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Interesting. Been here before as clients have asked for all flexible hose in a land based residential gas system and it will not get  a CCC so voids your insurance. Gas needs to be signed off.

 

Not so with boats for private use it seems:

Rang Baileys Insurers for clarification and they stated that boat insurance differs from house, in-as-much

 the owner/skipper/captain is deemed to be responsible for designing/implementing/maintaining the systems on a boat for safe operation.

If it is proved to be ill conceived/negligent, you are on your own.

 

Insurance co's may vary.

 

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Not so with boats for private use it seems:

Rang Baileys Insurers for clarification and they stated that boat insurance differs from house, in-as-much

 the owner/skipper/captain is deemed to be responsible for designing/implementing/maintaining the systems on a boat for safe operation.

If it is proved to be ill conceived/negligent, you are on your own.

 

Insurance co's may vary.

Hmmm not sure you would be able to plug that loophole if the boat caught fire. I would expect the arguement would be, the boat blew up due to a gas leak, so you must have been negligent.

However, There is indeed a code of practice for Gas installs on boats and Caravans.

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One would think that if a flexible hose is acceptable from bulkhead to an oven which moves constantly then surely a continuous flexible hose routed in a chafe free manner with one join at  the reg and stove ends would be a better system.

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What scares me about copper is corrosion but mostly the joins. I can't braze it insitu so that means compression or similar joins...... in a structure that bounces about the place and could move. Over time I see join leaks followed by fire balls.

 

Copper would mean, worst case

- regulator - join - flexible hose - join - copper hose - join - bulkhead thru fitting - join - copper hose - join - bulkhead thru fitting - join - converts to flexible some how - join - stove.

 

Best case is we can get away without the bulkhead thru fittings. Still a lot of joins though.

 

Flexible means

- regulator - join - hose - join - stove

 

The tube, if flexible will be visible but tucked in a corner that would be very hard to get into. Copper would have to run in a location someone climbing into a 1/4 berth shitfaced could easily touch it or even use it is a handle.

 

I can't see any good case to use coper over flexible, as long as it is good flexible with properly done ends.

 

 

 

Why do the ads down the side show blow up sex dolls, apartments for sale and Gyms? Either someone's been on my machine or Google is doing Meth :)

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What scares me about copper is corrosion but mostly the joins.

 

Use silver base solder.  Which ideally, you should be using on pressurised copper gas piping anyway.

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Over the length you are talking KM, you would only have copper in one length. No joins other than the hose at each end. Bulkhead fitting should only be a gland that stops the copper moving in the hole and wearing through.
At the tank, you should have an electric on/off valve that can be turned off at the galley and also turned off by the Gas detector if it triggers it's alarm. Then you have the regulator. The join is sealed with a joint sealant. Then you have the Flexi hose coupling to the reg and the Flexi hose to the copper. At this connection, a fitting is usually welded to the copper that allows the Flexi Hose to couple to the Copper. ( I don't know which, if barbed connection or threaded is used here). Then the same at the Appliance end and finally the appliance itself. If you have a fixed gas stove, you can use copper right to the appliance. If it moves, then you have to have flexi.
Copper is subject to corrosion, yes, but it is very robust at the same time. It will outlast flexi hose. There is also copper and good copper tube. But most reputable plumber involved in Gas installs should be using the good stuff. There used to be a poorer grade running around that used to fail with pin holes due to poor copper grade.

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The problem with copper is it is not flexible so with both ends needing to be flexible why not just make the whole thing that way. I could do both ends and have copper in the middle but doing that means joins and hard to hide away safely for maybe a 1500mm length at most, it seems pointless. No way can copper be at each end, can't physically work and even if it did the plumber would have to be about 600mm tall and more flexible that bungy cord :)

 

I'm chatting to a gas dude in the morning so we'll see what he reckons.

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