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#21 Steve Pope

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Posted 14 January 2017 - 11:53 AM

Just to throw another thing into the mixer, why isn't NZ adopting the DSC emergency system for VHF's ??


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#22 erice

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Posted 15 January 2017 - 09:47 PM

Just to throw another thing into the mixer, why isn't NZ adopting the DSC emergency system for VHF's ??

 

some threads on it here  somewhere

 

apparently too many false calls were made overseas + the costs to upgrade all our shore stations was considered excessive....too many black spots in our vhf coverage

 

cell phones working really well, most people carrying them etc etc etc


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#23 Elly

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 12:42 PM

In the new safety rules, flares have been downgraded, and you only need orange smoke for daytime, and red pinpoint for night time.

So this may have reduced the need for LED flares.


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#24 Steve Pope

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 06:59 AM

I know that in many cases my cell ph only picks up a signal around 5 to 7 miles from shore, not a patch on VHF reception. Also with a DSC capable VHF you can contact AIS equipped ships with the press of a button to ask their intentions etc.


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#25 motorbike

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 07:13 AM

Barrier has poor VHF and cell for example, if you had an incident on the E side then a flare would be very useful (if someone saw it and acted on it), but an EPIRB may be better?


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#26 erice

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 08:51 AM

gps epirbs do seem the way to go

 

and require no extra outlay by the authorities

 

the response time is getting pretty good and with the modern units sending the lat/long 

 

a copter or boat can know here to go very easily 


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#27 Ed

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 10:50 AM

Have we got full time satellite coverage over NZ now for epirbs/plbs or is it still patchy?


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#28 Ed

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 11:07 AM

gps epirbs do seem the way to go

 

and require no extra outlay by the authorities

 

the response time is getting pretty good and with the modern units sending the lat/long 

 

a copter or boat can know here to go very easily 

 

Some friends of mine were off hiking in the middle of the south island, someone slipped and broke an ankle. NO worries they through, we'll just activate our small compact lightweight plb and wait for the chopper. After 6 or 7 hours, no chopper appears.

Then they decide to activate the bigger grunty marine epirb (don't ask why the wait, that is an entirely different story) and the chopper appeared within minutes.

 

Turns out the little PLB didn't get and transmit a gps fix, which was indicated by a small red flashing light and explained by the tiny font size instructions on the side of the unit. The chopper had been searching about 10kms away 3 or 4 valleys over. Moral of the story is make sure you understand the operation of your safety gear, and don't just rely on one piece of equipment


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#29 Beccara

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 12:47 PM

Have we got full time satellite coverage over NZ now for epirbs/plbs or is it still patchy?

 

 

Since 03 there's been geostationary birts augmenting the low/medium COSPAS earth orbit birds, Since the 406mhz switch over I don't believe there's been any patchy coverage bar the poles which have no geo coverage.

 

Ed's story about the PLB is something i've heard alot, the small PLB's have touchy GPS units so in a valley they need really clear sight to the sky. I wish these smaller PLB's had 121.5mhz homing signals like alot of the EPIRB's, The chopper crew would have been able to know sooner they were in the wrong spot


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#30 AJ Oliver

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Posted 12 February 2017 - 05:05 AM

I know this does not directly apply to NZ, but . .

 

Here is what the US Coast Guard regs are now for coastal waters and

Great Lakes (they changed in 2016) . .

 

led's can now substitute for flares 

 

ELECTRIC S-O-S DISTRESS LIGHT
APPROVAL CATEGORY:  161.013

APPROVAL GUIDANCE & INFORMATION:  This is an alternative to flares for recreational boats.  It is required to automatically flash S-O-S.  Light intensity and duration requirements apply.  Electric S-O-S distress lights are self-certified by the manufacturer. The Coast Guard does not issue approvals or keep an authenticated list of manufacturers.  Approval standards for these lights are found in Title 46 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Subpart 161.013.  

 

For me, this is a good change - I hate the very idea of holding a lit flare on a moving boat while trying to care for an injured person. 

 

The price for the LED'S is now starting to come down. Last year they were $ 100 USD's


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