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Stack-pack Sailrite kit vs source parts locally

sail cover stack-pack lazy jack

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#11 nagy592

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 08:04 AM

That's pretty much a good point and easy to do. Also a good practice, I think, to lower the bag when the sail is up, so whatever happens with the boom it will not tear the cover.


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#12 180S

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 10:03 PM

I have been traveling down the DIY dodger route.
Have tried making a copy from the unpicked original; didnt work like i wanted, the material is too stretched/warped to make a good pattern.
Tried buying local, but couldnt find a single source of supply ie sunbrella,PTFE thread,pattern material,windows etc.
Ended up going to Sailrite as they have all the supplies including a fantastic resource for learning videos and even with gst and shipping cost no more than buying local.
The problem locally is suppliers like TopFab who distribute the sunbrella is a distributer and do not sell direct. So it all has middlemen , taking their cut, fair enough I guess but it pushes the cost up and no single source of supply and knowledge.
I can go to sailrite and get precisely what I need and delivered inside 2 weeks.
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#13 island time

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 10:09 PM

Yep, sure can. Sailrite is a good source of info and gear. I've used them myself when I was off shore.

Now I'm here and (forced to be) working again, I've been doing a few cover repairs locally, so I can supply whatever you need - I have accounts  with Topfab and Shann. 

Send me a PM or give me a call - 0221539176 if you'd like some prices.

Matt


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There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing, as simply messing about in boats


#14 Frank

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 05:36 AM

Out of curiosity what sort of money would we be talking about for a stack pack on a 40 ft yacht ? Just wondering if anyone has a rough idea, i'll get a quote at some stage.

 


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#15 southernman

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 06:57 AM

I got one made for a 44 ft boat last year by Norths I think it was $1600 or maybe a little less BUT not a lot of thought went into chafe.  

 

For instance around clutches on the mast, a very good idea is to have white pvc sewed on the inside around wear points which will stop the fabric from being worn.  


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#16 nagy592

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 09:48 AM

Hi All, yes pretty much worth it to look around locally and source components here rather from overseas, based on my recent experience, also a few thoughts about dealing with Sunbrella without "professional" sewing machine.

#1  Walking foot is helpful, but the available "attachments" for domestic machines (Brother GS2700) are not that effective, so work without it is probably easier apart from long strait stitches.

#2  Using as large needle you can source ( 110/16 worked well for me), especially for PTFE thread. 

#3  My biggest issue was the position of the machine as my one  is a portable type which is sitting on the table, therefore "feeding" the material through evenly is a very difficult task (at leas was for me as I'm not an experienced machinist at all). If I do it next time I'll make up something to lower the machine to table top level.

 

Do it myself was a reasonably good choice, If I start again I would start with something smaller and simpler project. The cover is 85% ready, I have to figure it out how I want to attach to the lazy jacks (the way how sailrite does not too pretty, but I probably just over think it)

.Attached File  20170910_171719.jpg   275.89KB   2 downloads


Edited by nagy592, 11 September 2017 - 09:49 AM.

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#17 clareb

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 02:12 PM

Looks great, well done.  Let us know how you go attaching the lazy jacks.  I'm going to do some sheet bags etc before making ours to get a bit of practice in.


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#18 nagy592

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 03:41 PM

Thanks, I was thinking to attach "webbing ears" like on the two end of the top (bottom of the picture) to attach the jack lines to them rather then cut the fabric. I really don't know yet, luckily I still have a couple of weeks before I have to put it on so I would much appreciate any suggestion regarding this.

clareb, good idea to start with something smaller just to get some experience with the fabric (unless you already have some). I will do the small things later, but I'm fairly confident I will not change my day job for this. Respect for everyone who do it for living.


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#19 clareb

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 04:28 PM

nagy582 - there's a facebook group I've just found that discusses sewing for boats, they post photos of projects (sail covers, lee cloths etc) and seem keen to give advice - could be helpful for your webbing ears question?

https://www.facebook...s/sewingonboats


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#20 island time

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 07:22 PM

A common way to attach the lazy jacks is to a batten in a sewn sleeve/pocket along the top of the stack pack. This is how my one is done. I can provide a pic if it would help?


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