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MuzzaB

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  1. Like
    MuzzaB got a reaction from Rehabilitated in Old pics   
    My first time solo on a Laser.  I weighed about two feathers at the time and was 11 or 12 years old.  I persuaded one of my father's friends to let me borrow his near-new Laser (check out that low sail number).  Mid '70s Oakura Bay, Northland.
     

  2. Upvote
    MuzzaB got a reaction from harrytom in Who is this?   
    No. Not a NZ V class. She was (is) from the South West of England.
     
    https://nmmc.co.uk/object/boats/falmouth-quay-punt-curlew/
  3. Upvote
    MuzzaB got a reaction from ex Elly in Skipper wanted for Auckland to Wellington   
    As a complete sidetrack - just because I cannot let little "facts" like this go by uncorrected, the vessel that the Blakes (newlyweds at that stage) were aboard in this storm was Condor of Bermuda, which had been Heath's Condor in the 2nd Whitbread race the previous year.  Burton Cutter was in the first race.  She was certainly hove to for a period, but I don't believe she was "almost lost".  Yes - it was certainly a nasty storm and the seas I experienced remain the largest I have ever experienced, though they were not dangerous where we were (our position was east of North Cape and at least 48 - 72 hours sailing away from both Condor and Smackwater Jack) - just very very big.  We had a different experience from the boats in the Tasman.
     
    During the period Smackwater Jack is supposed to have been lost (by which I mean the time frame - not the certainty of her loss) we were in shelter and at anchor in Whangaroa Harbour.  I remember sitting anchor watch in the cockpit watching the needle of our analogue anemometer stuck at its maximum of 60 knots - just sitting there with the needle hard against the stop.  It was the middle of the night.  I don't know the maximum gust we encountered but do remember leaving the cockpit to try to prevent halyards - already tied back from the mast - from banging loudly.  I could only crawl along the deck, even though we were in flat water (you all know the Pekapeka Bay arm of Whangaroa).  At that time both Condor and Smackwater were still west of Cape Reinga.  If I recall it is believed that Smackwater was still about 500 miles west (I may be wrong - it was 36 years ago).
     
    I also remember being very nervous earlier as we entered Whangaroa in the last of the daylight, with the seas breaking on either side like nothing I have seen before or since.  Three or so years later, when Lionheart was lost while trying to make Whangaroa on her way back from Suva (another severe storm event) I remember thinking "There, but for the grace of God..."
     
    We were not in contact with either vessel but were listening. We and others heard earlier normal traffic concerning both boats and we think we heard Smackwater the previous day but given the distance we probably heard a relayed message.  As I recall, nobody heard a later distress call from Smackwater though she had reported some degree of "trouble".  Others may well recall this better than me.
     
    I did not want to hijack this thread earlier with my irrelevant sidetrack, but now as the OP's question has been addressed and concluded, though I would just slip this in.
  4. Upvote
    MuzzaB got a reaction from Battleship in Skipper wanted for Auckland to Wellington   
    As a complete sidetrack - just because I cannot let little "facts" like this go by uncorrected, the vessel that the Blakes (newlyweds at that stage) were aboard in this storm was Condor of Bermuda, which had been Heath's Condor in the 2nd Whitbread race the previous year.  Burton Cutter was in the first race.  She was certainly hove to for a period, but I don't believe she was "almost lost".  Yes - it was certainly a nasty storm and the seas I experienced remain the largest I have ever experienced, though they were not dangerous where we were (our position was east of North Cape and at least 48 - 72 hours sailing away from both Condor and Smackwater Jack) - just very very big.  We had a different experience from the boats in the Tasman.
     
    During the period Smackwater Jack is supposed to have been lost (by which I mean the time frame - not the certainty of her loss) we were in shelter and at anchor in Whangaroa Harbour.  I remember sitting anchor watch in the cockpit watching the needle of our analogue anemometer stuck at its maximum of 60 knots - just sitting there with the needle hard against the stop.  It was the middle of the night.  I don't know the maximum gust we encountered but do remember leaving the cockpit to try to prevent halyards - already tied back from the mast - from banging loudly.  I could only crawl along the deck, even though we were in flat water (you all know the Pekapeka Bay arm of Whangaroa).  At that time both Condor and Smackwater were still west of Cape Reinga.  If I recall it is believed that Smackwater was still about 500 miles west (I may be wrong - it was 36 years ago).
     
    I also remember being very nervous earlier as we entered Whangaroa in the last of the daylight, with the seas breaking on either side like nothing I have seen before or since.  Three or so years later, when Lionheart was lost while trying to make Whangaroa on her way back from Suva (another severe storm event) I remember thinking "There, but for the grace of God..."
     
    We were not in contact with either vessel but were listening. We and others heard earlier normal traffic concerning both boats and we think we heard Smackwater the previous day but given the distance we probably heard a relayed message.  As I recall, nobody heard a later distress call from Smackwater though she had reported some degree of "trouble".  Others may well recall this better than me.
     
    I did not want to hijack this thread earlier with my irrelevant sidetrack, but now as the OP's question has been addressed and concluded, though I would just slip this in.
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