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galvanised rigging

ferro yacht rigging

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#1 Seasick sheamus

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 06:31 AM

I apologise in advance to all the old hands because you have no doubt discussed this to death but if you could just give me the benefit of your experience I would be very grateful....

 

I am intending installing galvanised wire rigging 1770 to all the latest uk bs codes. I intend putting 10mm everywhere except on the lower shrouds on the mizzen where it will be 8mm. I intend using a steel or aluminium nicopress swage. My mast is Aluminium and my rigging screws are SS so I will ensure that any galv touching a dissimilar metal will be isolated. I will soak the wire in boiled linseed oil, allow to dry then put protective another coating on the wire.???? 

 

what do you think?

 

the cost will be 1/10th of the price of SS? I got a quote of around £5000 for a rigger to do it in stainless with swages!!!!!

 

thanks


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#2 Island Time

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 07:59 AM

I'm sure Wheels will answer with a more technical solution, but that sounds fine. Galv is actually a better material for rigging - as it normally does not fail catastrophically, but shows the signs first. It's is not as pretty as SS, that's all....


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#3 Seasick sheamus

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 08:19 AM

because mine is a ketch with a 16m main mast and a 12m mizzen...the main mast having 2 main shrouds and 2 lowers either side  (8 shrouds) with 2 forestays and 2 backstays (just the main mast)....in SS it would cost a fortune!!! meant to say it will be 7x7 galv wire.....!!!!!


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#4 Knot Me... maybe

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 10:23 AM

1x19 will stretch a lot less than 7x7 or 7x19 will. Have you looked at a compacted galv wire as a option? Lighter stronger but will probably cost a little more. By compacted I mean Dyform or Hammastrand being 2 prominent brand names of compacted wires.

 

Galv wire was used extensively in race yachts as it's lighter, stronger and as IT points out fails nicer. The only downside it has over SS is it can rust.

 

I'd have a suss of some of the newer cold galvanising like products. A mate has galv wire on his big steel and he painted it years ago. Still looks sort of OK and he's thinking it would have been better to have used a rust discouraging paint system rather than 'a tin of some crap I found under the house'. Oil is good but it can be messy so it is nice playing with the mates not oily boat, if you catch me drift.


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#5 wheels

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 04:43 PM

Seasick, KM is the expert on the types of Wire to look for.

But yes, Galv wire is far superior to SST. SST work hardens. Every little vibration, stretch and strain of the rig causes the wire to ever so slowly work harden at the swage terminal where no movement takes place. Eventually it causes an invisible to the eye, crack and then can fail and all the time look good as gold. It is also subject to a condition called Crevice corrosion, which those little invisible cracks corrode away inside and then the wire fails. Because of this, there is a rule of thumb that SST rigging should be replaced every 10 to 15yrs. Where as Galv rigging can be used indefinitely providing you keep an eye out for rust. The most usual area is right at the swage terminal where the galv may have been damaged when being crunched down. The Linseed oil works well, although Lanocote in the spray form, or Fish Oil can also be used.
I have only one concern though. Do I understand correctly that the Rigging screws are SST and you are swagging onto the Galv?
I can't answer if that is a problem or not and hopefully KM (Calling KM) will chip in with info on that. But my thoughts are that SST terminals are made to suit the way the SST wire crunches down. I have no clue to how that will go with swagging onto a Galv wire. Normally Galv wire is run through an eye terminal and then turned back on itself and crimped upon itself with a Copper or Ally Ferrule.


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#6 Knot Me... maybe

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 05:29 PM

Good question Wheels. I've seen galv into SS swages but aren't too sure of the longer term implications though. I don't think swaging onto SS wire of Galv would make much strength difference though.

 

I'll suss what I can find on the SS fittings to galv wire question.

 

There are sockets you can put on the end of galv wire, they are used extensively in commercial and high load applications. They used to use white metal but now have epoxys that do the same job. A little clunky but tidier than the alternatives. If you had those on then just use some US Fed Spec galv rigging screws and you'll have a lot stronger and cheaper set up than if you used SS.

 

I know of a boat that uses those rigging screws and they have stood the test of time very well. (Capt K on the big G, Wheels)


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#7 Seasick sheamus

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 05:45 PM

Hi folks (and good to hear from wheels & KM)...

 

I will look into compacted galv wire,,,,

 

Sorry I was a bit unclear....

 

It will be 10mm 7x7 galv wire terminated in a  talurite eye onto a fork end stainless steel screw.

 

I was thinking of sheathing the clevis pin of the SS fork where the Galv eye is connected (to isolate dissimilar metals). I dont want to wrap the thimbled talrite eye because I want to see is if it starts failing.

 

I was then going to sheath the ferrule in heat shrink and  oil/paint the shrouds accordingly...

 

?????


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#8 wheels

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Posted 18 November 2015 - 06:11 AM

SST, Steel and Galv are all fine together as far as dissimilar metals go. Rust is the enemy of SST, but plain steel will not react in a Galvanic way with SST. Galv is an excellent metal to protect the SST. If the entire fitting was underwater, it would be a different story.
Do not try insulating anything with Heatshrink or tape or whatever. None remain fully waterproof and it is when water can be left to sit around a fitting that galvanic action takes place. It is best to let the air around. Oils like you are considering using are still the best.


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#9 Seasick sheamus

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Posted 18 November 2015 - 06:51 AM

Hi wheels. Understood. I'll soak and protect as discussed. I'll leave it all uncovered. I think the key is to get good quality galv wire in the first place and then be fastidious with the maintenance. I've found a UK manufacturer called Ormiston wire. 

I also read somewhere (I recall somewhere in the back of my mind), of someone that brushed a  mixture of linseed oil and varnish onto their galv wire. The benefit being that it dried and sails and clothing and hands didn't get gooey deposits????

 

I'm also suprised at the antics of the rigging companies I have spoken to. They all  lied about the advantages of Galv verses SS and did everything to persuade me to pay thousands....................  


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#10 wheels

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Posted 18 November 2015 - 04:45 PM

My original rigging was Galv. I had to replace my main mast 5 or 6 yrs ago and I asked for Galv rigging, but SST was used instead. I was not amused (long story) when it came to the price. However my Mizzen mast is still rigged with the original Galv. That is close to 20yrs old now and still looks just fine and has never had anything done to it. So it is not a case of having to do a lot of maintenance. As IT said, SST is used just because it is shiny. When the day comes for me to replace the SST, I will be going back to galv.
Oh and the reason why Boiled Linseed is used is that it should also dry so as it is not sticky. Where as raw Linseed remains slightly tacky and goes dark in Sunlight. Very early days rigging used that Tape with the tacky grease stuff coated on it. But it is plain horrible stuff to get coated on things.


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