward to meeting some of the 100 people from the 26 countries that are attending.

“We’re proud of the Rescue Coordination Centre NZ’s work throughout the Pacific helping to develop search and rescue capability and coordinating dozens of life-saving rescue missions with other agencies,” he said.

RCCNZ Manager Mike Hill said the Pacific region’s search and rescue agencies have to deal with the challenges of finding and rescuing people in what is the world’s biggest ocean.

“Management skills – like setting the search area, gathering information about the missing vessel and people and their last known movements – are key to life-saving rescues.”



“The focus of the conference is about improving regional and national collaboration and coordination with the ultimate goal to save lives in the Pacific,” says Thierry Nervale, the Deputy Director Transport of the Pacific Community – the organisation that supports development across the region.

Pacific SAR leaders and practitioners will build relationships, learn from each other, hear about new technology and share the best practice search and rescue techniques.

The conference is a cornerstone of a wider work programme led by the PACSAR Steering Committee – a collective of five nations (Australia, Fiji, France, New Zealand and the United States) to build capability and cooperation across the region.

Under PACSAR, RCCNZ has visited Pacific islands to help with planning and upskilling local search and rescue staff.

On Monday, each country will give an overview of SAR work in their area. On Tuesday, Pacific search and rescue capability strategy will be discussed. On Wednesday, from 2.30 pm there will be a dramatic “rescue” off Mechanics Bay simulating a sinking boat firing flares, a US Coastguard C-130 Hercules dropping a life raft, and an Auckland Rescue Helicopter winching a person from the water.

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Digby Taylor Memorial

May 17 2017 10:37 PM | Island Time in Articles

Memorial Celebration of the Life of Round the World Yachtsman, Digby Taylor

Ponsonby Cruising Club 18.00 Friday 26th May 2017
Official Introduction 18.30 – 19.00 and then the bar will be open

RSVP Please acknowledge your intention to attend on my Facebook page or by email

Mike Keeton
michaelkeeton@xtra.co.nz
021 500 151

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Harken Young 88 Nationals

Feb 21 2017 03:45 PM | Island Time in Articles

Harken Young 88 National Champs move forward.
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The ever evergreen Young 88 National Championships will take place at the earlier date of 4th and 5th March 2017 with the continued support of Harken.
After several years of light conditions in April, the aim is to have a better chance of moderate sea breezes for this battle of New Zealand’s largest keelboat class.
Last year’s 1st and 2nd place boats changing hands during the year the National Championship trophy, and owner driver Tanaka Cup is wide open. Slipstream 3 has been in solid form and will be campaigned by Mark Bond fresh from the Stewart 34 class, and Flash Gordon by Roger Eaton and James Corbett is gathering speed quickly. On current form alone Zane Gifford with ‘Raging Hormones’ after missing driving the 2016 event will be favourites along with the current North Sails Sprints series leaders, Rick Hackett’s ‘Skitzo’ campaigned by David Hazard. Ed Masseys ‘Undercover has been very consistent so may threaten the podium and one of the Half Moon Bay crowd could be the surprise package. As late entries will be accepted up until 2nd March 2017 there could be further strong challenging teams yet to show their hands.
The 2017 regatta will once again be held in the unobstructed area of the old Americas Cup course of East Coast Bays and will utilize the internationally qualified race management team from the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron. On the water umpires will keep this very competitive fleet on the right side of the race rules with a maximum crew weight rule equalizing the 88’s righting moment.
Off the water the RNZYS will host the prize-giving in their Quarterdeck Restaurant and we will relive the action with visual prowess from our friends at Live Sail Die.
The Young 88, about 30 feet in length and with a fractional rig, is a popular multipurpose boat that offers speed and agility for racing, with space and comfort for cruising. The first mould was built by Roger Land in the 1980s, and since then 158 have been built. Of these, 77 are still in the Auckland area, 9 in Northland, 13 in the rest of the North Island, 19 in the South Island, and 38 have been exported. The National Champs are contested annually along with the Tanaka Cup for first owner-driver, an Owner’s Champs, Shorthanded, and Twilight series being just examples of this active class.
For all the event documents visit:
http://www.rnzys.org.nz/sailing-events/harken-young-88-national-championships/
Find out more about the Young 88 Class:

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Marsden Cove Marina Route 66

Feb 09 2017 02:37 PM | Island Time in Articles

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The Marsden Cove Marina Route 66 is Richmond Yacht Club’s ‘short’ coastal race – 66nm from Auckland to Marsden Cove, Whangarei. Organised in association with Onerahi YC, the race includes open keeler, multihull and the ‘Route 1′ singlehanded divisions. With a 9AM start you’ll finish Friday evening with time to join in the party at Marsden Cove Marina. It is a great introduction to coastal racing for new boats as the safety requirements are Cat 4+ and the fleet stays within the barrier islands. Berthage is provided at Marsden Cove. The marina can accommodate multihulls with ease!
Party, Breakfast, and Prizegiving?
The dock party after the race is always memorable, be sure to come up to join in the fun. Boats are encouraged to have a great time on arrival at Marsden Cove. OYC cooks up a fantastic breakfast starting at 7AM and the prizegiving follows soon after and all should be done by 9:30AM.


Party at Kawau Saturday Night?
After the success of the 2016 event, we are again planning a party for returning boats at Kawau Boating Club for Saturday night. Plan to sail to Bon Accord Harbour Saturday after the race and come up to the KBC for a good time that evening. Food, prizes, and a special menu for hungry sailors.


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KERIKERI to Vava’u Yacht Race 2017

Jan 26 2017 09:55 AM | Island Time in Articles

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See forum HERE for more info

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Womens Sailing - Equality

Oct 14 2016 09:31 AM | Island Time in Articles


It's time we updated those responsible for our fantastic sport.
This report below is a travesty in this day and age, and is also likely illegal! ISAF, get with the century!


