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Mono Heel fatigue vs Catamaran SLAP, oh to dream canter keel cruiser


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#21 Jon

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 08:30 AM

Agree with Booboo we beat every cat on every leg from the med to NZ
Often larger cats by days, 2 from Galapagos to FP
Cats win at anchor but that’s it, sure you can make them faster by lightening them up but your cruising and a lot of that gear is or maybe needed
Where the cat losses every time is when you go to park them
At 15.4m by 4.9m our boat is about spot on for volume and as long as the winds in the 20s apparent we do 200nm days back to back at any angle, 130deg is the nicest thou, we had that for 5 days, and did over 1000nm between G and Poly
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#22 Priscilla II

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 09:04 AM

Colin explaining Lagoon 450 weaknesses about a minute in.
https://youtu.be/4y-9ea9Nwwc
How do you rig a preventer successfully when your boom is so damned high.
$1500 pm Westhaven marina fee no thanks.
Crikey what would be the cost to haul and hard stand.
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#23 Island Time

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 10:20 AM

I too agree with Booboo and Jon. Even Island Time was faster on most passages than most of the multi's. Multi's have an unusual quick motion in a seaway - I had to go up the rig of a 45ft multi in a reasonable seaway - only half way up, but came back down with some pretty good bruises, due to the fast motion. Would have been a much easier task in a mono, where the arc would have been more, but not so violent it was hard to hold on....


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#24 1paulg

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 12:09 PM

I think one has to bear in mind that probably around 70% ( I am guessing here but probably not too far off the mark) of Cats are production Cats whose main purpose is to provide a "comfortable environment" at anchor which they definitely achieve above Monos (plus more anchoring options with shallow draft) often with modest sailing - most non performance cruiser type cats will normally be around same speed (or slightly slower) reaching or running as a similar sized mono but slower upwind. Although a different motion which can be uncomfortable for some it is probably less stressful doing activities like showering, cooking and every day type stuff when you arent leaning . Cooking on a Mono in a sea isnt  very easy.

 It would need to be a pretty quick Mono performance  cruiser  to keep up with a similar sized performance cruising Cat sailing eased sheets .

 Trade wind sailing with a nice swell on your quarter is a lot of fun  on a Cat that can take off and surf.

 Agree with Jon - parking a Multi in a marina is always going to be a more expensive exercise


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#25 Black Panther

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 12:14 PM

Probably shouldn't compare multis and monos of similar size. Maybe boats of similar cost?
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#26 Jon

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 01:36 PM

That won’t work as Paul stole his boat and it isn’t a typical cruising Cat (it won the coastal against all multi’s)
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#27 1paulg

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 02:52 PM

That won’t work as Paul stole his boat and it isn’t a typical cruising Cat (it won the coastal against all multi’s)


That was on a generous handicap !
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#28 Jon

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 08:09 AM

Here’s another forum discussing this topic almost
Some more info for you
My take is production cats suck upwind and are almost as fast as a mono down wind, possibly faster on a reach. If you want a cat that sails well you need boards and lightweight high end build.


http://www.cruisersf...tm_medium=email
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#29 darkside

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 08:39 AM

To get performance sailing out of a cat my list would be in order:

1. light weight

2. long skinny hulls (if there is a double bed in the hull, the cat better be over 60')

3. bridge deck clearance

4. powerful rig to overcome the extra drag in light airs

5. last of all dagger boards

A well designed mini keel can work quite well. However virtually every cat with boards also ticks the top four points as well so the boards get all the kudos, not sure they deserve it.

To get a cat big enough to carry the weight required for cruising on those skinny hulls, I think a minimum of 45' if you want sailing performance.

That's also long enough to have nice enough double berths on the bridge deck.

Cat's are not cheap to build light and long and powerful so as BP suggests you will be comparing with a pretty big mono for the same money.


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#30 Priscilla II

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 07:51 PM

Mumby 48 Alloy.
https://www.multihul...mby-48-shindig/
Attached File  45C09130-5B48-4112-AD75-02B3C601762B.jpeg   197.56KB   0 downloads
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