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Foreign owned yachts


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#1 vic008

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Posted 25 December 2019 - 10:12 AM

What are the laws for foreign owned boats leaving NZ nowadays, as far as Cat 1. etc apply?
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#2 mcp

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Posted 25 December 2019 - 10:21 AM

What are the laws for foreign owned boats leaving NZ nowadays, as far as Cat 1. etc apply?

 

Foreign flagged vessels have no requirement for CAT 1.    But I believe you could be stopped from leaving if your boat is a heap of crap and there are some serious concerns about its sea worthy-ness.


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#3 Island Time

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Posted 25 December 2019 - 10:43 AM

Yep, nz authorities are still required to issue a port clearance form....
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There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing, as simply messing about in boats


#4 grantmc

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Posted 04 February 2020 - 03:52 PM

I think that was an improvement in process after the loss of the Nina with 7 lives lost. Much criticism at the time about the condition of the schooner and yet NZ authorities were (seemingly) unable to prevent her leaving. 


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#5 Island Time

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Posted 04 February 2020 - 06:57 PM

Nope, clearance form is called a Zarpe, clearance doc given on exit, required to clear in to almost all ports internationally. Nothing to do with boat condition... It means you have cleared customs and paid your port fees. Been used for a long time.


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#6 marinheiro

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Posted 06 February 2020 - 11:43 AM

I believe under one of the international maritime agreements, a country's national marine body has the legal right to detain a vessel if it is not considered to be seaworthy. I know this has been exercised in Australia a couple of times, and possibly NZ with some of the dodgy chartered foreign fishing boats


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#7 Island Time

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Posted 07 February 2020 - 10:51 AM

Agreed. They occasionally use this to detain vessels. Any sovereign nation can arrest any vessel within their waters if they wish. This has been done on a few occasions, but it's pretty unusual for NZ, and the boat concerned, if detained due to condition, must be pretty bad!


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