The Coady family were members of Sandringham Yacht Club (SYC) in Melbourne, Australia. Atanosios Papantonio was the Boating Manager of SYC. He had previously made comments that Stephanie Coady should not be sailing a 49er. One week prior to the Sailing World Cup - Sail Melbourne 2014, he verbally abused Stephanie's father Paul Coady, while preparing Stephanie's boat and ordered her boat removed from SYC permanently. Atanosios was also the Professional Race Officer (PRO) for SWC Sail Melbourne 2014. Stephanie had previously completed an SYC form for boat storage and had been notified of approval for storage that year. She was training along with other Sail Melbourne competitors and, no other competitor was told to remove their boat.


Stephanie entered the SWC Sail Melbourne 2014 in the Olympic Class 49er. She completed all required paperwork and presented at registration and measuring as helm of the boat. Stephanie was known well by the PRO, the 49er IRO and 49er race officials. It was known that Stephanie had been training in the 49er for the SWC 2014. World Sailing also published on their website, sailing.org, an article on the event highlighting Stephanie competing against the men as an example of the diversity of the competitors.


Stephanie sailed the first day of racing and retired early due to a damaged spinnaker pole. Before the second day racing she and Paul were approached by the PRO (Atanosios) and told they were in violation of the gender rules in the Notice of Race (NOR). Paul explained that this was in violation of discrimination law. The PRO subsequently verbally abused Paul and Stephanie. The PRO was later joined by a member of the International Jury (IJ). Paul requested that a protest be lodged in accordance with the Racing Rules of Sailing (RRS) before any action was taken. This was agreed by the PRO. Paul also explained they would not sail if a protest was lodged. An email was immediately sent to the event organisers asserting Stephanie's rights under discrimination law.


After waiting for 2 hours, no protest was lodged, so Stephanie sailed to the race area. She was followed by members of the IJ in a boat. Stephanie was verbally abused by other competitors with foul language and yelled at to get of the course. The IJ were laughing at the abuse directed at Stephanie. Stephanie was 16 years old at the time. Upon returning from the days racing Paul was informed by race officials that Stephanie had been disqualified from the regatta.


Paul met with the Director of Sail Melbourne, Mark Turnbull, who suggested Stephanie continue to sail but without earning ISAF/World Sailing points. Paul agreed on the condition that results be recorded to ensure points could be earned in the event the decision to disqualify was unlawful. Mark agreed and stated he would just need to get approval from the IJ and Yachting Victoria.


The PRO and IJ organised a meeting that night with representatives from Yachting Victoria and Sandringham Yacht Club and race officials. Stephanie and Paul were not invited. Mark Turnbull was also not invited.


Paul was contacted that night and told that a meeting had been convened with the PRO, IJ, YV and SYC and, that all parties were in agreement and confident the matter would be resolved. Paul was also informed that a protest had been lodged as he had requested and that he was required to attend a meeting that night. Paul was subsequently ambushed, on his own, in a blatant kangaroo court. The IJ decided that by competing in a men's event with a female helm, he committed gross misconduct and brought the sport into disrepute. They also decided that the assertion of legal rights was a violation of rule 3 ("not to resort to any court of law or tribunal") of the RRS. Stephanie's boat was disqualified from the entire event.


Paul requested of SYC that Stephanie be allowed to sail her 49er free of discrimination in club sailing and be allowed to keep her boat at the club, as agreed. At the time approximately 100 boats were kept at the yard. All requests were denied and the Coady family were forced to cancel their membership.


Stephanie and Paul started federal legal action early 2014. World Sailing threatened that if Stephanie's case were to proceed they would cease Olympic class sailing in Australia. The Coadys stated their intention, if the threat was executed, to pursue World Sailing for the exclusion of women from the 49er class at SWC Sail Weymouth and Portland UK under similar provisions in UK legislation for discrimination in the supply of services. World Sailing stated by email that Stephanie was excluded from the 49er class at SWC Weymouth and Portland 2015 on the basis of her gender.


The case of discrimination is currently with the Federal Circuit Court of Australia.


World Sailing recently announced SWC events will no longer be held in Australia. Sail Melbourne has conducted Olympic class sailing under the Olympic sailing format for over a decade. World Sailing also announced a similar decision for Sail Weymouth and Portland UK. Australia is the #1 ranked country in the SWC for 2015/16 with 28 medals and Great Britain is the #2 ranked country with 22 medals.


At all times the Coady family have ensured that the best of legal advice and representation has been sought. Very thorough legal analysis has been undertaken before any claims have been made. The Coady family have been advised and represented by specialist discrimination lawyers including Peter Hull, James McDougall and Chris Ronalds. Paul Coady also holds a master's degree in commercial law.


Yachting Victoria sought no legal advice before disqualifying Stephanie in response to the formal complaint of discrimination.


The 49er Skiff


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The 49er skiff is a high performance two-handed (two person) sailing boat designed for crews weighing around 150 kgs. The 49er was selected as the men’s high performance two-handed boat for the 2000 Olympics. As a result of Olympic selection, the 49er also became a World Sailing (formerly International Sailing Federation) class with a World Championship regatta held every year. A series of Sailing World Cup regattas are also held in a number of Countries. The Sail Melbourne regatta is one of the Sailing World Cup regattas.
The two roles of the competitors on the boat are called the helm (skipper) and the crew. The crew is responsible for hoisting and lowering the spinnaker, controlling the spinnaker sheets (ropes), and balancing the boat. Due to the large sail area and spinnaker size, strength and stamina of the crew is important. The helm is responsible for steering of the boat. Strength and stamina of the helm is not a particular advantage. This has been established in other sports that involve steering for example harness racing, horse racing, monster truck racing, rally car driving etc where women compete with the men.
Stephanie Coady is the helm of a 49er. She sails with male crew due to no female crews being available. They entered into the Sail Melbourne regatta in December 2014 and were disqualified after the second day of sailing due to breach of the Olympic gender requirements for the men’s 49er class.
Mixed (male and female) crews have in the past competed in the Sailing World Cup regattas and the World Championship. One mixed crew was ranked 19 on the World rankings. Mixed crews have always been female helm and male crew.
The FX is a variation of the 49er designed for female crews around 120kgs. It is the same boat with a shorter mast and smaller sail area.


