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Is it worth to the VHF radio have DSC function. Anyone use it?

Communication VHF DSC

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#51 Jon

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 01:40 PM

Yes we need your expired flares
Handheld but I can dispose of your para’s also
PM or text me and I’ll tell you where to leave them on my boat at Westhaven or if your elsewhere arrange to collect
We use them as a landing aid for the big red and yellow bird
In town they don’t want them as the Westpac doesn’t respond but it the real NZ often the people we are assisting aren’t next to the big red truck or if they are it’s a good way to direct the red bird to the landing spot which is often 100’s of metres away in a paddock.
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#52 harrytom

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 02:28 PM

It would appear I'm going to need to eat some humble pie.

But not in response to KM's post  ;-)

 

I'll pre-face this by saying I haven't been doing any competitive racing for a good five years, (based on the fact my oldest is about to turn five). Some may argue I've never done any 'competitive racing' that I'd direct you to the handicapper on that argument...

 

Since my flares last expired and needed replacing, the Yachting NZ Safety regulations have updated from 2013-16 to 2017-20. Full credit to Yachting NZ (maybe they were listening to my whining) - they have rationalised the number and type of flares required to be carried.

 

Where clause 18.7 (Flares) used to have parts:

a,

b,

c,

d,

e,

f, and

g

 

Clause 18.7 now only has parts:

a, and 

b

 

The main change is there is now no requirement to carry rocket flares. While this does mean I wont be able to welcome KM into Arkles Bay anymore, it does halve the cost of replacing expired flares.

 

For Cat 3, the requirements were:

2 red rockets

2 red handhelds

1 orange smoke

1 white handheld (or a good spotlight)

 

Now it is:

2 red handhelds

2 orange smokes

 

The cost has gone from $300 to $155.

The big saving is in removing the red rockets, which I believe are by far the most dangerous flare for personal injury for screw-ups while handling. Further, as I (and a vast majority of people) do the majority of boating during daylight, the extra orange smoke I think is not bad thinking.

 

So full credit to Yachting NZ on rationalising the flare requirements and halving the cost of replacement. I'm off down the road to buy a new set of flares.

 

And Beccara, absolutely agree, you always need a plan B, and at $51.67 / year the Cat 3 flares are now a more cost effective back up to the other safety devices.

I have a problem with what ynz have agreed to regarding no parachutes only needing red hand held. A parachute goes up how many hundreds of feet?and can be seen what 2 or 3 mile(I have no idea)a red hand held at night produces a glow at sea level and when in seaway effectiveness is reduced. very rarely get in distress in a calm sea,so what I am thinking 2 to 3 miles off (say between tiri/rakino)easterly 30 knts 1.5m swell vhf kaput,would it be visible from browns bay beach??

 

 

Now back to vhf


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#53 harrytom

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 02:34 PM

Found the answers to my own question via MNZ

 

  • Red handheld flares are effective during the day and night as they are very bright, burn for up to 60 seconds and are visible from aircraft
  • Red parachute or rocket flares are capable of attracting attention in daylight (up to 10 miles) and at night (up to 40 miles). The flare is launched up to 300m and burns for 40–60 seconds as it descends slowly under a parachute.

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The boss said "see you in the morning"didnt know he liked sailing


#54 Fish

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 02:38 PM

If you've never launched a red rocket before, try it,

Then try it in 30 knts. See if you can get it up to 300m, or see if it goes sideways faster than a sidewinder missile.

 

The YNZ regulations don't stop you carrying red rockets. You can carry them if you think there is a benefit. But now guys doing a Cat 5 race (and 4 and 3) don't need to spend the $160 on them.

 

And if you follow the regs, you should have a base mounted VHF and a waterproof handheld as well....


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#55 harrytom

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 02:48 PM

If you've never launched a red rocket before, try it,

Then try it in 30 knts. See if you can get it up to 300m, or see if it goes sideways faster than a sidewinder missile.

 

The YNZ regulations don't stop you carrying red rockets. You can carry them if you think there is a benefit. But now guys doing a Cat 5 race (and 4 and 3) don't need to spend the $160 on them.

 

And if you follow the regs, you should have a base mounted VHF and a waterproof handheld as well....

 I can see where YNZ is coming from by trying to make it simple/cheaper in the hope there is more competitors.  


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The boss said "see you in the morning"didnt know he liked sailing


#56 Fish

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 02:52 PM

 I can see where YNZ is coming from by trying to make it simple/cheaper in the hope there is more competitors.  

That, and I think with the improving reliability and increasing number of electronic options, rocket flares aren't nearly as important as they used to be.

 

The times, they are a changing...

 

We don't use sextants, hand bearing compasses (but probably should) kerosene lanterns or tyrelene sails anymore. They've all be replaced by modern equivalents.


