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A plastic bag survey....ish


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#1 wheels

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Posted 04 December 2017 - 05:01 AM

Was just wondering. With so many of us out on the water, in everyones travels, just how many of those Supermarket plastic bags have ones come across??

Yes I have come across plastic bags and many other plastic bits of rubbish, but no actual supermarket bags. Not saying there will not be some out there, but still to actually see one myself.

I raise this, because of the big arguments of having them banned. 

  The following is my view of course. I think that those arguing the point are missing the mark completely. Yes we have a problem with plastic in the Ocean. I am not denying that. But I think these people are targeting the wrong point of the problem. But it shows just how much power the squeeky wheels have and the number of easily lead sheeple there are.


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#2 Steve Pope

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Posted 04 December 2017 - 08:12 AM

I've come across many many plastic bait bags, lots of mussel twine washed up on the shoreline, (Gt barrier) monofilament line, (picked up on anchor) but so far no plastic shopping bags. A huge amount of "plastic" comes out of storm water drains.


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#3 philstar

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Posted 04 December 2017 - 08:30 AM

I've been sea kayaking in Fiji in the yasawas and come across deserted beaches covered in plastic crap. 

lots of fishing debris.

In the hauraki gulf I keep coming across ex bait plastic bags, and plastic bottles.

 

Its a problem !!


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#4 Fish

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Posted 04 December 2017 - 08:45 AM

I've seen plastic shopping bags floating in the Weiti, and try to grab them where possible. Going to the beach is becoming a nightmare, the missus likes to pick up every piece of rubbish she sees, now the kids are getting into it, i.e. stopping to play with / pick up every piece of rubbish on the beach.

 

Wheels, my take on it is along the lines of raising awareness. The plastic shopping bags we get are all re-used as rubbish bin liners, and go straight to landfill. However, if you seriously look at the amount of plastic packaging that comes in your groceries, it really starts making you think. I don't support 'banning' plastic shopping bags, but alternatives need to be offered.

Even just getting sushi for lunch, the amount of plastic crap that comes with that. Just take your won lunch box and put the sushi in that. Disposable coffee cups anyone? Keep a 'keep cup' in your car (and a couple at home so you can have a clean one.

 

Banning stuff isn't the way, but really stopping and looking at what your actions lead to is a big thing. There was a story in the boating mag about a cruiser going to the islands and having a good look at the packaging waste they were stowing on board, and the thought of what to do with it while in the islands. It really starts to make you think, if you can't have your rubbish collected and taken away, what can you do to reduce the amount you have to deal with?

 

And yes, it all comes from stormwater, cause when litter is dropped, it washes down the road and into the drain at the next rain, then into the harbour for little snapper to try and eat....


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#5 Knot Me... maybe

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Posted 04 December 2017 - 09:11 AM

I've seen a plastic shopping bag 460nm from the closest dry land. We checked the distance in disgust. Also see a Maccas wrapper, fish bins, all manner of buoys and floats and 100nm off the BoI 3 balloons tied together 2.5 still inflated.

 

My war against packaging is full on. Offer me a plastic bag to put f*ck all in and you'll have wished you'd shot me dead instead.

 

 


Banning stuff isn't the way, but really stopping and looking at what your actions lead to is a big thing. There was a story in the boating mag about a cruiser going to the islands and having a good look at the packaging waste they were stowing on board, and the thought of what to do with it while in the islands. It really starts to make you think, if you can't have your rubbish collected and taken away, what can you do to reduce the amount you have to deal with?

Agree, banning will do little it's people that need to change.

 

I remember as a kid bugger all rubbish and we had bugger all plastic, the correlation has to be there. Going away with the famdamnly these days and bugger me the rubbish bag fills fast.

 

This boat tweaking lark/stupidity, the amount of plastic rubbish has been outstanding and definably not in the good way. I should have counted but I'm going to say maybe 12 plus full of what was pretty much just packaging plastics, a lot being that harder shell stuff. My inner greenie is not amused.

 

I now strip most excessive packaging off at the checkout these days and make it know to all around why. I used to get push back from management but haven't for while now.

 

Little by little a little becomes a lot.


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#6 dutyfree

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Posted 04 December 2017 - 01:37 PM

We do see a bit of plastic floating around on the Gulf, but as noted most is on the beaches and the mussel origin stuff shows up due to size.

 

We use biodegradable rubbish bin liners at home, have a worm farm and the recycle bin is full every two weeks.  

 

At a practical level, the BYO carry bags are a great place for mould etc if you don't clean them out every so often.

 

Rather than banning or charging me for a plastic bag, I would prefer to pay extra for a biodegradable one if we have forgotten to bring our own bags.

 

On the boat we have a dedicated rubbish locker and separate out all the bottles etc for recycling.


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#7 Chloe

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Posted 04 December 2017 - 08:57 PM

There is no bio-degradable plastic bags or other wise. "We" as in the people on this earth have every molecule of plastic that has every been produced still on the planet. 

 

The problem with single use plastic bags is they are made to degrade so you don't see them after a few days in the sun but the plastic it still there.