In 2012 a replacement was sought for the Olympic Women's Elliott 6m Match Racing class. The FX was selected as the women’s two-handed skiff for the 2016 Olympic Games replacing women’s match racing (http://www.sailing.o...lider_footer_01). The FX World Sailing class was included in the World Championships and the Sailing World Cup regattas.
No formal announcement or press release has ever been made by World Sailing detailing the exclusion of mixed crews from competing in the men’s 49er class. The World Sailing 49er class rules (http://www.sailing.o...pment/20102.php) do not exclude mixed crews: “The crew shall consist of two persons.”


Discrimination


The Sex Discrimination Act 1984 gives effect to Australia's obligations under the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (UNCEDAW) and certain aspects of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) Convention 156.


This case although made under provisions in the same legislation, has two separate components: a civil complaint of sex discrimination and, a criminal complaint of victimisation after the assertion of human rights.




Section 22(1) of the SDA provides:

  • (1) It is unlawful for a person who, whether for payment or not, provides goods or services, or makes facilities available, to discriminate against another person on the ground of the other person's sex, …:
  • (a) by refusing to provide the other person with those goods or services or to make those facilities available to the other person;
  • ( B) in the terms or conditions on which the first-mentioned person provides the other person with those goods or services or makes those facilities available to the other person; or
  • © in the manner in which the first-mentioned person provides the other person with those goods or services or makes those facilities available to the other person.


Yachting Victoria (YV) was the organising authority for SWC Sail Melbourne and responsible for the race officers and the International Jury. YV entered into contract with Stephanie to provide services for her to participate in the Sailing World Cup – Sail Melbourne in the 49er Men’s class. YV subsequently on the advice of the International Jury repudiated the contract without grounds, based on her gender.


Section 5(2) of the SDA details indirect discrimination where:


the discriminator imposes, or proposes to impose, a condition, requirement or practice that has, or is likely to have, the effect of disadvantaging persons of the same sex as the aggrieved person.


The gender based condition for eligibility to compete in the 49er class was impossible for Stephanie to comply with and, served no reasonable purpose for ensuring competition or served any other reasonable purpose. Stephanie had sought assistance from YV and the International 49er Association and was still unable to find a female crew. In contrast male crews are in abundance.


Victimisation


It is a strategy for discriminators to indirectly attack the victim by targeting others with a relationship with the victim. By doing this the discriminator is able to inflict damage on the victim while at the same time deny discriminating against the victim. Both the SDA and the UNCEDAW have provisions, for both the aggrieved person and third parties, for victimisation after asserting human rights.


Section 94(2) of the SDA sets out the criminal victimisation provisions which include if the Respondent/s subjects or threatens to subject another person to any detriment on the ground that the other person:


has reasonably asserted, or proposes to assert, any rights of the person or the rights of any other person under this Act or the Australian Human Rights Commission Act 1986.”



The assertion of rights under discrimination law was made both verbally and in writing before disqualification action was taken. So that the allegation could not be levelled against them in the future of discriminating against Stephanie directly, a meeting convened with the PRO, the IJ, SYC and YV, decided to target Paul Coady with a kangaroo court and disciplinary action based upon the gender of Stephanie. Subsequent victimisation consisted of a further 4 blatant kangaroo courts and a 12 month ban recently executed. The kangaroo courts were conducted without any remote consideration for natural justice and were based upon fabricated evidence, lies and exaggerations. More information is detailed in "the facts" section of this site.



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Jim Kilroy passed away

Oct 01 2016 08:07 AM | Island Time in Articles

From Sailing Anarchy:
kilroy was there
screen-shot-2016-09-30-at-12-20-39-pmBest known for his straight talk and perhaps the most beautiful ocean racing boat in history, Jim Kilroy died last night in hospice care according to multiple sources. The Alaska-born Californian became one of California’s most successful real estate owner/developers, but his passion for the sea never dimmed.

Jim’s memoir is a lot like the man; brash and honest with a touch of vainglory; buy a copy and read one of the most interesting sailing/business stories around; Jim donated all proceeds of that book to youth causes, including sailing.

Here’s one tribute from Aussie SA’er ‘recidivist’: “In the bar of the CYCA after a Southern Cross Cup race back in the early 70′s (in which race Ted Turner cheekily put American Eagle inside Kialoa on a mark rounding – without rights), Ted entered the bar to be greeted by Jim Kilroy lifting him off the ground by his shirtfront and saying “You ever try that again and you’ll have 2 fucking six-metres”. Jim put him back down and walked out.”

Here’s another, from ‘Hitchhiker’: When asked if maxi racing isn’t a rich man’s sport, Jim said, “No. there’s one rich man aboard and 25 poor men, and they enjoy it more than the rich man does!”

Share your own Kilroy and/or Kialoa stories, pics, or what have you in what should be a legendary thread about a legendary man.

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Costal Skipper Course

Aug 10 2016 05:02 PM | Island Time in Articles

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Coastal Skipper
(55 hours)
Aim: To gain a thorough grounding in the principles and practices of coastal navigation and an understanding of the causes and effects of coastal weather. An advanced course for those wishing to undertake coastal voyages.

Prerequisites: 16 years of age, Boatmaster, Marine VHF Radio Operator Certificate, 200 hours proven sea time.

Qualification: NZ Coastal Skipper Certificate.

Course Content: Comprehensive navigation techniques, meteorology, passage planning, assessment - written and oral.

