Jump to content


Photo

Katana


  • Please log in to reply
37 replies to this topic

#31 bazzathemammoth

bazzathemammoth

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 170 posts

Posted 08 February 2018 - 07:22 PM

Agreed. That is one of the things that I am sussing out with island time atm as well as a masthead tri color and new chartplotter. I think the AIS information would have been very helpful.


  • 0

#32 Island Time

Island Time

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 5,758 posts
  • LocationHome from Cruising, Now Gulf Harbour

Posted 08 February 2018 - 07:30 PM

AIS is great, but it only works on vessels equipped with it - although in the case above, the vessel had 2 masthead lights, so over 50m, it almost certainly would have. On the other hand, a radar with ARPA or MARPA works on any target, and gives CPA (Closest point of approach) and course and speed for the target.

Radar and AIS together give a great benefit in poor conditions...


  • 0

There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing, as simply messing about in boats


#33 Knot Me... maybe

Knot Me... maybe

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,512 posts

Posted 09 February 2018 - 10:23 AM


 

The first thing I can think of is that I could have altered our course earlier (even though I didn't think it was our responsibility and was worried about changing our course without knowing their intentions.  I also could (should) also have called them on channel 16 to confirm that they had seen us and determined their intentions.

 

Any other ideas?

 

I never assume the other boat knows the rules and/or will act on them even if they do. So in a situation like that I change course.

 

I had a very similar situation off Sydney heads and all the VHF did was get me a visit from the Sydney HM for a discussion about my language over the airways, I went off on 16 at the ship. But that did turn into the HM going after the ship. We had AIS but whether they saw it or not we'll never know. Had I a few more minutes (I was off watch snoring when the not that experienced crew woke me later than ideal) I would have fired a parachute flare into it's bridge, I was spewing big time and ready to hurt someone badly. We have no idea if the ship saw us or not but we reckon it knew we were there. I ended up putting the hammer down, doing a very high speed 180 degree turn and we skimmed down their side missing but 3-4mts.

 

The only thing I didn't do and would do if it happened again is bang off some white flares. They are hell bright and very unusual so if anyone was on the bridge they couldn't help but see them.

 

It's a tricky one for sure.


  • 0

#34 Island Time

Island Time

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 5,758 posts
  • LocationHome from Cruising, Now Gulf Harbour

Posted 09 February 2018 - 11:23 AM

If there is anyone on the bridge awake. A ship that sees you won't normally approach within a mile in open water. Many have changed course already before you see them - if you have ais and they can therefore see you.
Never ever turn to Port. Starboard preferably, stop, reverse course, whatever is required to avoid a collision.
I've had to avoid a large power vessel once, I'm sure he would have run us down rather than change course. Lit up his bridge with a spot, shined light on our sails etc, her put spot on us and just kept going. Be careful out there.
  • 0

There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing, as simply messing about in boats


#35 Myjane

Myjane

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 667 posts

Posted 08 April 2018 - 11:00 PM

On my last off shore I was on watch And spotted a light ,it was time to go off watch. The hole time I was in the bunk I started to here a deep boom boom boom noise, when I came up again it was about 4 in the morning just starting to be light on the horizon, I saw a ship on our corse parallel with us some three hundred mtrs away I could see through the wheel house and didn’t not look like anybody was in there ,then lost it again in the swell ,the next time I saw it we had to alter corse , , amazing how the noise traveled hours before ,,
  • 0

#36 southernman

southernman

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 361 posts
  • Locationnelson

Posted 09 April 2018 - 11:52 AM

My experience is that most ships around NZ see you miles before you see them, and if contacted on VHF will adjust course.  A Simple contact via VHF with ships name and their intentions and they are usually only too happy to adjust course or let you know their intentions.  AIS and radar together are great.  You certainly get an exact idea what is going on.  

 

The boats that are a pain are the fishing boats who seem to either leave AIS off or don't have it.  They also often don't acknowledge VHF calls.  We had one last week coming down from Napier to Lyttelton who was fishing and just kept coming at us, getting closer and closer, until I gave him the spot light on the wheel house and suddenly at 200 metres away changed course finally.  


  • 0

#37 Island Time

Island Time

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 5,758 posts
  • LocationHome from Cruising, Now Gulf Harbour

Posted 09 April 2018 - 01:28 PM

Hmm, SM. if it is a commercial fishing boat showing fishing lights, he has right of way.....


  • 1

There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing, as simply messing about in boats


#38 Chill Pill

Chill Pill

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 266 posts

Posted 09 April 2018 - 10:21 PM

We called up the Queen Mary 2 in the 2011 RNI in cook straight in 55knts and massive seas at 2am as they were heading straight for us. They hadn't seen us so we flashed a torch on their bridge and they altered course for us. Still think I owe that skipper a beer.


  • 1




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users