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Building a house in NZ


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#11 Puff

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Posted 27 November 2017 - 08:11 PM

Some of those costs seem really high considering it is all done in software. Does it really take that long or do they have a huge charge out rate?


The original concept architect quotes us $46000 plus engineering. We parted amicably over a small issue important to us that he wouldn’t change and shopped around for someone to just draw the plans which by that stage I had modelled. All up we saved $10k as he also did the geotechnical work in his price.
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#12 wild violet

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Posted 27 November 2017 - 08:32 PM

Ive been building 17 years and have seen so many people ripped by architects,If you have a general idea of what you want go and see a draughtsman,usually more practical people with no agendas.Architects get bribes fron material suppliers to use there product and kitchen outfits pay them royaltys as well.Also if you can avoid parapits butinol and low pitched roofs,these keep me very busy,with leaks and rot issues.Hills are too be avioded too as they are all slowly meandering downwards.
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#13 MarkMT

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Posted 27 November 2017 - 09:13 PM

The old house had two complete kitchens which isn't allowed now in Tauranga.

 

TWO Kitchens!!! Thank goodness we have gummint to protect us from such despicable evil. Democracy be praised.


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#14 marinheiro

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Posted 27 November 2017 - 09:42 PM

Ive been building 17 years and have seen so many people ripped by architects,If you have a general idea of what you want go and see a draughtsman,usually more practical people with no agendas.Architects get bribes fron material suppliers to use there product and kitchen outfits pay them royaltys as well.Also if you can avoid parapits butinol and low pitched roofs,these keep me very busy,with leaks and rot issues.Hills are too be avioded too as they are all slowly meandering downwards.


My problem with architects charging a % of the build price is there is no incentive to keep the price in check. If I was to use an architect it would either be hourly rate or a fixed fee.
I also second Wild Violet about Butynol etc, do not ever build a balcony over a living area using framed construction, no matter how good the design you will have problems - been there, done that!
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#15 DrWatson

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 02:56 AM

I'm kinda lucky in that my architect (American) just finished her PhD on "Sociopolitical influences on concrete in Swiss architecture and public works" so she has a pretty good understanding of concrete. She works at the technical Uni here in Zürich.

 

She and I (we) are closely aligned on the style of house we're looking at and as a close friend she'll do concept and full design for nix, in exchange for unrestricted visiting rights. Just need to pay the engineers.

 

We're currently looking at ways to insulate cast in situ concrete walls that can be easily done in NZ. Currently we're looking at pouring one side as a tilt slab, standing it up, then sticking on insulation and pouring the next side in situ to tie it all together. Anyone got any ideas?


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#16 marinheiro

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 04:06 AM

Do it all on the ground and then stand the completed panel up , plenty of info on the web eg

https://thermomass.com/

and in NZ

https://www.composit...-concrete-panel

 

this alternative looks interesting as well

 

http://www.litecrete...e.html#featured


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#17 Puff

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 09:14 AM

Mate of mine in Whitianga built his house in concrete and cast the panels on his floor with foam insulation . Easy enough to do and his house is great.
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#18 Puff

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 12:58 PM

I'm kinda lucky in that my architect (American) just finished her PhD on "Sociopolitical influences on concrete in Swiss architecture and public works" so she has a pretty good understanding of concrete. She works at the technical Uni here in Zürich.

 

She and I (we) are closely aligned on the style of house we're looking at and as a close friend she'll do concept and full design for nix, in exchange for unrestricted visiting rights. Just need to pay the engineers.

 

We're currently looking at ways to insulate cast in situ concrete walls that can be easily done in NZ. Currently we're looking at pouring one side as a tilt slab, standing it up, then sticking on insulation and pouring the next side in situ to tie it all together. Anyone got any ideas?

Without a very good knowledge of the rules of the authority you are building in, the NZ building code and the council's interpretation of it, I doubt it will be as easy as you think. A friend of mine liked a show home he saw in Australia, had the full plans sent here and pedalled it around various draughtsman thinking they could fine tune-it into NZ speak. They all told him the plans were useless and other than the floor-plan, they would need to start from scratch. I follow closely the consent applications in Whitianga. You can tell what designers know the rules as they breeze through like ours. Out of area and group builders take ages and have huge problems getting their standard designs through council because they haven't taken into account the local rules.

 

But then neither might the council. Consent processing in Whitianga is shared between all the greater Waikato councils, or Christchurch, or Napier as ours was. The Christchurch team are asking for liquefaction reports, even picking out individual applications in subdivision.

 

Our plans are 36 pages.

 

The specification is 424 pages.


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#19 Fish

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 01:05 PM

Who has the time to read 424 pages of specifications, let alone assimilate the information. Reading 5 pages of specifications is enough to put most people to sleep.


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#20 Willow

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 02:38 PM

DrW I used to build Olympic sized swimming pools underground in the UK we used polystyrene on the earth side and closed cell foam on the inside as shuttering. The closed cell came off the next morning after the pour and the styrene stayed in place on the backside as insulation for the heated pool. Worked like a charm with coving and plastering applied afterwards. The main egineering challenge is in the steelwork massive amounts of it as they need to be strong enough to withstand quite a few tonnes of water.
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