1. Coastal Navigation
The nautical chart
Courses & bearings
Magnetism & the Magnetic compass
Fixing position
Tides & tidal streams
Allowance for set & drift
Marine radar
GPS


2. Coastal Weather
Marine forecasts & weather maps
Air masses, fronts & pressure systems
Clouds & fog
Terrain effects on weather
Sea, waves, & Swell.
Passage of systems over New Zealand


3. Passage Planning Assignment and Oral Assessment
3.1 Undertaken as an individual assignment:
Passage Planning
3.2 Tested or discussed at an oral assessment:
Collision regulations
Equipment & instruments
Ship-handling & stability
Emergencies and distress signals
Master's responsibilities and obligations

Course Fee: $785.00 per person (including exam fees) - additional resources are required for this course.
Summer special* - Coastguard Northern Region Members can book on the Coastal Skipper course listed below for $670.00 pp! Please book by phone during office hours on 0508 737 283 or e-mail education@coastguard.org.nz
*Only applies to Northern Region Members"


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King of the Strait

Jul 14 2016 07:38 PM | Island Time in Articles

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NZ Chart update

Jul 12 2016 10:16 AM | Island Time in Articles

11 July 2016

Nautical Almanac and latest chart updates

Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has published its latest Nautical Almanac, and released six updated charts.

Covering 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017 the New Zealand Nautical Almanac is an authoritative source of information for safe navigation in New Zealand waters. It contains astronomical information, tide predictions for ports, and information about navigation lights, as well as LINZ’s Annual Notices to Mariners.

“This is critical information for safety at sea, and compulsory for certain vessels,” says LINZ National Hydrographer Adam Greenland. “But we’d encourage all mariners to consider carrying a copy.”

LINZ has also updated charts covering the lower South Island as well as Gisborne:

· NZ 6422 (Approaches to Timaru)
· NZ 6433 (Approaches to Oamaru)
· NZ 681 (Approaches to Bluff and Riverton/Aparima)
· NZ 5571 (Poverty Bay and Approaches to Gisborne)
· NZ 661 (Approaches to Otago Harbour)
· NZ 7654 (Chalky and Preservation Inlets)

“These updates use the latest information gathered by surveying the sea floor, so you should make sure you update your chart portfolio if you’re in these areas.”

Both the Almanac and the latest paper chart updates are available from chart retailers. They can also be downloaded in several electronic formats from the LINZ website.

Information in the Nautical Almanac is updated through LINZ’s fortnightly Notice to Mariners service.

www.linz.govt.nz www.facebook.com/landinformationnz

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World Match Racing Tour

Jul 07 2016 01:54 PM | Island Time in Articles

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A Torrid Tale of Collision, Capsize, and the Charge of the Light Brigade
The Super 16 knock-out round of the World Championship Finals sizzled with excitement and controversy today, as the World Match Racing Tour heads for a climactic finale in Sweden.

Strong, northerly winds blowing across the island of Marstrand offered up a different race course and a different challenge from previous days. It brought out the best of some of the young Antipodean teams who have flown half way round the world for a shot at the $1 million bonus prize money for the winner of this event. The likes of Western Australia’s Sam Gilmour and Matt Jerwood might have thought their chances of the big prize were pretty slim, but on the evidence of today’s performances by the young sailors from Perth, they might just have a shot if the big breeze stays up.

Jerwood took his opening match against the highly rated Danish skipper, Nicolai Sehested, and then came within a hair’s breadth of taking a second win until a small tactical error at the final turning mark let Sehested off the hook. 1-1. Jerwood made amends with another win in the third match, taking it to match point. Once again in the fourth match Jerwood got the better of Sehested in the start and led to the bottom gate. But opting for the left-hand side of the first upwind leg put the Aussie at a disadvantage on port tack as they two boats converged at high speed on the first cross.

Too late, Jerwood realised he had nowhere to go as Sehested was on a collision course with right of way. The Dane bore away too late to avoid contact and bashed into the Aussie boat, ripping the carbon hiking rack clean away from the rest of the M32 catamaran. After a 30-second consultation between the umpires, Sehested was black flag disqualified for failing to avoid the collision and causing serious damage. The end of the race, and this evening both skippers went to the protest room to make their case, waited to hear their fate from the jury. For that reason, both Sehested and Jerwood were tight lipped about the detail of the incident. “Big crash, rack came off,” said Sehested. “It was a big hit,” agreed Jerwood, “and probably quite expensive.”

Yes indeed, both teams will be in sore need of getting further through the competition to cover their damage deposit before they can start counting what’s left for them to fly home with. The jury concluded that Jerwood be given 1 penalty point, and Sehested 2 points. This means the Australian still sits on match point tomorrow, while the Dane needs to win four straight matches in order to get to the Quarter Finals. A tough prospect for one of the favourites among the 20 international teams that have come to Marstrand.

Like his fellow Australian, Gilmour found himself in a commanding position over Hans Wallén and looked headed for the Quarter Finals until Gilmour and his crew fluffed their lines at the windward mark. Wallén had just snuck around the mark ahead of Gilmour who was slow out of a tack. “The wind came in strong, about 20 knots,” said the skipper. “We came round with not much speed at the top mark, we deployed the gennaker a bit early and the boat was straight over. There was no opportunity to bail out of it.”

Wallén may have wriggled free and won that match, but Gilmour is growing in confidence and still sits on match point. “We were leading every match and we just made some small errors; we are still at match point and the boys are sailing the boat really well. Every race we do, we feel like we’re faster.”

Another Swede that likes the high winds but failed to make much of an impact today against Phil Robertson was Nicklas Dackhammar. “Phil just had our number today,” said Dackhammar. “I did some bad starts and we got a penalty, we were against a great team and they really pushed hard today.”

As well as dominating the starts, Robertson was also very fast in the strong wind, partly because all four sailors on his team sit on the rack while every other skipper sits in on the hull. "Four on the rack,” said Robertson, “and we're off like a bridesmaid's nightie!" The wily Kiwi has spotted a loophole in the M32 class rule. “We were sailing the boat underweight at other events, so we dropped our crew weight to less than 300kg.” This is the magic number where lighter teams are permitted to have all the crew hiking on the outriggers, whereas most teams are operating at the crew maximum of 350kg, with the helm sitting inboard.

