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Mangroves


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#11 The big T

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 05:15 PM

Mangroves can be frost tender - Roundup I think gives the same gradual die back. Just saying.


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#12 Vorpal Blade

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 05:38 PM

The results of that effort really needs a photo but I reckon it was a complete waste of time . I'll get a pic when Im there over the weekend. 

It has left the "beach" as unusable as it ever was and a bald patch of mud with the vertical root-sprouts bits still poking out of the mud and hardly appealing. 


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#13 harrytom

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 05:49 PM

Yes there is a species of mangrove exclusive to NZ,mangroves grow north of Tauranga from memory.They provide a habitat for fish to hide,unlike the tropics etc where fish actually come in to the shallows to breed,They do not do this in NZ.

 

The thought was fresh water killed them when cut and rots the roots but how do explain the ones growing by the old Kopu bridge in Thames in a paddock??they have clear most from Pahurehure lagoon but some greenie claims to of found a foot print in the mud from an endangered bird, Most of the mangroves have gone and the silicone sand beach is returning.But the mud needs to sucked up and removed,someone in council said remove the mangroves and the tide will flush out the silt.Hmm yes that will work on the out going tide and when tide changes will come back in I would of thought. 

Bayswater marina was suppose to of gone ahead mid 70s but didnt due to greenies saying it will effect the ecology,whats the results of the ecology now the marina in in??bet the crabs still in ngataranga bay along with flounder,bet the old devonport tip is still leaching out toxins.


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#14 DrWatson

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 06:21 PM

Have a read up re mangroves. There is a NZ native species that have been here for thousands of years. They offer a habitat to breading fish, where the eggs are laid and then the little fellows live in relative safety till they are big enough to roam out into deeper less protected waters. They also stabilize the silt within esturies to stop it being washed away.
The fact that they are spreading may well be due to other factors perhaps.



This is correct. I think there may even be two species if my memory serves me correctly. Mangroves also hep prevent against storm surges, and a number of other important things. Shallow harbours without mangrove buffers suffer higher levels of algal bloom. I.e. sea lettuce
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#15 Steve Pope

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 08:01 PM

Mangroves are natures reclamation machine.


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#16 Kevin McCready

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Posted 16 June 2018 - 09:58 AM

LOL. An old article from 2004 by a coastal engineer with a vested interest in mangrove removal.


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