Jump to content

So one of these almost hit me yesterday out in the Waitemata....


Recommended Posts

Three feet.

I'm with Zozza on this one, I have seen a yacht passing an anchored tinnie at the back of Ponui, with similar clearance.

 

A gust hit at the wrong moment, the boat rounded up sharply and a collision was avoided by inches. There were several people in the tinnie, the owner was so angry he literally could not speak  (yes that angry). I mean 3 ton boat moving at 5 knots What could possibly go wrong ?

 

Its arrogance In my view, might be different in a fleet race with other competitors where it is natural competitive outcome.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm with Zozza on this one, I have seen a yacht passing an anchored tinnie at the back of Ponui, with similar clearance.

 

A gust hit at the wrong moment, the boat rounded up sharply and a collision was avoided by inches. There were several people in the tinnie, the owner was so angry he literally could not speak  (yes that angry). I mean 3 ton boat moving at 5 knots What could possibly go wrong ?

 

Its arrogance In my view, might be different in a fleet race with other competitors where it is natural competitive outcome.

In this situation, I agree entirely. There was a clear risk to personal safety, and it was the larger boat maneuvering close to the smaller boat. A bit like a truck and bicycle colliding, the larger boat isn't at risk of personal injury, but its their actions that create the risk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps I've missed this but was there any valid reason to cross this close? Was it that busy??? Were there too many boats to maintain 50m separation?

 

Without any valid reason to break the regs there I don't see the reason to stand up for breaking them

The motivation for the ~120 boats racing on the harbour that day, is that dipping to avoid someone by 50m is giving up precious time that is likely to cost you the race. Thus there's motivation to minimize the dip/amount of ground you give up.

 

As Mark said, conditions were 8-10kn and I doubt the weta was really screaming along, but it is possible it was doing more than 5kn, and thus in breach of colregs (as are the majority of boats on the waitemata at some point or other as they journey in and out of the harbour).

 

Doesn't seem like the end of the world.

Link to post
Share on other sites

All it takes is for the tri thing to round up and ruin someones day.  All you need is several near misses report to the Harbour master and it wont take much to ban sailing all together between northhead and oraki up to the harbour bridge,its been talked about before.

 

Lucky it was not me i that position as the dinghy painter would all of a sudden lengthened

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Lucky it was not me i that position as the dinghy painter would all of a sudden lengthened

 

Wow - really? You would intentionally interfere with another boat on the water like that?

Link to post
Share on other sites

How do you guys cope with the drive from home to your boat?

Just remember, in Auckland according to the council housing people, regulations are just a guide - open to negotiation and interpretation depending on your circumstances.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow - really? You would intentionally interfere with another boat on the water like that?

nothing worst than enjoying a quiet sail when you get a clown who has superior boat speed and the whole of the harbour to play on,cuts close,yep i am a prick in that situation. it can wrong quickly,what if Zozza had to take abrasive action to avoid the clown,nothing worst to ruin a family day out.

  • Downvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty rare to go for a sail in Auckland and not encounter some sort of a potential collision.

Crikey had twits exiting Westhaven in large cat wrong side of fairway.

Had Asian dude and family waving enthusiastically as they too passed down the fairway on the wrong side at speed.

Used to have a marina on V and witnessed a T bone between two twits one exiting berth and other approaching theirs.

Pet peeve right now is Steinlager carving up the harbour confines usually to weather with little courtesy to others.

Sure they have right of way but is it necessary given the volumes of traffic.

Second pet peeve is frigging stinkpot jockeys that insist on passing at speed with little separation and courtesy.

Whats with these twits.

Had trawler on auto pilot bang off North Head tramping along whilst crew had feet up enjoying cuppa something  perusing the aft view no one on watch.

The tricky part of close encounters at sea is choosing which way to turn when the other craft shows no understanding of the appropriate rules and regs.

Really no different than driving on the roads these days.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Some years ago I was beating into the inner harbor at a stately 3.5knots, slow 3/4 keeled, 25' double-ender, just off North head

 

From behind the old Americas cup boat, loaded with tourists, was rapidly approaching and was going to climb between me and north head

 

We kept a close eye on each other and he flew past at a speed and distance that gave the passengers a real taste of an an AC cross

 

 

All good

Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty rare to go for a sail in Auckland and not encounter some sort of a potential collision.