“We found people cleverer than us sailors, some proper mathematicians, to do the sums for us,” said Robertson. “They worked out that even with our lighter crew weight, we’d have more righting moment. About 10% more. And it felt pretty good today. We were fast against one of the fastest high-wind teams in the M32.” Some of the other crews are certainly grumbling about the legality of what Robertson has done, but no one has actually found the grounds to throw the book at him. With the breeze set to be strong on Thursday too, Robertson may prove a real handful, especially if he stays sharp in the pre-starts. Could this be the Charge of the Light Brigade?

In the other Super 16 match of the day, Chris Steele turned on the afterburners to beat Australia’s Steve Thomas 3-1.

The Sail-Offs took place earlier in the day, with Mattias Rahm dispatching the winner of the past four years in Marstrand, Bjorn Hansen, 2-0. All the other matches went 2-1, with Eric Monnin beating Evan Walker, Murray Jones beating Sally Barkow, and Johnie Berntsson beating Keith Swinton.

Thursday’s schedule sees the conclusion of the Super 16, with even stronger breeze on the Marstrand forecast.

Live coverage will be shown at www.wmrt.com from 1400 local Swedish time.



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Marstrand Results Day 3 - Sail Off
Group 1
1. Mattias Rahm (SWE), Rahm Racing - 2 pts
2. Björn Hansen (SWE), Nautiska Racing - 0 pts

Group 2
1. Eric Monnin (SUI), Albert Riele Swiss Match Race Team - 2 pts
2. Evan Walker (AUS), KA Match / CYCA - 1 pts

Group 3
1. Murray Jones (AUS), Full Bants Racing - 2 pts
2. Sally Barkow (USA), Team Magenta 32 - 1 pts

Group 4
1. Johnie Berntsson (SWE), Flux Team - 2 pts
2. Keith Swinton (AUS), Team Accure - 1 pts


Marstrand Results Day 3 - Super 16 Knockouts
Pair 5
1. Matt Jerwood (AUS), Redline Racing - 3 pts
2. Nicolai Sehested (DEN), TREFOR Matchracing - 1 pts

Pair 6
1. Chris Steele (NZL), 36 Below Racing - 3 pts
2. Steven Thomas (AUS), RPM Racing - 1 pts

Pair 7
1. Sam Gilmour (AUS), Neptune Racing - 2 pts
2. Hans Wallén (SWE), Wallén Racing - 1.25 pts

Pair 8
1. Phil Robertson (NZL), Phill Robertsson Racing - 3 pts
2. Nicklas Dackhammar (SWE), Essiq Racing - 0 pts



VIEW FULL RESULTS



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HIGH RES IMAGES (PW: wmrt)



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Platino Abandoned

Jun 14 2016 03:38 PM | Island Time in Articles

Remaining crew rescued from stricken yacht
14 June 2016 - 3.10pm
Two men and a woman have been rescued from their battered yacht, Platino, around 550 kilometres north of New Zealand by the crew of the container ship Southern Lily.

A rescue line was used to help get the trio safely on board around 3pm.

Meanwhile, an RNZAF P3 Orion resumed searching today for a fellow crewman, aged 63, lost overboard after the yacht sustained damage to its rigging yesterday morning. The aircraft subsequently took position above the two vessels later this morning, to provide support and communications during the rescue of the three crew from the Platino.

The Orion returned to the search for the missing man around 3pm, once the trio were safely on-board the Southern Lily.

The body of another man who died in the incident remains on board the abandoned yacht, as it could not be safely transferred in the difficult conditions with three metre swells. An EPIRB beacon has been activated on the yacht to aid in tracking its location.

The yacht was abandoned after its condition deteriorated overnight as it lost steering and began taking on water.

The Rescue Coordination Centre NZ (RCCNZ) is coordinating the rescue operation and search for the missing man.

RCCNZ search and rescue mission coordinator John Dickson praised the master and crew of the Southern Lily for what was a difficult operation.

“It was not easy to get the three crew members from the yacht to the much larger ship in those sea conditions – they’ve done a tremendous job.

“We are obviously disappointed that it was not safe to transfer the body of the deceased crew member, but safety must come first. We will keep track of the position of the yacht.

“The search for the missing person has now resumed and will continue until around nightfall when the aircraft must return to New Zealand.”

The Southern Lily is now resuming its voyage to Auckland - this will take about two days..


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Sailor Lost Overboard

Jun 13 2016 05:24 PM | Island Time in Articles

Search for sailor lost overboard 550km north of NZ 13 June 2016) A search is underway for a sailor lost overboard from a yacht 550km (300 nautical miles) north of New Zealand.
The Rescue Coordination Centre NZ was advised at 11.20am today (Monday, 13 June) that one male had been killed and another man, in his 60s, knocked overboard from the 20m yacht, Platino, which had suffered serious rigging damage in winds of up to 75km/h (40knots).

Three other people are on board the yacht, which is in contact via satellite phone.

RCCNZ Search and Rescue mission coordinator Keith Allen said an RNZAF P3 Orion that was already operating in the area was on the scene within 90 minutes of the incident, and a commercial fishing vessel is heading to the area.

A second RNZAF Orion has since replaced the first aircraft and will continue searching until nightfall. If required, searching will continue at first light tomorrow. The search area is out of range of all but fixed wing aircraft.

“Sea conditions are extremely dangerous and the remaining crew on board the Platino have advised that it is too hazardous to be on deck. With limited ability to manoeuvre safely, the yacht is motoring to New Zealand, but this could take at least two days. The fishing boat is expecting to be at the scene by around 7pm but it will not be possible to search in darkness.”

ENDS

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Softbank Team Japan - 1st WIN!

