Jump to content


Photo

Wood tiller finish


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 lateral

lateral

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 914 posts
  • Locationauckland

Posted 08 October 2019 - 06:59 PM

Last meticulous prep now looks like shite.
It was several coats of west with uv hardener
(407) and six coats of vanish. Didn’t last more than 18 months
And at 3.5 yrs looks like a case of leprosy.
Any proven formulates?
Should have had a cover.
  • 0

#2 Black Panther

Black Panther

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 5,744 posts

Posted 08 October 2019 - 07:31 PM

Sand and revarnish with polyurethane, like they use on wooden floors. Then get a cover.
  • 0
  Two figures sat side by side, staring at the Sea. One said to the other, “You know that one day we will die.” And the other friend replied, “But all of the other days WE WILL LIVE!”

 


#3 MartinRF

MartinRF

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 256 posts
  • LocationStockholm, Sweden

Posted 09 October 2019 - 04:41 AM

I know you live in a sunnier place than I do but still I think it should have lasted longer. What type of wood? Oak and epoxy for instance is non-trivial to make work in my experience.

 

Then we have tho option of KISS. If swelling/shrinking with variations in humidity is not an issue for this tiller I would consider good old one-pot varnish. Yes, it will need to be re-done on a regular basis but it is not hard work. A cover will extend the service interval considerably.

 

/Martin


  • 0

#4 Black Panther

Black Panther

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 5,744 posts

Posted 09 October 2019 - 06:10 AM

Ordinary varnish two coats wvery 6months.
  • 0
  Two figures sat side by side, staring at the Sea. One said to the other, “You know that one day we will die.” And the other friend replied, “But all of the other days WE WILL LIVE!”

 


#5 Terry B

Terry B

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 681 posts

Posted 09 October 2019 - 08:43 AM

I took my tiller back to bare wood 6 years ago, epoxied 1 coat then only 4 of spar varnish.

Then got a soft sunbrella cover made. 

Still looks like new (apart from where I dropped the boom on it  :roll: ).

 

It's the cover that protects it I reckon.


  • 0
TERRY

We live in a society where pizza gets to your house before the police do....................

#6 Vorpal Blade

Vorpal Blade

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 973 posts

Posted 09 October 2019 - 05:33 PM

When you have finished varnishing it take it to someone to make a fitted cover for it, then install tiller on the boat -  much cheaper than having someone go to the boat and measure/make.


  • 1
for awesome custom made fabric products
http://www.coversandcanvas.co.nz

#7 rigger

rigger

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,521 posts

Posted 09 October 2019 - 08:05 PM

Strip back, 80 to 100 grit,
80/20 thinner/varnish ~ couple of coats

50/50 same

Then 6 to 8 coats for a total of no less than 10.
It may be worth wet sanding after 4 coats for a better finish then another 4 coats.
Get a cover for it, if not wet sand 400 grit and 2 coats every 6 months.

Schooner or gold spar / similar
  • 0

#8 mcp

mcp

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 188 posts

Posted 09 October 2019 - 09:02 PM

It was several coats of west with uv hardener
(407) 

 

207?  ........407 is a fairing compound.  

 

And like above, sand + polyurethane varnish.


  • 0

#9 lateral

lateral

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 914 posts
  • Locationauckland

Posted 10 October 2019 - 06:28 AM

Sorry, Yep 207.

So seal coat of epoxy not worth the extra work it seems.

I have ADH30 hardener to make it MORE flexible?


  • 0

#10 tuffyluffy

tuffyluffy

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,378 posts

Posted 10 October 2019 - 08:47 AM

Timber tillers will look great for at least 5 years with 5 coats of Cetrol . . . . and a cover.

 

As others have said, a cover will save you a pile of maintenance


  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users