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What boats does IRC like?


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#21 ballystick

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Posted 16 November 2017 - 04:37 PM

It will be interesting to see the number, the main aspect where IRC is not so user friendly is the difference between real life performance and the IRC number, especially looking at boats such as Farr 1020 compared with Ross 930s the IRC differences are huge with the 1020 being rated as much slower than the 930 but in real life it is much different especially when upwind sailing is taken into account. 

A modified version would be good and could be much closer to reality and NZ yachts I reckon.


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We cannot direct the wind but we CAN adjust our sails

#22 Kestrahl

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 12:07 AM

If you have a light boat that will take off downwind and in the right conditions (a race entirely downwind in decent breeze) will win by a big margin - IRC seems to take this into account. So for windward/leeward or a course changing direction the fast downwind boat will get smacked on rating. A Ross 930 is 2.2 ton, a Farr 1020 is 3.7 ton so there it is. 


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#23 Fish

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Posted 19 November 2017 - 07:47 PM

I think we might be underestimating IRC here.

It is highly likely KMM's boat will get one of the lowest TCF's known to man.

 

The IRC committee are fairly pragmatic. They know that, for a boat to win a race, generally, it needs to be afloat. I understand the requirements under IRC is that the boat needs to be in, or at least near to water.

 

Further, if KMM manages to fill the IRC form out properly, he will get a lower TCF again. However he might have trouble finding the correct box to tick in the form and may need to make a manual declaration. "Any boat with a shed permanently attached is unlikely to plane downwind, nor point that well upwind (should it actually be afloat in the first instance).

 

The IRC committee are well versed in boat of this type, typically the type "undergoing modifications" that "will be afloat in time for said race", but for some excuse or another, still have a shed permanently attached...


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#24 Knot Me... maybe

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Posted 20 November 2017 - 08:29 AM

It's a big, very light weight and handy shaped shed, I'd expect far better downwind performance with that than anything I currently can fly. It would have to fly off the masthead, I better up the size of the backstay.

 

Making a final call this week but the TT is not looking like the currently preferred option due to information recently read.... properly :angry:

 

Trying to make a race in the upcoming Akl- Noumea but no one seems to want to come and play.


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#25 Battgirl

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Posted 20 November 2017 - 10:14 AM

Sadly due to Waimanu's watery demise the TT is another boat down
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