Jun 12 2016 05:46 PM | Island Time in Articles

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Chicago, 06/12/2016 SoftBank Team Japan claims first win in front of huge crowd in Chicago Posted Image Ricardo Pinto / Download Posted Image Sam Greenfield / Download Posted Image Sam Greenfield / Download Posted Image Ricardo Pinto / Download

Up to 1000 boats were ringing the race area just off the city front. Tens of thousands of fans were lining iconic Navy Pier. Bars, restaurants and fan zones were heaving. The best sailors and fastest boats were ready to show what they could do. After phenomenal practice racing on Friday, with two capsizes, the wind took a while to co-operate.

So while fans enjoyed a great day on Navy Pier, officials took the ‘substitute race’, which was sailed on Friday, and scored it as Race One of the Louis Vuitton America’s Cup World Series Chicago.

That victory went to SoftBank Team Japan who would have seen a measure of justice in having Friday’s “substitute race” count on the leaderboard.

In New York, the team won the substitute race, but it was never used.

But in Chicago, with winds too light and unstable to start on time, the substitute race was inserted in the broadcast and scored as an official race. It was the first win of the Louis Vuitton America’s Cup World Series for SoftBank Team Japan.

“It’s a shame we couldn't get racing started on time today, but it's nice to turn the good work from Friday into a win on the scoreboard today,” said skipper Dean Barker.

"We've been working hard to improve our performance... Friday was a good day and we take a lot of confidence from that.”

Artemis Racing scored second place and Groupama Team France was third.

On the other side of the ledger was ORACLE TEAM USA, who capsized in the substitute race on Friday and who now must carry that last place finish on the scoreboard.

As Saturday afternoon progressed under steamy, sunny conditions, and with the sea breeze taking its time to settle in but picking up, race officials and teams extended the race window beyond the initial 3:00pm deadline and were eventually able to get one late afternoon race completed for the fans on Navy Pier.

This race was a huge crowd-pleaser and is designated as a ‘substitute race’ for Sunday. Should conditions not allow for racing to progress as scheduled on Sunday, it will be inserted in the international broadcast and scored as an official race.

Emirates Team New Zealand were the top team on Saturday, finishing ahead of ORACLE TEAM USA and Artemis Racing.

“The race today was a tough battle in front of some really impressive crowds," said Artemis Racing skipper Nathan Outteridge. "I’m pleased we were able to put on a race for everyone who turned up as the fans here in Chicago have been awesome."

“The amount of people on Navy Pier and the number of boats out on the water made for a pretty amazing experience to be out there sailing in front of them all," said Emirates Team New Zealand skipper Glenn Ashby.

"Everybody looked like they were having a really good time, in the grandstands and on the spectator boats on the water, and it was good to put in a strong win in front of every single person out there today, whether it evenutally counts on the leaderboard or not

"Racing here in Chicago has been special, and I’m glad we could take a win in front of such a big crowd.”

Conditions are predicted to be excellent tomorrow, setting up a fantastic finish for Super Sunday.


Louis Vuitton America’s Cup World Series Chicago

Race One (substitute race from Friday)

1. SoftBank Team Japan – 10 points
2. Artemis Racing – 9 points
3. Groupama Team France – 8 points
4. Emirates Team New Zealand – 7 points
5. Land Rover BAR – 6 points
6. ORACLE TEAM USA – 5 points


Saturday Substitute Race finish order (this race will only be scored if used on Sunday)

Emirates Team New Zealand
ORACLE TEAM USA
Artemis Racing
Land Rover BAR
SoftBank Team Japan
Groupama Team France

About the America’s Cup
The America's Cup is the oldest trophy in international sport, dating back to 1851, when the yacht America, after which the trophy is named, beat the best of the British fleet in a race around the Isle of Wight, U.K. The trophy won on that day was donated in trust through a Deed of Gift and has since become a symbol of immense achievement. It is perhaps the hardest trophy in sport to win. In it’s 165-year history, only four countries have managed to win the America’s Cup.

The America's Cup is currently held by the Golden Gate Yacht Club in San Francisco, U.S.A.. On September 25, 2013, its team, ORACLE TEAM USA, completed the biggest comeback in sports to retain the trophy it had first won in 2010.

On December 2, 2014, Bermuda was named as the home of the 35th America’s Cup, with the iconic Great Sound as the race course area where the new America’s Cup Class boats (15-meter, foiling, wing-sailed catamarans) from each competing nation will race for the America’s Cup in May/June 2017.

The America’s Cup is honored to partner with Louis Vuitton as the title partner of the Louis Vuitton America’s Cup World Series, the Louis Vuitton America’s Cup Qualifiers and the Louis Vuitton America’s Cup Challenger Playoffs. Louis Vuitton is also the presenting partner of the 35th America’s Cup Match, presented by Louis Vuitton.

The America's Cup is also proud to be supported by BMW, Bremont, ORACLE, XL Catlin, the Bermuda Tourism Authority, Gosling’s, Sperry and Sail Racing; as well as: Appleby, BF&M, Butterfield, Butterfield & Vallis, Moët & Chandon, PwC and the Hamilton Princess & Beach Club and in New York by Brookfield Place.

America’s Cup updates are also available on your mobile device. Go to the App Store to download the official America’s Cup App.
{C} 35th America's Cup Media Contacts
Peter Rusch
Director of PR and Communications
+1 441 519 0382
peter.rusch@americascup.com

media@americascup.com

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ANZ Sail Fiji

Jun 09 2016 09:25 AM | Island Time in Articles

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News | Competitors | Entries | FAQ | Contact sailfiji.co.nz
Daily News Wrap 9th June 2016