 

Take a single use bag and peg it down in your yard where the sun can get at it, and see how long it takes before you can call it a bag.

 

Sorry Robert Zimmerman. :wtf:


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#8 harrytom

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 03:32 AM

Plastic plastic and more plastic it is a problem.
What was wrong with the paper carry bag we use to get at the supermarkets??Oh price of it,plastic bottles common sight on the water so why not go back to glass?glass milk bottles oh thats right the milkman might get cut from a dropped bottle(could get run over too)as most of us can remember taking our beer/soft drink bottles back for the refund then run around the back of the store/hotel grab some bottles and off to the next shop.No no cannot have glass because those horrible boaties smashed them in deep water and the glass washes ashore and cuts Johnny's feet,but johnny could also drown.
At work we recycle the film wrap and asked the guy where it goes too,simple hampton downs tip because we in nz dont have enough recycled film to warrant the expense to install the machine to recycle it.Some does get used most gets dumped just like most recycling ends up in containers and sent overseas. May seem to be doing the green thing but leaving a carbon footprint which out ways the recycling.
The super market bag gets used a rubbish bag but if picking up 2 or 3 items I leave the bag behind,as taking a bag to the shop for groceries,really who would remember to put it the car or to take it instore with them?
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#9 DrWatson

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 03:57 AM

I've seen quite a lot of plastic shopping bags floating by, but in NZ, normally plastic shopping bags in up in the home after coming from the grocery store, and from there they more often end up in the trash. Plastic packaging on snack and takeaway food is more of a problem, as people aren't at home when they eat or open the packet, and are often just too plain lazy to go to the nearest bin or put it somewhere until they get to a rubbish bin.

 

We buy solid carry bags (2 bucks a pop) can get 20kg in each depending on what you buy, probably about 25L each, from the checkout. Use them all the time for tons of things. I carried 120 cans of tomatoes home about a year ago in two of these bags... (near killed me; 400m),

 

Or for 30c I can (and do) buy reusable paper bags with handles. can get probably about 10-12kg in each, but gotta walk carefully. Can get about 5-10 supermarket trips out of them before I use them for the recycling, then they get nasty and I put them in the recycling bin where I take the glass.


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#10 wheels

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 05:15 AM

 

There is no bio-degradable plastic bags or other wise. "

I think I understand what you mean here. If it is true plastic, you are correct. Although there are films that look just like plastic, that some bags are made from and they are totally biodegradable, But they are inferior to real plastic bags and often people complain about them falling apart. They tend to be a White film.
 

 

At work we recycle the film wrap and asked the guy where it goes too,simple hampton downs tip because we in nz dont have enough recycled film to warrant the expense to install the machine to recycle it.Some does get used most gets dumped just like most recycling ends up in containers and sent overseas. May seem to be doing the green thing but leaving a carbon footprint which out ways the recycling.

Actually we do have film recycling in NZ. In fact one of them is just 200m down the street from KM's business of CRA. But yes, there is a lot dumped, mainly because it is not economical to recycle for very simple reasons, like perhaps it has become dirty or it's too far to transport etc.
Very little plastic is exported. The only plastic that is exported is the clear stuff that of Fizzy drink bottles. That plastic is spun into Polyester yarns to make Carpet, Rope and Polarfleece etc.
Glass was dropped due to the expense of making a bottle and cleaning it for reuse. Milk cost would easily double or maybe triple today if we went back to the bottle. But yes, I would prefer a bottle too.

 

What was wrong with the paper carry bag we use to get at the supermarkets??

The answer to this one surprises many. It is between 5 to 7 times more harmful to the environment to make a plain ole brown paper bag than a plastic one. That is taking into account the cutting of the tree, getting to the pulp mill, the energy and Chemicals that go into making the paper and then the production of the bag. And recycling paper in NZ is as bad as trying to recycle plastic. There just isn't the places to do it. Yes paper breaks down...too a point. But it fills up landfills and landfill space is becoming a major now.

Also, I think many believe that landfills break stuff down to return to Soil. But this is not the case either. Some new landfills are created totally lined and they capture the gas and either flare it off or some larger ones use it. But many landfills are oxygen starved and packed down so much that they remain a solid lump of junk. Hence why plastics do not break down. Done correctly, Plastics can break down and can be consumed by certain bacteria.

But anyway, what my original question was about, is how common is the plastic shopping bag seen. I understand Peoples concern and applaud the fact they want to clean the world up. But I just think this banning of supermarket bags is plain nuts.
I was annoyed that on "The Blue Planet"last Sunday Night, there was film of Whales swimming among plastic shopping bags.My thoughts were, so if it is so rre to see these things, how on earth did they manage to film whats swimming among bags? Were these bags dumped by a chase boat so the Whales had to swim through them just for the Filming?? If that is the case, then it really upset me that they would do such a thing. A Marine scientist has already called them on the comments that the baby whale died due to the Mothers milk being contaminated by plastic. He stated that would be highly unlikely and it was irresponsible for such a program to make such comments. Of which I agree.


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