Jump to content

GOP boats vs GRP


Recommended Posts

So my search for the right boat continues. As much as a Cat appeals parking is an issue and the convenience of the local pile moorings is appealing, so back to looking at monohulls.

 

There's a couple of interesting boats that are GOP (T28 and a Young 30) that I'm thinking of looking at that leave a bit of cash left over for other bit's and pieces.

 

I'll be getting a survey done but would love to hear from experienced Crew.org people on whether these older GOP boats are worth considering. I think Spencers are the same construction too?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Most GRP boats are production jobs and designed to allow for the weight, although a wooden version will often be lighter. Years ago my Harmonic spent a couple of years stuck on a mooring without being used, grew a mussel farm etc. I hauled out, waterblasted, new antifoul, rolled a couple of coats of of Marinecoat on the topsides, oiled the teak toerail, fixed a few minor bits and re-launched. On the hard stand I was parked not far from a guy with one of the very early DD wood Harmonics. He was digging out rot and bogging it when I hauled and he was doing the same when we launched.

 

Both materials have their issues; ply boats can get rot, glass boats can get osmosis. A lot of 40 YO NZ built glass boats have ply components so you can get the worst of both worlds if you're unlucky. Best thing is to buy a boat that has been in continual use and kept maintained. You might pay more for a boat that's been kept up to scratch, but that 'bargain' that's been sitting abandoned on a mooring for ten years may swallow a lot of coin to rejuvenate and make reliable - whatever its built of.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like wood but having spent the last 18 months striping down a glass boat that's 30 years old. I'm pretty sure I'd have had found a lot more issues if it was GOP. In fact all the possible dodgy bits in mine that have been totally replaced due to age degradation have been plywood. Those bits of wood aside we have found zero age related issues to any of the other structure. My boat is also considered by some to be a lightweight flyer, which it may have been 30 years ago, so it's got a foam core and isn't solid 25mm (whatever) of glass. It's also spent it's life being thrashed by yobs and it's still fine. I've even had the dudes who survey ferries, ships etc for Maritime NZ go over her and the results was 'excellent, no problems at all'.

 

As much as I like wood and I've built a couple in it, I am very impressed at how my old beast has stood the test of time. With the current tweak I can not see any reason she still won't be going fine in another 30 years time. 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to agree with that KM. Ideally a GOP boat was epoxied on the INSIDE as well. There are still some good examples around, but you'd have to have a careful look (if you know what you are doing) or a survey (or both!).

 

In my comments above I was thinking more  of solid GRP (Like a Raven) rather than a cored construction. Cores can have issues as well, and in some cases ply has been used as a core.

 

It's interesting that in my boat (Coremat hull, Divinicell deck), in some of the interior joinery, where ply has been used, with just a light coat of varnish on top - like bunk tops- it is falling apart. Not because it is wet, but after 30 years it has dried out and the glue in the ply is failing! The bits where it was used as backing plates and encased in epoxy are still fine., but the dry bits are weak as.. Replacement bits I've done are epoxied BOTH sides - and edges of course! Replacement is ongoing...

Link to post
Share on other sites

A well known boatbuilder told me back in the 80's to watch for plywood problems in some of the popular types. He thought that some of the ply used was going to be letting go 20 ( or 30)years in , as some of it was not necessarily proper marine ply.

But , on the other hand , they are pretty easily repairable.

The glass boats have the pox to deal with and that's been attacked by all sorts of people for the last 20 odd years too. I remember an H28 next to us on the hard in about ooo late 80's or early '90's. The guy shaved the thing down so far with his grinder that you could literally see him moving through the boat above the ballast.

 

I thought that thing was going to fold down over its keel like a gumboot with a brick on top.

 

Lots of well built cold moulded boats out there. Good timber helps longevity , kauri for example over ply cold moulded. More tolerant to abuse as mentioned previously.

 

2 skin , 3 skin and ( as a gift to y'all) 4 skin as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

bought some sails off a reasonably cared for 3 skin kauri boat 

 

broken up as had succumbed to freshwater rot of the inner skin

 

presumably over its long life

 

someone hadn't taken enough care sealing the gunnels?

Link to post
Share on other sites

A well known boatbuilder told me back in the 80's to watch for plywood problems in some of the popular types. He thought that some of the ply used was going to be letting go 20 ( or 30)years in , as some of it was not necessarily proper marine ply.

I'd agree with that. Most of the ply I removed from mine had some, small but still there, glue line issues/failures. BUT none of it was proper 1088 marine bonded ply, most was just bog standard and untreated. Most of the glueline issues were in the areas that got the most moisture but I have no idea if the failures were water related or just coincidence.

 

They were also in areas where the ply was more 'strips' then 'sheets' so to speak if that makes sense. Just thinking if the boat twisting and/or racking and so on may have been a input, not that we ever saw any twisting/racking though.

Link to post
Share on other sites

So I really like a Townson 28 so will have a close look. It appears well maintained (thought the interior looks dated).

 

The consensus I'm picking up is that if it's been used and loved it could be a good sound boat and provided i keep on top of it all I should get a plenty of years out of it, but be prepared for a bit of work if stuff goes bad?

 

If the boat checks out, I'll get a survey put over it and if that's all good then maybe a good sand back, paint and new squabs down below and I may be looking at a good family cruiser.

 

Then again for not much more coin I can get into a D28 and a wee bit more I could look at the E7.9 Fx. or wait till an SR26 comes up (missed Spacestation waiting for funds to be released overseas grrrrrrr.....)

 

 

So many options, so many compromises to make!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wood is good but must be properly built and maintained. If fresh water has got into it rot is a problem. Our boat is built in 82 from 3 skin kauri with ply decks and has no rot at all but is well maintained ie lots of dollars thrown at it and built by the Lidgards who have a reputation second to none.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...