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Shaman set to finish tonight
The 88 footer Shaman, with Gary Lewis at the helm, will be the next boat to cross the finish line. At 1400 NZT she had 64nm to run and is sailing at 11 knots. Shaman has been a consistent performer through the race, with boat speeds amongst the top four monohulls. Her track east of the rhumb line has been …
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Video: The Cruisers in Fiji
Sharpe Focus and Moody Blue, the two cruising boats in ANZ Sail Fiji 2016 give us a (very) brief run down their passages.
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Email correspondence with Itchy Feet
Image Above: You can see Itchy Feet is emerging from a thick high cloud (very white = cold and high) associated with the front. While the main fleet is in clear skies as they head into the trades. The northern extension of the front will pass over the fleet early on Thursday morning. -----Original Message----- From: "Sally Garrett" Sent: Wed, 08 Jun …
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Update on Itchy Feet
Itchy Feet continues to make good progress, even though they are travelling at 90 degrees to the course to Fiji. Itchy Feet called Race Director Sally Garrett at 21:45 last evening (Tuesday 7th June). At the time they were making good progress in 35 knots gusting 50 knots under storm jib. All is well, and the crew are comfortable. They …
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ANZ Sail Fiji

Jun 07 2016 10:25 AM | Island Time in Articles

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News | Competitors | Entries | FAQ | Contact sailfiji.co.nz
Daily News Wrap 6th June 2016

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Team Vodafone Sailing tracker at 2%
Team Vodafone Sailing may not have another tracking update. Their unit has been drained of power and is currently at 2% battery life. All other units are between 77-89%. We will do our best to keep you updated regarding their imminent finish time. The finish boat is on station and the Royal Akarana Yacht Club team is due to depart …
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Itchy Feet causes head scratching
ANZ Sail Fiji is set to receive the first finisher tonight, but one boat has the attention of the Race Committee more than others at the moment. Itchy Feet have made a radical move heading west through throughout day two of the race. While it may seem a little different to the rest of the boats, they are setting themselves …
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State of the Trades
ANZ Sail Fiji Race Director Sally Garrett has not moved far from her computer since the start of the race at 1100 hours on Saturday 4th June. Constantly monitoring the fleet, and studying the conditions as they change, Garrett has provided the following update: "Team Vodafone Sailing could finish as early as 2230 hours �tonight. But what are the winds doing …
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Injury on board Anarchy
Anything can happen during an offshore race, so when Royal Akarana Yacht Club race management team member Suellen Hurling received a call from AJ Reid, owner and skipper of Anarchy, she prepared for whatever update was thrown her way. "Suellen it's AJ. Wow it's crazy out here! We all have goggles on whenever we are on deck. A simple task …
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Time to head east?
At 0900 hours on Monday 6th June at Raoul Island (200 nm due east of the fleet) the wind direction was 90 degreed with at a speed of 13 knots. Both the of most used models on the boats GFS and GEM show a similar wind direction (102 deg and 105 deg), but higher wind speeds. More importantly both models …
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Sail World: Hull puts the hammer down on Team Vodafone Sailing
TeamVodafoneSailing has picked up speed and is now racing towards the finish of the ANZ Sail Fiji race at a speed of close to 25kts. At 1115hrs on June 6, 2016, the 60ft trimaran had 250nm to sail to the finish line at Port Denerau. No doubt keen to make the finish line in daylight if possible, the Simon Hull …
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Auckland to Fiji in 1:47
The Royal Akarana Yacht Club Race Management Team headed to Fiji on the big steel tube in the sky. Thanks to Fiji Airways for getting them there!
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Notorious makes it to Opua
The crew of the Beneteau First 44.7 Notorious have made it safely to Opua, welcomed by Manuela Hornell, wife of Ave Gitana crew meter Chris Hornell. Christiaan Arns and his crew were in good spirits, but were obviously devastated by the outcome and the decision they needed to make. Arns, who is also a member of the Royal Akarana Yacht …
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Sail-World: Records set to be slashed as leaders fly to finish
New records are expected to be set in the ANZ Fiji Race as the leaders hurtle towards the finish line in Port Denerau, sailing a direct course in 20-25kts winds. TeamVodafoneSailing, the 60ft trimaran which won two TransAtlantic races as Geant, sailed by Michel Desjoyeaux, is expected to cross the finish line at around 11.00pm on Monday night. That will …
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Suellen Hurling
Yachting & Communicaitons Manager
Royal Akarana Yacht Club
+64 21 89 2004
suellen@rayc.co.nz

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Six-minute search saves two lost fishermen, 480...

May 18 2016 04:09 PM | Island Time in Articles

18 May 2016
Two Kiribati fishermen missing for five days in a 4.5m open boat have been found just six minutes into the search of more than 43,000 square kilometers of ocean.
The Rescue Coordination Centre New Zealand (RCCNZ) determined the most likely search area for the men who failed to return from a fishing trip on Friday, and a RNZAF P3 Orion left Whenuapai at 5am this morning to search the area.
RCCNZ Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator Mike Roberts described the result as “outstanding”, with the men’s boat found in an area of open ocean about 480km south east of Nauru.
“The aircraft arrived on scene at approximately 1.30pm (NZ time) and spotted the missing men waving from their boat within about six minutes,” he said.
“The search area was obviously correct and the aircraft has made its approach from precisely the right direction. While there is an element of luck involved, the Orion crew have done a fantastic job. I can’t recall another search being successful so quickly.”
Both men appeared to be in good health, and a survival pack containing food, water and a radio was dropped by the Orion.
An available vessel will now be identified and directed to the men, with the Kiribati search and rescue vessel, six hours away, likely to be involved in returning them to safety.
The Orion will stay overnight in Kiribati before returning to New Zealand tomorrow.

ENDS

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New Chart Updates

May 17 2016 11:53 AM | Island Time in Articles

17 May 2016

Latest chart updates cover Banks Peninsula, upper South Island

Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has released new editions of its charts for Banks Peninsula and the upper South Island.

Manager Chart Production Jennifer Abbott says the Akaroa Harbour and Banks Peninsula charts now include a new restricted area and marine reserves.

“The updates to these series of charts reflect the incorporation of survey information, updates from the Harbourmaster, as well as changes to navigational aids.

“We urge any skipper operating in the area, whether professionally or for recreation to update their chart portfolio.”

