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Dragging/Anchor unset etiquette


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Ok so just got into a bit of a situation that stumped me.

 

We've been anchored up a few bays around from Russell for the past few days riding out the blow, Yesterday another cat came and anchored up nearby but far enough we were comfortable, Dumped a CQR and a pile of chain on top of it then pull tested it.

 

Long story short today when the wind swung from the NNW to SSW/SW in the space of 5 minutes it looks like their anchor became unset for a short while and now they were around a boat length away from our stern on the swing. We weren't quite sure what to do, They weren't on the boat, It was hard to tell if they were still dragging or had reset.

 

What's everyone's view on what to do here? Pick up and leave? Call the CG? Chuck out your backup anchor for them?

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I'd probably pick up and move a bit then keep an eye on their boat till they returned in case it moved again (if it did, go kick another anchor over for them or dump some more chain). Then when they return row over and explain the situation, you might make some new friends.

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That was something I hated with Auckland Boaties. They gave no consideration for wind change when they anchor. Many don't understand that with a 180 change, the anchor often lifts out, slides along he Bottom for a bit till it resets. Of course this all depends on the Anchor type, the bottom type, the amount of chain and so on. Sometimes an anchor can turn while set, but not always. You always have to consider the safety of yourself first. If you aren't happy, you up and move.
NEVER go onboard or do anything with the other persons anchor if that other Boat own is not there and has not given you permission. If something went wrong and their Boat drifted, even if you improved the situation but it still dragged anyway, you would end up being the one responsible. If the owner is onboard, then you could certainly try and offer help if you think they are doing something concerning. But of course, they may not always be accepting of advice.

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I'd move. And for the safety of their boat I'd go aboard and let out more chain and warp. I'd document what I'd done in my log. If anything later went wrong and they tried to sue, I could point to my log and show I'd acted in a seaman-like, public spirited and responsible manner  - the same way as if it had been a good friend's boat.

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What BP said.

 

I'd have absolutely no problem hopping on a drifting boat in an effort to save her. I've done it a few times, mostly with boats breaking off moorings in crap weather but 2 from anchor. Not one owner wasn't grateful I/we did.

 

If someone sat there and watched mine drift off I'd be very pissed off. If they tried their best and still failed then so be it, at least they tried and whatever they did had to have been better then what I could, which was nothing if I wasn't there. 

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We had our spare anchor out with it's 100m of rode ready to go on deck, We ended up just monitoring/putting fenders out and thankfully the crew turned up about 30min later. By this time it looked like the anchor had reset.

 

I think if it was clear she was completely free or dragging alot we would have moved our boat first and then gone over hooked our 2nd anchor up to the bridle but doing anything to someone else's boat is not something I'd consider lightly, Saying that I'd hate for our boat to break free and someone to just watch.

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I think we all would help and want someone to do the same for us. But just be aware, that if the other boat had a major incident afterwards and ended up on rocks, it is not the owner that would pursue you. It is his insurance company.
I dunno, maybe instead of documenting in a Log, it would be better to have no evidence at all and say, nup wasn't me.

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Sorry state of affairs but that's the blame society we've created. "NZ the way we wanted it " if I recall a political slogan from yesteryear. I've rescued a few boats dragging and generally was appreciated. One or two were ho hum but that's OK. Our boat dragged once in the Hauraki Gulf  when a wind change of 180 degree put her on a lee shore and we were out fishing with friends. In a crowded bay no one made an effort to do anything but watch and point as she dragged towards the rocks. Luckily we got to her with superb boat handling by our friend and boarded her from weather about 2 mins from disaster. For me I couldn't watch  such an event and do nothing so I guess I'd just have to take the grief and rap if it came.

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Interesting topic.

Recently anchored in Mansion house at Kawau there was a yacht that when the wind swung was incredibly close to the rocks between mansion house and two house bay, when the breeze kicked in it either dragged or straightened out its chain and was seriously lucky not to be on the rocks. - No owners to be seen, boats in the bay kicking off horns etc to draw some attention from owners.

 

A RIB from a Riviera went over and tried to tow it to safety, but wasnt having much luck and lacked the towing power/ weight to pull it. Luckily they held it off long enough for owners to arrive and sort it before tide went any lower...

By far the easiest option would have been to motor it to safety, but that opens a can of worms and liability.. but made for an interesting discussion!

