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"New" Marine Pest in Fiordland


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#1 Fish

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 03:42 PM

Southland Regional Council have banned anchoring in part of Breaksea Sound, and limit using moorings to 48 hrs.

 

The Asian Kelp was first found there in 2010, so the Council are now implementing new measures to control its spread.

 

I really don't understand this biosecurity stuff. I would have thought if its been here for 8 years already, hasn't the horse already bolted?

I don't understand why limiting time on a mooring helps prevent it spread. The mooring bouy is there all the time...

 

There is a restriction to dry your dive gear. That sounds a little more logical.

 

Its just a shame there is yet another marine pest in NZ, and the best we can do is piss into the wind on it.

 

 

http://www.radionz.c...iordland-waters


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#2 armchairadmiral

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 03:55 PM

Yes , the horse will have bolted. Probably reported in 2010 and its taken until now for some pointy head bureaucrat to process the restriction. Ran up against one last year when he tried to inspect our boat bottom.. I asked him what he was doing about the overseas ship bringing the stuff here on their ships. His reply was solid gold. We can't do anything about them but we can get you ! Classic NZ bureaucrat. Process is what counts,not the outcome!
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#3 wheels

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 05:03 PM

The Sounds now has two new invasive species also. A Japanese Sea Lettuce and some new form of Sea Squirt. Quite frankly, if they cannot stop these ships bringing the things into the Sounds, then they should stop the Ships coming in. So now they are spending Millions inspecting all the moored Vessels for pests again and of course, if they find anything, then they will force us to have them cleaned. Well they will be tough out of luck for me this time of they try to do that.


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#4 Elenya

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 08:00 AM

Sad to see the spread of such pests. The restrictions mentioned seem sensible.
1. if you don't stay in the small area shown for more than 48 hours it is less likely to pick up any weed growth on the hull and then risk spreading it elsewhere
2. if you don't use an anchor you cant' unknowingly move some of the weed somewhere else.

I doubt that a large ship brought this to Fiordland, more likely a small vessel coming from an area with weed growing there, a marina for example.

All vessels, large and small, have the potential to bring in pests, and to move them around NZ.

To put a context on a statement made above about "We can't do anything about them but we can get you". Border security for invasive pests is the responsibility of MPI so the Council has no ability to undertake inspections at the border. What councils can do is try to stop the spread of such pests that are in the country.

There are a significant amount of controls on ships entering NZ. I have seen several ships sent to the drydock at Lyttelton, after being stopped at the border.

If you keep your boat in an area known to have pest species (and that is most marina's in Auckland) then you are a prime candidate for spreading the pests if you don't clean your boat regularly.

It's obvious from the posts that none of want these pest destroying areas we sail in. We spent about a week anchored in that area on a previous winter cruise and it is a lovely spot.
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#5 Knot Me... maybe

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 08:27 AM

 if you don't clean your boat regularly.

Then I seriously hope that you and everyone else actively tell all the council, local and regional, happy clappies that THEY are actively forcing and encouraging the spread of pests due to poor thinking and simple lack of knowledge by removing the easy low cost options for bum cleaning.

 

Now in Auckland Super Shitty a bum clean cost many $100's and takes ages. If councils think boats will do that every 3-4 months they are dreaming.

 

Next time it pops up and some council happy clappy suggests removing more stuff ask them this question - Currently KM cleans his boat in the water, usually in the shallows of popular beaches. It takes 30 mins and costs $10 at most, why would he and it is realistic to expect him to spend a day and spend $300-400, or more, to do the exact same thing?. How about we put in facilities, using some of the millions of dollars being used to try and stop the spread, that allows boats to clean their own bums in a better and controlled manner i.e. purpose designed grids or similar?

 

Typical NZ bullshit, spend huge bucks to stop what a few bucks could have stopped even

happening.


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#6 Fish

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 09:42 AM

I had a conversation with the Regional Council staff manning the biosecurity stall at the boat show. There were staff from Northland, Auckland and BoP. Had to bite my tongue when I realised I was talking to the Northland lady...

Anyway, I did have an insightful discussion with the Auckland person regarding the provision of piles to dry out on.

She did concede it is very difficult to even book a haul out and wash in Auckland in the 3 months leading up to Christmas. SHe did concede the piles would enable a large number of yachties to actually clean their hulls, and commented it was "something they were looking at". I think the issue (for them) here is the cleaning and leaving of debris in the marine environment. If they accept that Auckland is already fully infested with Fanworm, then it wont matter if we leave fanworm atthe piles, but it does mean we can clean our hulls and not move it to Northland or BoP......

 

I also raised the issue of taking all the active ingredients out of the antifoul, but by this time I was getting into a bit of a whine mode. Their logic is they are waiting for technology to catch up to wait for biologically friendly biocides. Admiral aspiration, but also somewhat frustrating for a boat owner / maintainer.

 

Short story, if they just allowed the installation of piles, and allowed cleaning on piles, a large majority of boat owners could (and would) clean their hulls very regularly) i.e. 3 monthly.


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#7 ScottiE

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 10:28 AM

I always thought it would be easy to install a concrete wash bay with piles.  Once you've blasted down your boat just wash the stuff into a pit and shovel it into garbage bags for disposal.  Not really different to what's done on the quick haul at Panmure.  Bund only needs to be 100mm high.

 

Mind you, you would still need a few bays - running 24/7 - 1 bay only equals 700 vessels a year!


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#8 vic008

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 10:34 AM

And just take a warehouse tarp to lay down so you can collect your old barnacles for the garden. One side at a time.
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#9 wheels

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 11:21 AM

 

1. if you don't stay in the small area shown for more than 48 hours it is less likely to pick up any weed growth on the hull and then risk spreading it elsewhere
2. if you don't use an anchor you cant' unknowingly move some of the weed somewhere else.

I doubt that a large ship brought this to Fiordland, more likely a small vessel coming from an area with weed growing there, a marina for example.

Sooo, do marine species wait at least 48 hrs to ensure the structure they want to attach too is staying put??

Most people ensure the anchor is clean when they lift it.

Cruise ships are in and out of Fiordland weekly at the mo. It is very rare for small vessels to get there, apart from those that are resident to the area. Those that Sail down there tend to have a Sound boat, which also tends to mean and Clean Hull.


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#10 Fish

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 11:32 AM

But Wheels,

Cruise ships are essential for our economic well-being. The Tourist industry makes us all very wealthy people. That is also why Auckland Council 'need' to build a dolphin in the Waitemata, then build a walkway to it. Its not a wharf extension though, just a structure that sticks out into the harbour a whole lot, that ships tie up to.............

 

It would be extremely bad PR to say that cruise ships brought these pests here, just because they are going through Fiordland all the time, on an almost daily basis. Besides, the big Govt Ministry is responsible for border biosecurity, and they are very good at their jobs, don't have any funding issues and are agile and responsive. Nothing to see here, move along to the next topic please.


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