NZ 6324 (Akaroa Harbour), NZ 6321 (Lyttelton Harbour / Whakaraupo: Port of Lyttelton), NZ 632 (Banks Peninsula), NZ 62 (Cape Palliser / Matakitakiakupe to Kaikoura Peninsula), and NZ 63 (Kaikoura Peninsula to Banks Peninsula) are now available from approved retailers. Digital versions are also available to download free of charge from the LINZ website.

www.linz.govt.nz www.facebook.com/landinformationnz


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Big win for boaties in Northland Advocacy Case

May 10 2016 09:50 AM | Island Time in Articles

Recreational boaties and yachties visiting the Northland region are assured of safe access to popular anchorages, harbour entrances, bays of refuge and navigational routes thanks to the collective advocacy efforts of Yachting New Zealand, the Auckland Yachting & Boating (AYBA) and Northland Yachting Associations.

Following a significant and favourable decision from the Environment Court in June last year there will be changes made to the Regional Coastal Plan for Northland, and the ramifications are expected to benefit recreational boaties nationwide.
The changes, which include new aquaculture exclusion zones and new wording acknowledging the significance of recreational water users, come into operation today, 9 May 2016.
The process of creating Regional Plans is often long, extending over a number of years, requiring the significant commitment on the part of those involved to see the process through to completion. In this case, Council hearings were held back in 2007, while appeals to the Environment Court were lodged in 2008. Due to additional delays resulting from various changes to legislation governing aquaculture, the final decision was not released by the Court until 2015.
Notwithstanding the time and effort required, it is important that boating interests play a role in their preparation because Regional Coastal Plans control activities in the Coastal Marine Area. If the Regional Coastal Plan does not properly address those matters of concern to boaties up front, the boating community will have to face repeated battles regarding similar issues as each individual resource consent application for a Marine farm is made.
Yachting New Zealand initiated an appeal to Northland Regional Council Plan Change 4 (relating to aquaculture), worried that marine farming could clog popular bays and hamper safe passage and cruising through the Northland region.
The original plan provisions proposed did not take proper account of the need to consider and protect safe access to popular anchorages, harbour entrances, bays of refuge, navigational routes and areas commonly used for yacht racing. The appeal was supported by evidence from a number of well-known and respected boaties who have particular knowledge and experience of the Northland coast.
The advocacy collective, including Yachting New Zealand, AYBA and the Northland Yachting Association, are very pleased that the appeal has resulted in aquaculture being classified as a prohibited activity in a range of additional locations.
Andrew Clouston, Yachting New Zealand Participation and Development Manager explains that the national body was concerned due to Northland’s popularity as a cruising destination for local and visiting recreational boaties and that a number of sailing and boating clubs in the region would be affected.
The changes coming into operation are just what Yachting New Zealand was hoping for; “We now have certainty around particular areas and aquaculture prohibited in those zones,” says Clouston.
“The important aspects for us were around ensuring that recreational boaties can continue to access popular anchorages and that bays-of-refuge, used by boaties as shelter in the case of bad weather, remain accessible.”
“We were also concerned about general navigational safety,” adds Clouston. “And as a result of the decision we have also seen recognised transit routes for vessels widened and expanded. Previously the plan didn’t consider that boats, and in particular sailing yachts, don’t always travel in a straight line and deserve more than a narrow transit corridor when moving up and down our coastline.”
The advocacy group also fought to have policy wording changed to reflect the importance of the recreational use of the coastal marine area in Northland.
“The policy now recognises the importance of recreational activity and safe anchorages – it simply wasn’t in there before,” says Clouston.
Jeremy Brabant, a Barrister specialising in Environmental Law, represented Yachting New Zealand, AYBA and Northland Yachting Association collectively and was instrumental in achieving the outcome.
Richard Brabant, a Barrister and former Vice President of Yachting New Zealand, acted as counsel for landowners in the Bay of Islands who raised concerns about the potential impact of additional aquaculture in the Bay, calling expert evidence about the potential adverse effects upon landscape and recreation. In combination, the evidence from the YNZ collective and landowners has resulted in almost the entirety of the Bay of Islands being off-limits to any further aquaculture.
The key areas where significant aquaculture-free zones will come into place include Whangaroa, the Cavalli Islands, Doubtless Bay, Bream Bay, the Bay of Islands and harbour access points including Whangaruru , Tutukaka and Whangarei entrances.
New maps which show the zones where aquaculture will be prohibited have been finalised and can be viewed on the Yachting New Zealand website.
The advocacy work that goes on largely behind the scenes at Yachting New Zealand is seen by the organisation as essential to preserve the freedom for all yachties and boaties to enjoy New Zealand’s coastline, not limited to those who are members of clubs.
Doug Smeal, Commodore of Whangarei Cruising Club says, “This outcome means Yacht Club members and all boaties will be able to cruise the Northland coastline and bays and not have to worry about aquaculture structures impairing their safety."
The Environment Court decision around Northland should have national reach as a result of explicit recognition by the Court of recreational and navigational safety considerations, which will guide the preparation of plans for other regions around New Zealand. Yachting New Zealand isn’t alone in believing the upshot will benefit boaties across the country.
Richard Brabant comments on the significance of the decision;
“The Yachting New Zealand case resulted in outcomes way beyond my expectations – key and significant areas on the Northland coast from Whangarei north have been mapped as prohibited to aquaculture to the immense benefit of the boating public.”
“From my perspective, having been involved in hearings concerning provision for aquaculture in many parts of New Zealand over a number of years, this has to be the most notable success in terms of protecting our coastline, coastal waters and anchorages from the adverse effects of aquaculture.”
The updated Regional Coastal Plan for Northland (incorporating Plan Change 4 text) will be available on the NRC website from 09 May 2016: www.nrc.govt.nz/rcp
For more information contact:
Jodie Bakewell-White
Yachting New Zealand Communications Manager
Tel. 021 709 065
Email. Jodie@yachtingnz.org.nz


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