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Single Handed Spinnaker Handling


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#11 Jon

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 07:52 AM

Trail the brace behind also then before you drop you can see if both the halyard and brace are tangle free
I still like to ping the brace but will run it if needed, the biggest help is getting the headsail up first then running off deep, don't allow yourself to carry it too long and on a reach you will often do better two sailing as you'll travel less distance and won't spend the next leg with a large flag rapped around your forestay
As for your halyard if you haven't a jammer on your mast above your winch then add one, this allows you to remove the halyard from the winch and run it through a snatch block at the base if the mast then back to a free winch in the cockpit, when you go forward ti ping the brace open the halyard jammer first then the kite will be free flying behind the main so then you can control everything from the cockpit.
Sounds easy aye, but with practice it becomes doable
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The best sailors do it two handed


#12 Fish

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 12:02 PM

Hi Jon, yes we have a good spinlock jammer on the mast. so can lock off the kite halyard and run it back to a spare winch in the cockpit. Am thinking about set ups around that, bring the halyard back into the cockpit, which should simplify the actual drop and gathering in.

I see some advantages in being familiar with running the brace, as I still have the pingable clips on the sheets, then this gives me options to ping it or blow it. Am starting to think there is logic in trailing the brace and the halyard. Definitely don't have any stopper knots in anything attached to the kite.

We normally run sheets and braces on the kites, meaning there is a second rope to ensure will run free. But sheets and braces are so we have lazy sheets for gybing, so I may not run them when solo. Gybing the big kite solo would be down the list a bit after getting confident with putting it up and down. Have gybed the VMG runner solo, but that was in drifter conditions and hardly counts.

 

Interesting there is not a lot of comment on the gennaker furlers. The digging around I've done indicate they aren't cheap, and while they can be really handy, you still need a bit of technique and practice to ensure you get  good tight furl. All the promo videos are in nice sunny 10 knot breezes, can't find any footage of anyone furling a gennaker in 25 gusting 30...


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#13 Island Time

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 12:34 PM

You might like this one;

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKIAL8lyoWY


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There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing, as simply messing about in boats


#14 MarkMT

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 02:40 PM

Nice, but quite a rigmarole getting that thing up and down. Sure makes me appreciate the snuffer...

 

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#15 Knot Me... maybe

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 03:16 PM

 

Interesting there is not a lot of comment on the gennaker furlers. The digging around I've done indicate they aren't cheap, and while they can be really handy, you still need a bit of technique and practice to ensure you get  good tight furl. All the promo videos are in nice sunny 10 knot breezes, can't find any footage of anyone furling a gennaker in 25 gusting 30...

They are good if you get a good one set up well, if not just stab yourself in the eye, it'll be less painful than using a half arsed one.


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#16 Changed

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 07:18 PM

I use a Caligo gennaker furler. It has a torsion line that the gennaker roles around from the top down. Will always roll up tight when you're underway. Just takes more turns than you think. Not cheap but a little cheaper than the sail. Ideal when you're gybing with runners.


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#17 madyottie

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 12:13 PM

Nice, but quite a rigmarole getting that thing up and down. Sure makes me appreciate the snuffer...

 

Do you have one line to pull the kite up and out to the end of the prod, or two separate lines?

 

I know a lot of high performance dinghies now have a continuous line that does everything with one pull. And some even use a pump up/down system.


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3mm ply is no match for 110kg size 11 boots! Anyone know how to fix my foredeck?

 


#18 Clipper

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 12:39 PM

Do you have one line to pull the kite up and out to the end of the prod, or two separate lines?

I know a lot of high performance dinghies now have a continuous line that does everything with one pull. And some even use a pump up/down system.


I would run with 2 separate lines on your gbe. Much easier to deport mad give options in the takedown and hoist. Can hoist halyard, then tack, no risk of running over the kite. If you pull tack too soon, watch it go under the boat....

Reverse on a drop (even singlehanded). Grab lazy, blow sheet and tack, collect foot, blow halyard.
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#19 madyottie

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 02:00 PM

Yeah, run over a few kites in my lifetime, I don't remember ever doing it on my own boats tho.

 

Apparently my kites a fraccy, so should be slightly easier to deal with than some other mastheads. Although I believe it has been trawled once before.

 

Do you normally drop on the windward side? In my skiff days we would run flat so the kite collapsed, then haul windward sheet until the clew was in hand, then dump halyard and tack together. Transferred the exact same method to the Fireball except had to trip the pole when flat off to reach the tack. (Symmetric kites).


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3mm ply is no match for 110kg size 11 boots! Anyone know how to fix my foredeck?

 


#20 MarkMT

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 03:38 PM

Do you have one line to pull the kite up and out to the end of the prod, or two separate lines?

 

I know a lot of high performance dinghies now have a continuous line that does everything with one pull. And some even use a pump up/down system.

 

On the Falcon I have a separate tack line that runs out through the inside of the pole. On my last boat I had a single line system and I definitely prefer separate lines. A single line sounds good but as Clipper says two lines gives you more control of the deployment, and when you're ready to hoist it enables you to get the sail up a little quicker than if it's pulling through a 2:1 on the tack at the same time.

 

In my case the tack line is pulled approaching or just after rounding the top mark (depending on what else is going on) and it pulls automatically into a cam cleat under the mainbeam. Singlehanded especially, the hoist is delayed till closer to the offset mark. If there's breeze you often want to be able to steer a little deeper before getting the kite up.

 

In case it's not obvious, the tail end of the halyard (the red line) is also the retrieval line - it goes through the tramp, and out through the snuffer to the loops on the sail. The red handle in the middle of the tramp is attached to a light line that pulls the tack line out of its cleat under the beam once most of the sail is back in the snuffer.

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