Crikey had twits exiting Westhaven in large cat wrong side of fairway.

Had Asian dude and family waving enthusiastically as they too passed down the fairway on the wrong side at speed.

Used to have a marina on V and witnessed a T bone between two twits one exiting berth and other approaching theirs.

Pet peeve right now is Steinlager carving up the harbour confines usually to weather with little courtesy to others.

Sure they have right of way but is it necessary given the volumes of traffic.

Second pet peeve is frigging stinkpot jockeys that insist on passing at speed with little separation and courtesy.

Whats with these twits.

Had trawler on auto pilot bang off North Head tramping along whilst crew had feet up enjoying cuppa something  perusing the aft view no one on watch.

The tricky part of close encounters at sea is choosing which way to turn when the other craft shows no understanding of the appropriate rules and regs.

Really no different than driving on the roads these days.

Hence why I'm saying having a light plastic dinghy thing pass close astern is fairly minor, in the scheme of things...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Am I correct in assuming that some of the people posting in this discussion have never done anything in contravention of the ColRegs?  If that is the case I would be really impressed, but somehow I don't think I will be.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Most copies of the colregs end with the advice to the give-way vessel to give way in plenty of time and by one substantial course alteration instead of a number of small increments. The purpose of this is to let the stand-on vessel know that the give-way vessel knows and understands her obligations under the colregs.

So why would you want to do otherwise? Passing within a gnats whisker of each other only serves to sow doubts in the stand-on skippers mind that the idiot barreling towards him doesn't understand the colregs, and may cause him therefore to initiate an avoiding manoeuvre that could have unintended consequences for both vessels.

The old adage of do unto others as you would like them to do to you comes to mind.

If we were to apply the colregs with a degree of courtesy instead of a sense of entitlement then all would be well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Am I correct in assuming that some of the people posting in this discussion have never done anything in contravention of the ColRegs?  If that is the case I would be really impressed, but somehow I don't think I will be.

 

Au contraire, the rules are simple to learn and simple to observe and implement.

Patently obvious that many who take to the water are ignorant twits with little knowledge of the regs.

Cannot recall any naughty manoeuvres excessive speed nor discourteous behaviour originating from our old log of wood.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Have the kids actually been told of the ColRegs?

 

My first introduction to sailing was Port gives way to Starboard, Windward gives way to Leeward, Power gives way to sail

 

I didn't encounter the term "ColRegs" until I moved to New Zealand in 2013, before that my keel boat sailing was done on the foredeck so didn't really need to know then as the back of the boat didn't listen to me anyway.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

If this thread was my visit to crew.org I would not come back.

Haha! That just about sums up most of the threads here these days. To an outsider it must look like the ‘Wild West’ of boating with zero regard for etiquette, rules & regulations or self-discipline!

Link to post
Share on other sites

If this thread was my visit to crew.org I would not come back.

It was my first thread on crew.org, and appears to be no different to similar threads that can be read on gliding or motorcycling fora.  :razz:

  • Upvote 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I always find it interesting when a person complains about the actions of others, yet may themselves be undertaking activities that are not compliant with rules or requirements. Sometimes it is a matter of perspective as one persons close is another person miles away. When at sea on a voyage I had a standing order of a 2' mile cpa to any vessel, yet some vessels seemed comfortable with about a cable or two in the open ocean.

 

My favourite example of peoplles perspective was a person who called to complain about the behaviour of a commercial boat which had passed him a few meters at away, at speed and at night. Sounded very concerning until I ilicited from him that he was laying a set net in the shipping channel, at night, with no lights on his boat, and he was faced over the back of his boat feeding the net out at the time and not keeping a lookout. He was adamant the commercial vessel was at fault.

 

He hung up on me when I asked if he wanted to provided his name, address, and details so I could take the strong enforcement action he was demanding to be applied to the guilty party.

 

Hopefully he had a think about it. Interestingly the commercial vessel had already reported a near miss with an unlit vessel in the channel at night.

  • Upvote 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...