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#21 haiqu

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 11:46 AM

The pics don't worry me at all - I may post some pics sometime, of my boat when I took her over.
However what rings bells with me is that you bought a ferro-cement boat some three years prior to breaking free with exterior damage including a crack that was shipping water. You repaired some months later (perhaps a year later?) by just applying cement from the inside which might stop water ingress but certainly wont't protect the 'ferro' (there are two quite dissimilar materials in any reinforced concrete structure) but still had not slipped her to repair properly some two years later. In my view, unless your reinforcement is SS316, there's a good chance it's pretty much fucked across the crack line. And so, again in my view, I'm thinking their actions are entirely appropriate.

You also agree that it should be repaired to a 'standard' - which means you think that it's currently not up to that same standard.

But hey - I was just expressing my opinion - based entirely on what you wrote - no need to swear at me!

 

Clearly you know little to nothing about ferro yachts. They don't use stainless reinforcement, unless the builder was an idiot.

 

My point here is that the yacht is afloat, is not sinking, is not a hazard to shipping and that the incident was trivial. It was also reported to water police within half an hour of breaking free but they took nine hours to respond, by which time the yacht had drifted a kilometre into a wharf, and then it _was_ becoming a problem. The initial order was made by an MSQ officer who assumed that damage he could see was caused by collision with a wharf.

 

A crack repair of this type is trivial and non-urgent. The yacht isn't going to suddenly disintegrate and become an environmental hazard. If you don't know that, pull your head in.


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#22 Island Time

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 12:22 PM

Actually, if a crack in a ferro boat allows water into the steel or mesh, it can very well lead to serious structural issues if not correctly repaired in a timely manner. I'm sure that is all Scottie meant. A leak into the boat through a crack is certainly cause for concern. A repair must keep the water away from the steel.

 

Everyone, be polite and constructive in your comments, or I will moderate or lock this thread.


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#23 B00B00

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 04:07 PM

Sorry Haiqu, I'm with ScottiE on this one.

Not only does the boat sound unseaworthy but leaving it on Anchor for 2 weeks (or longer?) unattended with the anchor chain causing:  'A little light crushing of the concrete on the bow' ....?


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#24 haiqu

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 12:57 PM

Auction closed at $255.00 but the buyer was 800km away and neither paid nor contacted me. Typical of eBay these days, 18yo zero-feedback dorks with nothing better to do than make a nuisance of themselves. So, I'll be hauling out in the next few weeks and doing the work.

 

Honestly, if you girls are worried about such damage I suggest giving up sailing. These things have been smashed on remote reefs and had holes repaired on a beach. That's one of the benefits of ferro yachts.

 

Yes, an unrepaired crack could very well lead to serious structural issues eventually, but it would take many years for that to occur, which is the point I tried to make to the authorities. And the repair of such damage could be done by anyone with a sledge hammer, some reo and a bag of cement.


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#25 B00B00

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 02:19 PM

It's that attitude that probably got you into this situation in the first place...
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#26 haiqu

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 05:02 PM

Anyone recognise this design? It's parked up near me and I haven't seen this shape of ferro before.

 

 

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#27 haiqu

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 05:07 PM

It's that attitude that probably got you into this situation in the first place...

 

Which "attitude" are you referring to? And what "situation"? These sorts of vaguely insulting comments are childish, pointless and non-constructive.

 

So far I haven't seen any rational input to this thread, and until I get an idea of who actually owns a ferro vs who is just being a jerk you will be ignored.


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#28 wheels

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 05:34 PM

Anyone recognise this design? It's parked up near me and I haven't seen this shape of ferro before.

 

I think that could be a Tahitian with a clipper bow. There were a few of those around in the early days until the more modern Cutter Bow became more popular. The clipper had on big advantage though. If you get the forestay well forward of the bow, these boats really haul.

haiqu is correct about the steel being OK. If any damage is below waterline, It really does come down to the anode in the end. If the Steelwork comes in direct contact with the Saltwater, the anodes will likely erode away much faster, but will still protect the steel. When we hit the Rock reef some years ago, we broke a good chunk away and exposed the steel running along the Keel. I simply kept the anodes up till I could get it hauled, which was 2yrs later. The steel was fine. I gave it a good wash and plastered up the hole and it's all sweet again.

Sorry to hear you just had time wasters on ebay haiqu.
 


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#29 B00B00

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 07:58 PM

Could almost be a Herreshoff Nereia 36 with a slightly modified cabintop.

Haiqu, we are obviously vastly different in our views of boat maintenance and seamanship- regardless of what material our boats might be made of.
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#30 Steve Pope

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Posted 17 June 2016 - 11:14 AM

Cement makes a chemical bond with mild steel, just look at the many thousands of water tanks that have been in use in NZ for decades. Vastly underated material.


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