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Problems with safety equipment


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So if the Spinlock Clips are not suitable for use on the required anchor points should they be acceptable for passing your category inspection?

Should the inspector (or YNZ and therefore Maritime NZ), knowing they are not fit for purpose, accept them?

In a perfect world they meet some ISO standard and would only ever be subject to a perfect load, by the time you have fallen off or been swept out of your boat you are a long way from a perfect world. Would be nice if your safety equipment could cope with that.

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Someones getting paid off big time to keep these on the market.

Found these articles, very informative, I think your right IT but apparently most clips on the market will do the same. You need to read all three to get the whole picture. Just read the last one if y

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7 hours ago, Island Time said:

Im not sure that that IS is spinlock clip

Found these articles, very informative, I think your right IT but apparently most clips on the market will do the same. You need to read all three to get the whole picture. Just read the last one if you need info on what to choose - hint Spinlock didn't cut the mustard in several ways.

https://www.practical-sailor.com/blog/safety-tether-clip-in-caution

https://www.practical-sailor.com/blog/tether-clip-update

https://www.practical-sailor.com/safety-seamanship/safety-tethers-under-scrutiny

"Based on our testing, a variety of locking clips that are certified as meeting the ISO 12401 Standard for racing sailing tethers, World Sailing Small craft – Deck safety harness and safety line – Safety requirements and test methods, do not appear to comply with the portion of the standard (quoted below) that is used to establish that the hook can not easily release from a fixed attachment point by accident."

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9 hours ago, Island Time said:

Im not sure that that IS is spinlock clip. This is;

DW-STR/2LE/C

Well I took my  image from a marine testing article that represented the clip as being Spinlock and the article was about the fiasco on the Clipper Ships Around the World man-overboard tether break. This is especially bad when you read the full  account linked on the Clipper site. This clipper ship had so many 'issues' aboard that one crew member left mid way in South America,  instead of continuing on his ( they cost up to $80,000) race around the world passage. 

I have compared the CrewSaver clips aboard our boat to the Spinlock my wife uses.  I did this just yesterday for the first time. Guess what? The Spinlock is  dramatically thinner when comparing the Spinlock to the CrewSaver clip.

Now... I have no idea of the tensile properties of the stainless in either of these clips, there are tremendous differences between the exact same looking stainless shackles when comparing standard shackles to H.R. (High Resistance) stamped shackles. So I can't say that the CrewSaver is way better. But it sure is about 30% to 40% thicker. There are allot of other issues involved here because the Clipper Ships switched to another brand of tether afterwards, arguably because they were concerned about the Spinlock brand..... However they then switched back to Spinlock for unstated reasons.  I would assume it could either be sponsorship issues, or more likely because the Spinlock clips are so easy to use (un-clipping and re-clipping).... but I have no idea

My point is >>  Why don't manufactures use  a clip that is stronger

It would be really easy to design one that withstands a much higher side load than 200 kg.

Edited by 2flit
clarity and grammar sp!
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And this complete tether  (https://www.kong.it/en/2-products/items/c4-components/f41-sailing-accessories/p764-elastictetherevodouble) tested much better. Here is a quote from Practical Sailor:

"To our testers surprise, off-center loads don’t have to be great to bend a snap hook open. In our tests, the Gibb-style hooks like the Spinlock Race Clip that Speirs was wearing began distorting under axial (side) loads as light as 275 pounds. At 300 pounds the hooks were fully open. As a comparison, carabiners used by rock climbers like the Kong Tango sustain loads up to 2,700 pounds before failure, and about 1,160 pounds when nose hooked."

So we go from 136 kg on a Spinlock up to 526 kg with the Kong tether clip. A 380% improvement.

Kong.It Teather.png

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