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rossd

Mid 70s Kauri logs

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rossd - good for you. And I can see how your seagull will blend in with the rest of your set-up in terms of age, style and authenticity. Which I’ve got no problem with. Some of my favourite sailing memories were on old, wooden vessels which smelled of a nostalgic blend of wood, varnish, and paraffin. My only issue is when mission-critical stuff breaks down. And our Seagull broke down a lot - and it was our main engine not the dinghy outboard (we only had oars). Hence it went swimming in the end ????

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rossd - good for you. And I can see how your seagull will blend in with the rest of your set-up in terms of age, style and authenticity. Which I’ve got no problem with. Some of my favourite sailing memories were on old, wooden vessels which smelled of a nostalgic blend of wood, varnish, and paraffin. My only issue is when mission-critical stuff breaks down. And our Seagull broke down a lot - and it was our main engine not the dinghy outboard (we only had oars). Hence it went swimming in the end

So is my o/b mission critical? Just used oars up to now but where i am moored now a lot of the time when wind and tide marginal I just cannot make it under oars, maybe a hard dinghy would.  looking back there has been a couple of times I have been a bit fool hardy by drifting  down with tide and wind , using the oars to make sure contact is made with bow or anchor rode and one chance to grab something or else drifting off like that woman in the Med recently. Couple of back up measures, A line and float of the stern, or better still I have a little lie flat anchor to deploy should the target be missed. Handheld VHF wouldn't go astray either.    

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So is my o/b mission critical? Just used oars up to now but where i am moored now a lot of the time when wind and tide marginal I just cannot make it under oars, maybe a hard dinghy would.  looking back there has been a couple of times I have been a bit fool hardy by drifting  down with tide and wind , using the oars to make sure contact is made with bow or anchor rode and one chance to grab something or else drifting off like that woman in the Med recently. Couple of back up measures, A line and float of the stern, or better still I have a little lie flat anchor to deploy should the target be missed. Handheld VHF wouldn't go astray either.    

Stick with the Seagull ,Aleana has obviously crossed over well away from the heady blend of wood varnish and paraffin which in my view are the soul and grace of yachting.

Yup you can sit on your yoghurt pot revelling in your enclosed in clears power assisted cockpit flight deck auto anchored electric furling bow thrusted wonder but it will never deep down inside ever have the feel of a wooden log.

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If it’s a dinghy outboard for Gulf cruising I’d say it’s not mission critical. You will nearly always have options whether to go or not. And if it fails you will usually have time and options to recover things. But if you were regularly carrying a dinghy full of precious passengers eg kids, on long dark cold river trips then I’d say you’re pushing your luck.

 

Like I said before, my experience was using a Seagull o/b as the primary engine for driving (or not) a 18ft family trailer sailor in tidal Solent waters. Given the modern alternatives we have today I doubt anyone here would sign up for that now despite the armchair nostalgics here.

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Crikey Aleana last time I looked out of my cockpit armchair nostalgics were in short supply.

If it works don’t diss it.

It (Seagull) didn’t work for me. So yes I will diss it.

 

Anyway, nostalgia isn’t what it used to be.

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Like you "Aleana" had a seagull on a trailer yacht,worked fine in a tank but put it to use Hmm. Either go or not. Had enough of the damn seagull so while going through tiri passage and wanted to motor,after several attempts and fails it meet its match.It just fell off in to the depths never to resurface again. Best thing I ever did.

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Seagulls are great artwork to hang on a cafe wall, as for boating they are an environmental disaster. I am an advocate of the Yamaha 2 horse, unkillable and at 100:1 but no oil changes, its not that harsh on the environment. I justify it by not having the extra kid we considered once :)

 

As for dugouts, Ive said this many times 70's triple skin boats are the best of the best of NZ wooden boats in terms of  skill and craftsmanship and they are dirt cheap for what you get.

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