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Rigging questions

rigging running rigging standing rigging

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#1 mcp

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 06:57 PM

I have a few questions about rigging. 

 

I am replacing the standing and running rigging on a Nebe Miura 31

 

http://sailboatdata....p?class_id=7591

 

Masthead sloop. 

The boom/mainsail foot, is about a foot longer than the designer specified.

Furling 140% genoa [on its very last legs]

There is a single forestay, twin backstays, on a single spreader mast, with common garden variety setup of cap shrouds and two lowers per side. 

 

With the standing rigging.  I am currently thinking of replacing stainless wire rigging with the same.  What are the local options? What is the best type of wire rope and why? 

With regard to fittings, what are the key differences between swage fittings or norseman/sta-lok ends? 

As I need to replace rigging and the genoa, should I consider this an opportunity to install an inner forestay and converting to a cutter rig? or am I over thinking?

Do spreaders have a defined lifespan? Mine look heavily oxidised from deck level [Aluminium].

What do I need to know about the turnbuckles?

 

What else do I need to consider?

 

The running rigging is very tired also.

 

I do not need super high performance anything. I like simple, yet elegant solutions.  I would like longevity, chafe resistant, neglect resistant, naive resistant, running rigging. In that order of importance.  I don't mind paying a few dollars more per metre, for a better product.  My Grandfather was one of the biggest tight arses in this universe. He had a very good saying.  When you buy quality, you only cringe once. But there is always a point of diminishing returns. 

 

So,  what specific products should I be looking at?   I don't need a reason why in this case...Just the majority to agree. 

 

Should I take this opportunity to add some running rigging or change the way it is currently laid out?  

 

Currently, there is a fixed forestay. two rope spliced to wire halyards [one for the main, one spare], topping lift is spliced rope to wire, furler + one line either side, one cockpit mainsail reef [that doesn't really work. But that could be the operator], outhaul and vang.

 

I have two poles.  I am not sure what type they are or how to use them. I think they are both spinnaker poles. I have no other sails, other than the almost new main and almost dead genoa. 

 

In a couple of years time, I plan to do a lap of this country and then spend a few years sailing the tropics.  

 

I am very open to my assumptions and ideas to be criticised.  


Edited by mcp, 15 February 2018 - 07:01 PM.

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#2 vic008

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 07:27 PM

You need the services of a good rigger. If like me you will find your zhopping list getting shorter the more quotes come in. Could you revitalize your sheets and halyards in the washing machine. Stalock you can replace youself if you have the new cones. Pricey. Renew all splitpins. Turnbuuckles-free them up and put Lanocote? on the threads. Think everybody would say new rigging SS 1×18 wire. If you went the stalock way (I think about a hundy ea)you could do it all yourself if you are v competent
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#3 Island Time

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 08:43 PM

Ok, firstly, if you are going to get cat 1, you’ll need both the receipts for rigging work, and to do the work properly. The advice above of getting a good rigger is not bad. However, if you’re going to do this yourself, it sounds like a bit f a learning curve is ahead.
Spreaders don’t last forever, and the bases at the mast bear significant compression loads. If they are badly corroded, or you are in any doubt, then you MUST see a professional rigger. If required, they can make you new ones. Spreaders are way cheaper than a new rig,
Consider all the primary structures of the boat, keel, hull, keel bolts, hull deck join etc, and whatever you work on, take pics for the cat 1 inspector,
So presuming all that is good, the rig. Stainless 1x19 wire is the easiest and best. You can take the old stays off and take them to a rigger, and have him make up new ones. Swage fittings are cheapest, so getting a rigger to make them up is likely to be similar to making them yourself with swageless fittings. However, if you make them yourself, you can make new ones anywhere with just a spare cone and wire. Swageless is, IMO , a great idea on a cruiser. There are several options, Norseman, Sta-lok, searig and others. Check the pricing,
When you put the rig back together, it needs to be set up and tensioned correctly. I suggest you by Ivor Dedekam’s book sail and rig tuning, and follow the instructions in there....
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#4 mcp

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 09:12 PM

Ok, firstly, if you are going to get cat 1, you’ll need both the receipts for rigging work, and to do the work properly. The advice above of getting a good rigger is not bad. However, if you’re going to do this yourself, it sounds like a bit f a learning curve is ahead.
Spreaders don’t last forever, and the bases at the mast bear significant compression loads. If they are badly corroded, or you are in any doubt, then you MUST see a professional rigger. If required, they can make you new ones. Spreaders are way cheaper than a new rig,
Consider all the primary structures of the boat, keel, hull, keel bolts, hull deck join etc, and whatever you work on, take pics for the cat 1 inspector,
So presuming all that is good, the rig. Stainless 1x19 wire is the easiest and best. You can take the old stays off and take them to a rigger, and have him make up new ones. Swage fittings are cheapest, so getting a rigger to make them up is likely to be similar to making them yourself with swageless fittings. However, if you make them yourself, you can make new ones anywhere with just a spare cone and wire. Swageless is, IMO , a great idea on a cruiser. There are several options, Norseman, Sta-lok, searig and others. Check the pricing,
When you put the rig back together, it needs to be set up and tensioned correctly. I suggest you by Ivor Dedekam’s book sail and rig tuning, and follow the instructions in there....

 

I will not be doing this myself...I should have put this in my initial post....sorry. 


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#5 Island Time

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 09:16 PM

All good, then the hardest thing you have to do is find the right rigger- oh, and pay the bill! Where are is the boat?
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#6 mcp

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 09:25 PM

All good, then the hardest thing you have to do is find the right rigger- oh, and pay the bill! Where are is the boat?

 

Whangarei.        But,  I would still like ideas and suggestions....based on my questions so I can talk to the rigger and at least pretend to make informed decisions?  Especially on the cutter rig idea and running rigging?   Or just tell me I am over thinking it all and why?   


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#7 Island Time

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 09:49 PM

A removable inner forestry is a good idea for a storm jib, if the boat has a sufficiently strong designed in area for the base of it. Some boats it’s easy, some not so much.
If you can have it without serious structural work, then it might be worth it. It normally also requires the addition of runners to support the mast near where the inner forestry will terminate.
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