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Advice for 40s couple with health problems wanting to cruise


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#11 Fish

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Posted 10 June 2019 - 08:50 PM

And fun.

Says the man living on a boat and cruising around.

I'm not jealous... lalala...I'm not jealous...


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#12 bluesail

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 10:17 AM

Thanks for all the good information and kind words. And to JimS for the offer to go out. Would love to try and take you up on that if we could somehow sort out making the weather and air travel play nice together.

 

I tried to make my first post short and had to leave out a few bits so as to not put everyone off.

 

Our initial idea was to buy a boat as a liveaboard, renting a slip in some marina so my wife could continue to work. She works from home now over the internet so thought that would be great idea. However, I soon found that every single marina I called had over a year waiting list. Many just flat out stopped taking liveaboards. I got the feeling from managers that I was a fool for even asking.

 

We had planned on getting experience and upgrading the boat for blue water sailing for somewhere between one to two years. But reading the regulations around CAT-1 left me worried. The vision requirement would be an issue, and possibly my other health problems. And if I understand it, CAT-1 also has 30day expiration that you must leave and as soon as you hit international waters, it expires as well. This would make our idea of having a home base and doing shorter passages much more complicate and expensive. And don’t get me wrong, I fully agree with many of the classes required and wouldn’t want to sail without learning that as well. Just the “red tape” that bogs CAT-1 down for us.

 

As for funds, yes it also needs to be sorted. Buying a new house up north is possible, but with mortgage and then no extra funds for a boat. Selling here and renting would work, but burn through our cash fast.

 

I also agree that is a major challenge. We have done some research for income while cruising, even the coastal only options. Our last idea was to outright purchase a very cheap house and do reno work ourselves. Then turn it into rental for some income. However, doing that we’d still need to build up enough cash for the boat after so might take four or five years.

 

Had this been 20 years ago might have convinced my wife to parade around in a bikini for youtube views. I think we will need a more creative approach. Would love any suggestions on income while cruising coastal or otherwise. Is liveaboard an option anywhere? I think we have to move if for nothing else than easier access to boats. It is just how and where that is the question.


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#13 curly12

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 10:44 AM

We have a very active and large percentage of liveaboards here in Whangarei. Just counted in the 30 boats around the berth I am on we have 22 that are liveaboards.

 

You couldn't get to much further away from where you are now thou. I would suggest ringing and talking to a cat-1 issuing agent, a meet up with them and talk about your options would be a good step in starting your plans.


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#14 Aleana

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 12:42 PM

Well done for the bold plan to try a different lifestyle. And for taking a considered approach to the various hurdles - yes there will be challenges both the standard liveaboard cruising ones plus some extras relating to your health. But from the limited info you’ve shared so far plus your obviously pragmatic approach, I think it’s do-able.

Agree with the advice to start with a NZ cruising plan to build you skills and confidence and the if it all ‘feels right’ then consider graduating to offshore and everything that comes with that.


Hauraki Gulf and further up into Northland are the obvious choices due to cruising-friendly environment (especially for beginners) and easy access to services (marine and other).

We cruise this area a lot (unfortunately not as liveaboards) with a young child with health issues and we carry some equipment and special drugs onboard - but it’s also good to know we are a relatively short helicopter ride away from Auckland / Starship Hospital should we need it.

In terms of marinas, have your tried Marsden Cove? I know some liveaboards who recently moved there after being priced out of Gulf Harbour Marina - maybe worth giving them a call?

Finally, on choice of boat. Obviously available budget will be your biggest factor (purchase and running costs) but also think about style of boat. I’m not sure how familiar you are yet with different yacht drsigns but in short there is a world of difference between a coastal cruiser and an offshore capable boat. And so if you insist on bring a boat that is already Cat 1 (or easily within reach) you might find it’s not necessarily the easiest liveaboard for coastal cruising and frequent marina visits. As I said it’s dependent on your budget but if and when you feel like sharing some ballpark purchase figures you’ll no doubt get lots of good recommendations from this forum on design choices that might meet the brief.

And small might not be the kindest. Yes smaller boats (like trailer sailors) have lighter loads which might be a key factor with your shoulder problem - but a bigger, heavier boat will have a more gentle motion on the water that is easier to live with long term - and a bigger boat can handle more of a chop at anchor before you need to find a more sheltered spot etc.
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#15 raz88

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 07:02 PM

But reading the regulations around CAT-1 left me worried. The vision requirement would be an issue, and possibly my other health problems. And if I understand it, CAT-1 also has 30day expiration that you must leave and as soon as you hit international waters, it expires as well. This would make our idea of having a home base and doing shorter passages much more complicate and expensive .


In terms of cat1 - an offshore ocean voyage to anywhere from NZ is a major undertaking. NZ is far away from everything. If you plan to have a base somewhere and do 'shorter' passages then you can go from place to place in NZ. For this you don't need cat1 (although plenty of the passages around the NZ coast should be respected and need equipment, experience and planning).

If you are thinking of a home base in NZ and 'popping' off on a short passage to Tonga or Fiji - you may have to rethink. This kind of passage is a serious undertaking and most do it once at the start of the season (may-ish) then stay up in the islands for the rest of the season and come back in (Oct-ish). This means cat1 only lasting one exit is not a problem for most.
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#16 bluesail

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 10:17 AM

Thanks guys, I have left messages with Marsden Cove and Whangarei Marina and waiting for calls back.  The liveaboard option seemed like it might make most sense since we could hopefully get some work while learning to sail and getting used to the boat life.  That said, when I tried to get confirmation on available slips for liveaboards I hit a major snag.

