Jump to content


Photo

LED lighting


  • Please log in to reply
47 replies to this topic

#11 Winter

Winter

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 55 posts

Posted 23 February 2017 - 05:56 AM

I have put the opti up my mast recently and swapped out the fat dc cable with some which was maybe 1/4 the Gauge. Its absolutely tiny. Ill go look what awg it is. This is at 12v with no issues.

Those optis will produce the same light output down to 9v or so
  • 0

#12 island time

island time

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 5,182 posts
  • LocationHome from Cruising, Now Gulf Harbour

Posted 23 February 2017 - 10:49 AM

The 2 wire control system is canbus. It's kind of expensive to retrofit a boat with it. My brother used it in his boat about 10 years ago, one of the first in NZ to do so. I helped him program the system. It's certainly versatile, and can save considerable cable weight.
Oh, and please note optolamp and opti light are different companies.
  • 0

There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing, as simply messing about in boats


#13 tuffyluffy

tuffyluffy

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,274 posts

Posted 23 February 2017 - 11:01 AM

Re the Hella range, one of the several reasons it is so darn expensive is due to the ability to produce a wide bandwith of White light. Many will know that a simple white LED light may look really bright, but for some weird reason, it is hard to see things by the light. This is due to a very narrow bandwidth of light. Or on other words, not enough colours are going into making the white. We see things by reflection. A colour is due to that colour reflecting more of that band of light. Remove some of the light spectrum and we start missing detail. Add to that, some LED's tend to produce a lot of Blue and Blue end of the spectrum is hard fro our eyes to see. So the combinations of above make things hard to see, even though the LED seems bright. Hella have a wide bandwidth which makes the interior seem brighter and warmer and that is expensive to do and reflects the price.

 

Not sure I buy that explanation Wheels. I can buy retrofit, 12V, broad spectrum LED's for my house from Mitre 10 for $4 and there's no noticeable difference with the old filament bulbs. 


  • 0

#14 jonathan

jonathan

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 172 posts

Posted 23 February 2017 - 11:54 AM

tuffy - tell me more , haven't thought about domestic but why not..... if they done work on boat I could move to my mancave..... 

 

wheels - i have seen retrofited euro 115's dam its a nice light......


  • 0

#15 tuffyluffy

tuffyluffy

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,274 posts

Posted 23 February 2017 - 01:45 PM

tuffy - tell me more , haven't thought about domestic but why not..... if they done work on boat I could move to my mancave..... 

 

wheels - i have seen retrofited euro 115's dam its a nice light......

 

I've been progressively swapping the old 12v filament style bulbs with LEDS as the old ones expire. Its a straight forward bulb swap that works fine unless they're on dimmers . Mitre 10 were selling 5 packs for $20.

 

IIRC an old 50 watt bulb is replaced with a 4 watt LED


  • 0

#16 wheels

wheels

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 15,878 posts

Posted 23 February 2017 - 04:03 PM

 

Not sure I buy that explanation Wheels. I can buy retrofit, 12V, broad spectrum LED's for my house from Mitre 10 for $4 and there's no noticeable difference with the old filament bulbs.

I am not saying Hella can justify the extra cost. I perhaps should reword my comment. The Hella lights are better than many other cheaper 12V lights on the market and hence why you end up paying more. Should they be that expensive?? I am not sure why they are, but they are and they are still in Business after how many years? And all there products have always been expensive. But it is good product.
In saying that, the world of LED is fast changing. I use cheap LED bulbs in all my lights and have done for years. They work well for my requirements.
Be aware that 230V LED lights have lots of electronics in them that can make a lot of RF noise on a boat.


  • 0

#17 DrWatson

DrWatson

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,765 posts
  • LocationLand locked

Posted 23 February 2017 - 09:00 PM

Yes I could get a 12/24v step up box, but the masthead has 5? 4? wires? Whatever gauge you need for 12v, you can go smaller again for 24v even if it's a very low current draw. Unless of course it's so low it doesn't really matter and that you simply can't get a finer gauge or it will corrode. 

 

OK, I think I've chatted briefly with Matt before about Can-bus. Seems would be good for lights and information systems (nav etc.?), but for high load systems?, or pumps, is there any advantage? I mean you'd still have to run designated feed to those, no? 

 

For things that you switch off and on I see the point, but I guess the pumps will all be hardwired (fuse+ central switch)

 

As I understand it, one needs special nodes for each light/device and for the switching system, (unless you centralise the switching into one multi function control box).

 

So Can-bus LEDs for each light fitting. and then a central controller to talk to each LED, no?


  • 0

"Si Dieu n'existait pas, il faudrait l'inventer"

 


#18 island time

island time

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 5,182 posts
  • LocationHome from Cruising, Now Gulf Harbour

Posted 23 February 2017 - 09:20 PM

Yes, central control, and node controler for each light. Generally a heavy ring main power cable around the boat. Any device connected to that rather than running back to the distribution panel. It can save a huge amount of cabling if properly designed. No fuses, virtual fuses, any physical switch can be programmed for any function. Momentary press can do one thing, double press another,hold for a third. Very versatile and easy to expand. However, retrofitting, as you may imagine is a big job. Can and should be considered if you are considering a complete rewire.
  • 0

There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing, as simply messing about in boats


#19 island time

island time

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 5,182 posts
  • LocationHome from Cruising, Now Gulf Harbour

Posted 23 February 2017 - 09:22 PM

Oh, and Dr W, the optolamp 24v version just comes with a voltage converter. I can get you one if you like?
  • 0

There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing, as simply messing about in boats


#20 Winter

Winter

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 55 posts

Posted 23 February 2017 - 09:29 PM

Yes, central control, and node controler for each light. Generally a heavy ring main power cable around the boat. Any device connected to that rather than running back to the distribution panel. It can save a huge amount of cabling if properly designed. No fuses, virtual fuses, any physical switch can be programmed for any function. Momentary press can do one thing, double press another,hold for a third. Very versatile and easy to expand. However, retrofitting, as you may imagine is a big job. Can and should be considered if you are considering a complete rewire.

Sounds like you are describing 'Czone' or other NMEA2000 switching systems. 

NMEA-2000 after all, is actually CAN bus.  

The BEP Czone stuff is kiwi designed.. Looks awesome, until you see the price. 


  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users