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Isn't it depressing to see how discussions on subjects like this are now heavily populated with self interest and not so much about helping others in times of need.

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I've climbed on three unmanned dragging boats to save them from damage in Whitianga, Heretonga around the back of the Barrier, and off Bodrum. I would have no hesitation in doing that again. The first we tied with a long warp to a nearby mooring, one we towed back in and re-anchored just as the owners arrived back and the third we broke into, got it started and motored around until the owners arrived back. (that one wasn't their fault, the anchor had fouled on a length of steel pipe)

Our most interesting poor anchoring incident though was in Tobago Cays when a French yacht dragged and swept an NZ Chico 30 with it onto a reef. All the Kiwis and Aussies in the anchorage came at pace. The Americans and others just watched, perhaps concerned about liability. We got the Chico 30 out from behind the French yacht with little damage.

The French guy wouldn't do what we suggested (use the big kedge we had cobbled together from several boats) to get him off so we left him till dawn. By then he had calmed down some of the Kiwi sailors got him off. To thank us he anchors about three boat lengths in front of our boat. Yep we just up anchored and moved and didn't say a word to him.

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I was in blackpool(waiheke)last sunday night,nw 20+ anchor held fine,8.00pm wind swung to sw 20+ and noticed we were dragging,fast,rather than mess about resetting picked a mooring that looked to be in good nic.stayed onboard incase owner arrived. If I had not been onboard and some kind person re anchored for me I would be most grateful

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Isn't it depressing to see how discussions on subjects like this are now heavily populated with self interest and not so much about helping others in times of need.

Self Interest?? I think that's being a bit harsh.

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I have dragged while in Issy Bay and was very grateful for the person that jumped onto Farrari and re-anchored for us.  Without their quick action Farrari would have ended up on the rocks or worse still collecting another boat on the way.  Both mine and a mate's boat dragged more or less at the same time anchored in a similar spot.  We were having a drink on another persons boat when someone said there was a person on my boat.  Both my mate and I went to find out what was happening and while we were sorting Farrari out his boat also dragged.

 

I have a habit of leaving the key in the ignition and all the thru hull taps on for exactly that reason.

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I helped one group in Coromandel over Christmas, boats dragging onto each other.  Another I motored over to and they were asleep and had not noticed, another 10 mins and they would have been slowly running aground.  We have our cell numbers on the boat if some one noticed them in the window and I quite often ask adjacent boats to keep an eye if it is windy and we are heading away for a few hours.

 

I would thank some one excessively if they jumped on my boat and stopped it hitting someone or worse.

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Too true. There are those who have dragged and those who are going too. There is no 3rd option.

 

Unrelated to the previous statement. Yeah probably Wheels.

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I really don't like where the red tape rules/laws are taking our country. I don't want us to become like the US and other countries. I have heard the stories of people not performing CPR on a person because they can be sued if they do it wrong, or something along those lines. I did say that I and I think all of us here would do something in relation to a dragging boat and stuff the Laws. And I would like to think that if something ever went wrong after and it ended in court, the Judge would use some common sense. But it is still worth considering the possibles, just in case in some situation, it needs a different judgement. Perhaps maybe the dragging boat is the Boat of that Dude that ran over and sank the Classic Sail Boat in  Auckland Harbour on Anniversary Day a few years back now. ;-)
    I have dragged three times that I can remember. One was funny as anything. Shanson and I was having a Beer. His boat was rafted to mine and I had my Anchor down holding us both in a bit of wind, but close into a beach and calm as. While we were talking, I was thinking that the wind was picking up and the water getting just a tad rough. Over a period, the water was getting slightly rougher. After half an hr I thought blimey, maybe we need to shift. I looked out the window to discover that the beach was now a mile or more away and we had drifted clean out into a Channel where it was indeed rough and windy. Ooops.
The other two times were far from funny, with one of those times being that I was not on the boat. I was just very fortunate to get back to it in time.
      Which brings me to what I think is an important point in the discussion that no one has brought up here. Anchoring and then leaving the Boat. I have never liked leaving the boat when I anchor and I take extra care in anchoring if I have too. And in saying that, yet I have still had a situation where the Boat dragged. I have seen many others anchor with very little regard to how well the anchor is holding and then up and off in the tender. It can be quite a risk and the risk should be more considered when ensuring that anchor is holding.

   

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