 

As for boats, my wife dreams of a cat due to the large amount of space and openness of deck house.  I'm 188cm tall so need something with a bit of headroom would be great.  And the movement sounds easier for non-sailors to adjust due to less rolling.  However, our budget would likely be 80-100k and that is just outside most of them.  Have to consider the fees for haul-out, marinas and maintenance going way up for multihulls as well.   On the other hand I've seen a fair amount of monohulls on trademe for that price range that are not only very nice but also blue water ready.  Length wise, 10-12m seems to be the sweet spot in my totally inexperienced view.   :D 

 

I really like the layout of this Davidson 42's companionway for someone with arthritis. 

https://www.trademe....-1978092254.htm

 

Originally we thought working for six months in NZ then try and cruise the other six.  Then got a bit worried when reading about costs involved with getting cat-1.  With the haul-out, inspections, etc. needing to be done every year.  Then I see the costs for entry into the islands are getting more dear every day.  Even restrictions (like Vanuatu) are also getting worse for cruisers every day as well.  Wish I that we had tried this 10 years ago. :( 


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#17 Tazzy Devil

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 11:23 AM

Just another thing to think about.... you have health concerns. If it gets worse and you can’t stay on a boat you have something that will cost you $3-10k per annum at least (maybe more) that could take a year or more to sell and you won’t get capital gains.

For boat number 1 there is sense in buying a coastal cruiser- say a d28 or Stewart 34. Loads of boats around in the $25-30k price point. Lot’s simpler for diy maintenance. Cheaper to park and insure and if you lose 50% of purchase price no biggie. If you get desperate $1 reserve and you will have had a cheap adventure.

Chartering for a week or two offshore makes more financial sense sometimes.
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#18 lateral

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 01:45 PM

Just another thing to think about.... you have health concerns. If it gets worse and you can’t stay on a boat you have something that will cost you $3-10k per annum at least (maybe more) that could take a year or more to sell and you won’t get capital gains.

For boat number 1 there is sense in buying a coastal cruiser- say a d28 or Stewart 34. Loads of boats around in the $25-30k price point. Lot’s simpler for diy maintenance. Cheaper to park and insure and if you lose 50% of purchase price no biggie. If you get desperate $1 reserve and you will have had a cheap adventure.

Chartering for a week or two offshore makes more financial sense sometimes.

 

 

 

Yep thats sensible, and get a dinkum surveyor so you are not buying someone else's problems.

Bearing in mind, the above boats will not be that convenient to live aboard.

Have seen some bargains come up lately.

 

First go on someones elses boat for a 2-3days/nites in average+ conditions to

get a perspective on it.

 

DO NOT buy in a hurry, even a free boat can be a hellva  imposition.

Look long and hard before you buy.

Don't buy a project boat unless you prefer working on it to sailing.

If you can't sail it hard, get someone you trust that can & go test sail it HARD.

Its foibles will come out of the woodwork.

If the owner blanches, walk away.

Do NOT fall in love with it before due diligence.

Massive online help info is out there.

 

I have a feeling sailboats are not the cheapest live-aboard vessels.

BUT, the most exhilarating & fun, but often demanding.

Be realistic on what boat skills you can develop.

Cat 1 requires considerable experience to leave for the islands, both x% crew & skipper.

 

I'm on the fence at moment on registering OS to sidestep the mileage bureaucracy thing.

But will try and get a RNI in before heading OS.

Lots of nice coastal cruising to be had  around NZ.

 

My wife has has similar problems to you and has decided that it is too strenuous for her. (63yro)

Perhaps I am somewhat of the problem in what I expect out of a sail in terms of making the boat go.

Obviously you can sail at a more comfortable angle of heel, or wait for better conditions if required.

She also suffers from seasickness & migraines.

Although, where there is a will, theres a way!

 

I bought a boat on impulse, and it cost me a ten year rebuild.

I could have bought 3 boats for what I spent.

I am under no illusions; I will lose bigtime if I sell. (Which is never

because it will be handed down to daughters)

If it gets me to the islands I owe it.

 

Allow 5-15k/year for berth-maintenance depending on what you started out with and frugality.

from what I have gleaned.

 

M2CW.


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#19 raz88

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 03:52 PM

Allow 5-15k/year for berth-maintenance depending on what you started out with and frugality.
from what I have gleaned.

M2CW.


Maybe even more depending where you plan to be. A 12m berth at westhaven is already nearly 10k a year on it's own. Add insurance on a 12m 100k boat and a haul out and you're pretty much at 15k without really buying anything.
And in my experience when you buy a boat despite them surveying ok and not 'needing' anything when you buy them, inevitably you'll want things to get it how you want it which will cost $$ in the first year or two.
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#20 Black Panther

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Posted 14 June 2019 - 08:10 AM

https://www.outsideo...cular-dystrophy
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  Two figures sat side by side, staring at the Sea. One said to the other, “You know that one day we will die.” And the other friend replied, “But all of the other days WE WILL LIVE!”

 





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