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Lost for months in the mid-Pacific


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#11 raz88

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 08:13 AM

It's begun, they've done their first interview...

 

http://www.nzherald....jectid=11937674


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#12 erice

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 08:14 AM

  • Two Honolulu women, Jennifer Appel and Tasha Fuiava, were lost at sea for five months after their planned voyage went horribly awry
  • On the first day, one woman's cell phone washed overboard and sank........maybe a sat phone...a wave in the ocean, what are the chances.....
  • A month into their trip, poor weather conditions caused engine to lose power, resulting in a damaged mast ????
  • The pair sent out daily distress calls that no one heard for nearly 100 days....what were they using?...it seems vhf, hopefully on 16
  • Group of sharks attacked their boat one night and a single shark returned a day later........did they ram it until their noses bled?....again it seems that's what they did...or some fish were eating the growth on the hull...
  • Appel and Fuiava, along with their dogs, were finally rescued by the U.S. Navy on Wednesday about 900 miles southeast of Japan after the treacherous trip
  • The women received medical assessment, food and beds aboard the Navy ship, where they will remain until the next port of call, the Navy said
  • Read more: http://www.dailymail...l#ixzz4wk1yarDp 
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  • good to see the dogs had their jackets on
  • 45BD24A800000578-5023025-The_USS_Ashland
     

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#13 Sabre

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 08:44 AM

It's all planned, now wait for the movie and book contracts, they will make more $$ per hour from that stunt than a house in Auckland....

Best theory I have heard yet. Would explain the confusing nature of it all. Very risky though.

A month into their trip their engine died but they thought they might be able to sail to their destination!!! Sounds like the makings of a really sh*t sailing book
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#14 raz88

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 09:54 AM

So I saw another interview with them which now I can't find the link for.  Based on the interview it seems like they are total idiots with absolutely no idea and either shouldn't have been out there or the story is fantasy. 

 

Apparently the motor was disabled by some rain(????!!), and the mast was somehow "broken" beyond repair.  Then they had to hide from sharks that "could hear them", and encountered "10 knot currents" mid pacific that meant although they could do 5 knots themselves they had no choice about where they were headed, all the while continuing to make distress calls each time they saw another vessel but nobody answered them.

 

From the growth up the side of the boat it kind of looks like it's been sitting on its side in shallow water somewhere, not actually at sea...


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#15 Berend de Boer

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 10:16 AM

In the mean time every fake news newspaper has printed this story and received the click bait. Job done!


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#16 Berend de Boer

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 10:41 AM

Here link to interview with a completely different story than you have seen so far: 

 

Forget everything you have read on the fake news sites. In this interview they appear to be knowledgeable.

 

It appears they had a force 11 storm on day 1 (hmm), then did fine for a long time, their spreader broke, but they arrived still fine in Kiribati. The boat was too big fit into the lagoon there they claim, so they decided to continue to the Cook Islands. Arriving in that area, and due to counter currents they decided to go North. That was May 25. They lost the ability to start the motor due to flooding of the boat caused by rain. Then they arrived in the "Devil's Triangle." According to them this was Tiger Shark territory.

 

 

They had two water makers, the first one failed.

 

Other's pointed out they had a wind turbine and solar panels, so that seems to have provided the power for the water maker.

 

Also the lady on the left claims she repaired this boat for 2.5 years before they set off for a three month cruise in the South Pacific.


Edited by Berend de Boer, 28 October 2017 - 10:47 AM.

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#17 erice

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 11:52 AM

so the rain flooded the cockpit,

the drains must have been blocked because the rising water in the cockpit then shorted the start panel

 

devil's triangle where tiger sharks eat boats

 

Dragons-Traiangle.jpghttps://www.marinein...agons-triangle/

 

seems they didn't scuttle as

"we left the bilge on and we're hoping to get her back"


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#18 lateral

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 01:47 PM

I'm none the wiser.

 

I still think they were boat body snatched, and now the aliens think we reproduce hermaphroditically

and our offspring bark.


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#19 erice

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 01:58 PM

hmmm...

 

they couldn't get in to the lagoon at kiribati

 

guess it wasn't the capital of kiribati,  tarawa, as in ww2

 

"Two minesweepers, with two destroyers to provide covering fire, entered the lagoon in the pre-dawn hours and cleared the shallows of mines" 

 

Marine battle planners had expected the normal rising tide to provide a water depth of 5 feet over the reef, allowing their four-foot draft Higgins boats room to spare.

However, on this day and the next, the ocean experienced a neap tide, and failed to rise.

In the words of some observers, "the ocean just sat there", leaving a mean depth of three feet over the reef.

Unfortunately, the task force commander had rejected advice from a New Zealand liaison officer with experience of the island that the tide would be unsuitable on the day of the landing

 

that mistake probably cost a few thousand

 

https://en.wikipedia...wa#cite_note-17


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#20 Knot Me... maybe

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 05:21 PM

I live in Kiribati for a while, you can get ships into the lagoon. In fact the Americans killed a shitload of themselves because they did just that, against the recommendations of 2 kiwis and a Aussie who knew the place very well.

 

That was the Battle of Tarawa.... which mostly took place on Betio and Bairiki, 2 of the lumps that stick up above sea level on the SW corner of Tawara, which is quite large. Most lumps are joined by causeways now.

 

There was a Japanese airfield on the Island they didn't want to leave behind them as they moved back westward across the pacific so they wanted the Japanese gone.

 

The Americans came into the lagoon to get behind some big guns aimed East but couldn't be turned around. The NZ and Aussies said best not too as it is shallow close to land, a bit like Cheltenham beach where the tide goes out 200mts. There it doesn't fully dry but drops to knee-waist deep. The Americans knew better so after 4 days of bombing the crap out of the tiny bit of sand, it's no bigger than Motuihe, by aircraft during the day and navy during the night. The Americans then jumped in the boats to go ashore thinking they would meet bugger all. But the Japanese had fortified their placed with coconut palms and layers of sand so were hardly touched.

 

The Americans got about 100mts from dry land and ran aground. They all jump out to wade ashore. The Japanese came out from their bunkers and mowed them down in their 1000's. Took 3-4 days to clear the island, as tiny as it was. 27,000 people died for a tiny tiny piece of sand in the middle of no where.

 

We dug 3 Japanese soldiers up when doing the footings. One was still in full uniform complete with gun, ammo, canteen and all his gear. Lost count of how much munitions were also found, much just lying on the ground.

 

They have a excellent archive on Bairiki with footage and photos. With many of the structures still there it was very easy to stand and see exactly where the bodies washed against the beach 20 deep in the waves, very sobering to think humans can do that to each other. My 'house' was 25mts odd from the still existing Japanese HQ bunker. Not a bad size very thick walled concrete structure.... with many holes in it.

 

But I digress... carry on.


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