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#57 Knot Me... maybe

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 08:00 AM


We don't use sextants, hand bearing compasses (but probably should) kerosene lanterns or tyrelene sails anymore. They've all be replaced by modern equivalents.

A year or 2 back the US military and a few others have gone back to teaching their navigators how to do it by Sextant and tables. The brass are concerned at how delicate the lectronic systems are to so many nasties they wanted a 'unconnected' option for what they see as a seriously major issue. With the poles swapping best you get swatting up on sextants as well.

 

Correct on the hand bearing, a cheap excellent way of sussing and no reliance on anything but yourself. But use with caution as when the poles flip ;)

 

Kerosene gone? 80% of the world does not have reticulated power. I suspect you may find a significant number, millions, who disagree with you. It is arguably the most common fuel used today... he says thinking all jets (and choppers) use kero. Maybe Diesel is, could be close though.

 

When you look up at your sails there is a huge chance you are looking at Tyrelene. Maybe Dacron but as both are names for polyester fibre it makes little difference.

 

Times change a lot faster in the Marketing and Advertising Depts, or those who they have got too, than they often do in real life ;)


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#58 Fish

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 08:52 AM

Given the US navy's track record of smacking into big ships and killing their own crew through outright incompetence, I wouldn't use that example to advance any points you want to make.

But that aside, yes I have a sextant, and have a vague idea how to use it. It doesn't expire every three years....

So along with your top shelf lithium batteries and super efficient Flexi solar panels, are you running kerosene Nav lights?

Or some of those modern LED ones?
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#59 Knot Me... maybe

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Posted 05 February 2018 - 10:29 AM

Given the US navy's track record of smacking into big ships and killing their own crew through outright incompetence, I wouldn't use that example to advance any points you want to make.

I would. It's well proven lectronics make boaters lazy and overly confident, we do see it a lot and we'll see a lot more yet. I love to piss with heads by turning off chartplotters and sneakily removing the fuse. The ensuing chaos is both scary in what is often no more than a pile of chooks running around with their heads cut off with no idea what to do yet in a twisted sort of a way it is bloody funny.

 

Sextants are like motorbikes. They teach you to be more aware, more precise, higher skilled when you move into the lazier options. They teach simple things like regularly make a mark on a paper chart with a pencil. Something they also bang into you in aviation nav and aviation use gear far superior and reliable to what marine uses. So I'd say the military people now being taught Sextant will be far superior, more flexible, better equipped to deal with failures or quirks navigators to those who only know lectronic. Just like most bike riders are superior car drivers than those who have only done cars.

 

I do have a small lantern that runs on those small gas cylinders, the same cylinders that my micro cooker uses. Both are part of my 'dead boat/survival kit'. I have liquid fuel ones at home but all bar the very odd occasion I don't see a situation I'd like to have that fuel aboard. I also have battery lights and the ability to connect my fixed mount lights to any power source like the batteries in my torch. I may even be able to hook my masthead to other power options, I haven't sussed.

 

The main thrust of using LED is the environment. We only emit decibels............and on occasions small highly localised methane emissions ;)


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#60 Fish

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Posted 05 February 2018 - 11:08 AM

The problem I've got now KM, is I actually agree with you.

Chart plotters in-particular breed a blind reliance on gadgets, and remove any sense of normal positional awareness. This is the sort of awareness that alerts you that something may not be quiet right.

Having sufficient ability to determine how strong and what direction a current is based on 'error's' in other nav methods is fascinating, i.e. sextant fixing being slightly out, being able to steer a straight compass course, and recording the log, all with sufficient confidence to know if the position fixes are out, it must be a current and not an operator error.

 

Many years ago in a far away land I was sitting a particular skippers qualification. We had to do 'blind nav' exercises, where we sat downstairs while the crew sailed the boat, we were allowed speed through the water, compass heading and depth (and a chart) and we had to get from our last known position to a safe location and visually confirm it, i.e. by sailing up to a channel marker of bouy. It was effectively a fog or lectronic shut down exercise. That really tests your ability, and confidence in finding where you are again. 

That same course had 'motor failure' exercises too. The instructor would randomly kill the motor when the skipper wasn't looking. He did it once in a busy, narrow shipping channel with a ferry coming in. That makes you think on your feet too...

 

Being a bit old fashioned, I've got all my waypoints marked on a paper chart. In the cockpit we have a chart plotter, but also a handheld GPS. Its on mains power normally, but has internal battery back up. All the waypoints on the chart are in the handheld, so its easy to get range and bearing to a known location. This gives reasonable positional awareness, i.e. we can see where we are on the paper chart as well as the chart plotter. Great for kids to look at by the way. Having the paper chart handy means its straight forward to confirm a position with a hand bearing compass should Kim Jung Ung take out all of the GPS satellites. And the kids can find the different posts and bouys on the chart and then watch them as we sail buy.


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