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Marine Electricians - Masters from the Monkeys?

12v dc on a boat

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#1 Zozza

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Posted 05 August 2017 - 10:05 PM

With nothing much to do this weekend but lie in bed and recover from the flu, I did a 6 hour watch online yesterday and today of a basic marine electrical course.

 

I now have gone from knowing nothing (well I knew what + and - meant, but not much more) to knowing a little bit. I.E I now know I need thicker gauge wire for some applications depending on run and the power needed to run the gadget, I know I need fuses in the right places, I know what a short is. I know how something as simple as a bolt can cause a short.  I know to never allow welding wire on my boat....etc etc etc. A ton of stuff I learnt indeed.  Most of what I learnt you seasoned fellas would laugh and say 'You didn't know that"? 

No, I didn't.

Never needed to.

 

Anyway, this has made me realise, that when a marine electrician does finally wire my boat I will now know the basic questions to ask without sounding like a complete know nothing idiot.  Whether that means I now know enough to circumvent allowing a "Cowboy" Electrician working on my boat? Not sure - hence this post.

 

I want to deal with a marine electrician that not only knows what he is doing, but follows all the standards to a T, does not deviate EVER from the safety standards for "Time saving" and "cost savings" purposes, and doesn't mind answering questions.

 

My first boat (now sold for my new-to-me but still old slightly bigger boat) was wired up north and being new to this electric stuff, I just picked the local outfit and assumed they knew what they were doing,. Im now in Auckland with my new / old boat, and this time I want to make sure what is done is done right and is going to last and not have me worrying.

 

Whom do you fellas reccomend out there as the best mix of attitude and competency?

 

Cheers.


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#2 Zozza

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Posted 05 August 2017 - 10:26 PM

In case anyone out there is / was like me, and just "pretended" to know what the f#ck people were talking about when it comes to marine electrical, then I highly recommend these 6 one hour videos.  This guy has that rare talent of making stuff I thought to be  horrendously complicated (one tends to avoid learning stuff that seems like black magic) sound logical and almost straightforward. Plus he has a good sense of humour.  Trust me, I am not one for sitting down and watching anything this long in such a short space of time, except maybe binge watching Breaking Bad. So, he must be good - and he is,
Here is the first hour vid, and you know what to do to watch the rest of them on the youtube:


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#3 Kevin McCready

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 09:30 AM

Thanks for this. Do you know Boatowner's mechanical and electrical manual
Book by Nigel Calder
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#4 Zozza

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 09:35 AM

Thanks for this. Do you know Boatowner's mechanical and electrical manual
Book by Nigel Calder

 

No problem Kevin.

The Calder book is highly recommended as "THE" Boat Electrics book, by the fella giving the video tutorial.

It's on my list to purchase.


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#5 island time

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 11:42 AM

I work in this field, mostly electronics, but electrical as well. DC only under 50v, I'm not a registered electrician. I can arrange 230v work though, fully certified.
I'm happy to answer any questions I can, and I also strongly recommend Nigel Calders book!
For anyone in Auckland who wants me to do anything, I'm back after this contract in Fiji, about the end of this month.
Wire sizing tables and conversions etc are available on my website, www.neptunes-gear.com.
Cheers
Matt
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There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing, as simply messing about in boats


#6 motorbike

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 02:20 PM

Ill vouch for IT, great back up and personal service.
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#7 ricka

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 05:53 PM

Keith at....
http://ealelectric.co.nz/
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#8 Dtwo

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 08:37 PM

I would recommend that prior to engaging anyone, get a really clear picture in your head of what you want to achieve.  Prepare lists of equipment, broken down by location, as well as any future stuff that you may want to wire up in future.  Think through your charging and usage requirements so the recommendations are based on your thoughts.  Get a wiring diagram (I have a 45 page manual which is friggin' invaluable).  Get them to label all wires (as shown in your wiring schematic).  Yes, that will be more expensive in the short term but my belief is that it will pay for itself once you sell the boat - and it is friggin' invaluable when you want to trace something.


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#9 Zozza

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 10:58 PM

Thanks Dtwo.  I don't mind that it may cost a bit more - I have put everything I own into this boat the last two years, so a wee bit more to get diagrams and labelling all done as you suggested is neither here nor there....I'm going to be just as broke at launch time.


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#10 island time

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 10:12 AM

There are two basic labelling options. One is to use numbers, the other whole names. I prefer whole names, both ends of the wire, I use a brother label maker, then clear heat shrink over the label to seal it. Gives a long lasting, easily read label.
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There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing, as simply messing about in boats





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