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Good beginner boats?

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Yep, I'll definitely have a look at the ones nearby (anywhere in Auckland or surrounding areas basically). Do people generally put boats up for sale on TradeMe? Or are there a bunch to be found that's only listed on the boards of different sailing clubs? I'll probably drive to several marinas to see if I can find any for sale that aren't listed on trademe I guess.

 

Not really looking to buy any time soon honestly. I'm in the process of trying to find someone who needs a crew and doesn't mind a newbie, which as you can imagine is fairly tough. I'm even willing to help out doing manual work to repair the boat too, since I want to learn as much as possible about the boats, so I thought I'd have an easier time finding people, but not much luck so far. I want a bit more experience before purchasing a boat.

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Have a look at the harmonics they are one boat that looks small on the outside and heaps of room on the inside. There is a couple on trade me and are around 10K mark. Just another one for you to look at.

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Have a look at the harmonics they are one boat that looks small on the outside and heaps of room on the inside. There is a couple on trade me and are around 10K mark. Just another one for you to look at.

 

How do they compare to the other boats I mentioned in terms of safety/ease to sail? I noticed the two on trademe, but I can't seem to find much info on Harmonic keelers, so I wasn't sure.

 

Btw, maybe a silly question, but is a keeler the same thing as a trailer-sailer? I'm trying to stay away from trailer-sailers.

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Trailer sailers are (usually) lift keel/centreboard yachts. Keelers are (usually) fixed keel and (usually) stay in the water except for when maintenance is required.

Not sure why you're trying to stay away from them (trailer sailers) though - any reason? They do offer some advantages - especially if your budget is tight.

 

If you are wanting to try different boats and meet owners and like minded newbies then I can recommend you and your partner contact Richmond Yacht Club (just google their site and email them) and do the "Friday Night Friendly" series. You join the series and you get to go on different yachts each Friday. All very friendly - lots of newbies plus experienced skipper. You'll learn a lot and have a lot of fun.

 

I was recommended to them and I've done it - great fun, good people and great food in the clubhouse afterwards!

Uuuumh, I might have had a beer or two as well......... :lol: :lol:

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If your budget is tight I really would recommend a trailer sailer. A keeler is going to cost you at least a couple of grand a year to keep in the water once you've paid mooring fees and maintenance - lots more if you prefer a marina. Trailer sailer you can park at home, no annual anti-foul etc.

 

There are some really solid trailer sailers out there. The Farr 6000 is a great little boat, but quite expensive (probably for good reason). Plenty of room inside. I've heard the Aquarius is a good boat. The Nolexes are faster but less roomy. I have friends who sailed for 20 years with two children on their Young 7m and I think they still looks back on it as a more enjoyable boat to sail than their current keeler. http://www.trademe.co.nz/Trade-Me-Motor ... 752150.htm

 

Sure, a trailer sailer can capsize more easily than a keeler but the sort of conditions that a beginner is going to head out in aren't going to cause too many problems. You can get as far as Barrier if you're sensible and you can chuck it on the trailer and go to the bay of islands, Taupo, Rotorua, even the South Island if you feel so inclined.

 

Good trailer sailers have a much better resale potential than keelers so if you spend a couple of years on one then decide you do need more space or want to cross oceans you can easily upgrade.

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My sailing instructor just recommended beginners to stay away from them if our main concern is safety/stability. I also don't have a car/truck powerful enough to pull a trailer-sailer, so it'd actually turn out to be more expensive up-front. Though, I suppose I could trade in my current car, but even then, I use my car to drive to the city daily, and a powerful truck would eat up more gas, so it'd probably also be more expensive overall.

 

I keep seeing "centreboard" yachts mentioned, but still don't even really know what that means either. Yeah, I'm a newbie, lol.

 

The "Friday Night Friendly" is a great recommendation, I had no idea something like this exists!!! I wonder if there are similar things for clubs that are closer to where I live. I'll definitely try giving it a go!

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Where do you live?

 

Thursdays @ Ponsonby Cruising Club in summer meet at 3pm for 4pm race start.

 

I work only 4km away from the Ponsonby club, but even then there's no way I can get out by 3pm. I don't understand how so many people can participate in weekday races during work hours. Would love to help out after-hours or weekends, but I imagine so would everyone else who can't do Thursdays, hehe. :cry:

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I agree, that trailer sailors aren't all bad. A few of them gave the breed a bad name a while ago and people who don't know too much about them think they are unsafe. A club member is selling a Catalina - now they are seriously good boats. Take a look at http://www.weiti.co.nz/Brokerage.htm It's the Catalina, a big bang for the buck. Give him a call.

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Curiously, what did you end up buying?

Aha... now you're asking...

 

I was pretty close to buying a tidy little Tracker in Auckland, and even put in some ridiculously low offers on a Farr 920, and thought long and hard about doing up an un-loved Ross 930...

 

Then a friend recommended a boat that his mate was selling - an older 30 foot wooden 'half-tonner', originally designed for offshore racing. Wasn't exactly what I had on my list - e.g. I wanted a GRP boat, not a wooden one, and the cabin layout wasn't quite what I had in mind, but the chance of buying an offshore-capable boat with my coastal-cruiser budget was too good to miss, so I bought it. Now I'm planning to sail round the world on her. It's funny how things turn out!

 

But yeah, you'll be surprised how quickly you whittle down what you're interested in once you've started to get on board a few boats. Try Tony at Westhaven Marine Brokers - he showed me around a LOT of small boats at Westhaven when I was looking at buying.

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