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#1 muzled

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 10:19 AM

This is quite interesting, I've always thought they were bloody invasive 'pests', and according to this guy that would be correct.

 

https://www.nzgeo.co...es-or-invaders/

 

New Zealand is the only country in the world where the mangrove is expanding its area of occupation. Is this expansion good for New Zealand’s marine environment? We don’t believe it is, because it appears to be occurring at the expense of other habitats, such as shellfish beds, sea-grass beds, flounder habitat and wading-bird habitat, as well as recreational areas such as sandy beaches and stretches of open water


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#2 native

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 10:21 AM

Mangoves? those little shits are wrecking our coasts. What used to be clear water bays are now stinky mud holes.


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#3 Veladare

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 10:22 AM

All mangroves must die


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#4 John B

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 10:46 AM

The hint of someone removing a mangrove a few years ago was enough to get a body charged and fined. Friends of mine with coastal property were warned and very wary.

Now you see local gummint or who? steam cleaning/killing the seedlings off mud flats. As seen at mahunga drive  around the pylons in the upper manukau harbour


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#5 wheels

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 12:06 PM

Have a read up re mangroves. There is a NZ native species that have been here for thousands of years. They offer a habitat to breading fish, where the eggs are laid and then the little fellows live in relative safety till they are big enough to roam out into deeper less protected waters. They also stabilize the silt within esturies to stop it being washed away.
The fact that they are spreading may well be due to other factors perhaps. Like something else has been removed from the waterway to allow the space for them to spread. I don't know, just a thought.


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#6 Black Panther

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 12:17 PM

Silt build up from clearing land upstream. The sand becomes mud then they take over. Easy to see where I live.
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#7 Sudden5869

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 12:44 PM

I was under the impression Mangroves flourished when silt runs into the estuary and harbour.  The additional silt makes it easier for the Mangroves to take hold.  

Whangamata Harbour is an example of this with the forestry surrounding it.  

We an encouraging Mangroves with our use (misuse) of land.  


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Oliver Sudden - Young 1034


#8 Knot Me... maybe

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 01:08 PM

War on Mangroves is being allowed in some places now, good on them, nuke the bastard things.


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#9 Black Panther

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 01:32 PM

I was under the impression Mangroves flourished when silt runs into the estuary and harbour.  The additional silt makes it easier for the Mangroves to take hold.  

Whangamata Harbour is an example of this with the forestry surrounding it.  

We an encouraging Mangroves with our use (misuse) of land.  

Agreed. Mangroves are a symptom , not the cause.


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“If we don’t change our direction, we will end up where we are headed.”

 


#10 erice

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 05:00 PM

at little shoal bay

 

they seem to have come up with a reasonable solution

 

ie not all or nothing

 

the locals have been allowed to carve out mangroves from a nicely slopped sandy bit to make a beach for the kids to play in

 

but leaving the other 90%? on the mud for small fish to hide behind, oxygenate the water? and consume? some of the nitrate run-off


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