Jump to content

Legasea supports Rahui


Recommended Posts

Would you support this action?? and I do but its not just scallops that should be saved.There no is inshore beds of shellfish,pipi/cockle etc should be total ban Nationally as this just puts more pressure on other areas. Will Minister Parker bow down and support??

The MPI latest questionaire regarding stock is a call to ban recc dredges but not commercial.I say make commercial use air like their counter parts in Australia with their Ablone.

 

Ngāti Manuhiri placed a rāhui on all scallop harvesting across their rohe moana due to a decline in scallop populations.
The closure area spans from Mangawhai Heads down to Takapuna, encompassing Great Barrier and Little Barrier Islands, and applies to commercial, recreational and customary fishing.
A dawn ceremony to lay a rāhui tapū was held yesterday at Tāwharanui regional park, with our LegaSea crew attending the ceremony.
The rāhui is supported by local communities and organisations, and the Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust have submitted an application to the Minister Parker for a two-year closure on all scallop harvesting.
We ask all fishers to please support the rāhui, to help restore Hauraki Gulf scallop populations.
Fulsome support for the closure has already been announced by NZ Diving, Wettie NZ, local clubs including the Warkworth Gamefish Club, Mangawhai Boating & Fishing Club and Omaha Beach Community Inc, the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron and New Zealand Underwater Association.
Recent applications from Ngāti Hei, Ngāti Tamatera and Ngāti Paoa to close scallop fisheries in their areas have been approved by Minister Parker, and with Ngāti Manuhiri also joining the action, it is clear scallop populations need time to rebuild and the fishery needs to shut.
Fisheries New Zealand is currently consulting on proposals to close the entire Hauraki Gulf to Bay of Plenty scallop fishery from April this year. The New Zealand Sport Fishing Council, New Zealand Angling & Casting Association and the New Zealand Underwater Association have submitted in support of the Minister closing both the Northland and Hauraki Gulf – Bay of Plenty (Coromandel) scallop fisheries on the northeast coast to all harvesting for a minimum of three years.
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, harrytom said:

Would you support this action??

Yes, with the provision that there is significant effort put into understanding why stocks are depleting, and that any quota used after the rahui/ban is lifted is monitored and adjusted seasonally with the commercial users paying all costs of monitoring.

Quota was once thought of as an environmentally sound management system that would allow increases and decreases in catch depending on the current state of the fishery.  Now it appears more like a licence to plunder until the fishery is so decimated its not economical to fish. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

quota is an on going issue for all stock,but I believe the top of the South island has been closed for over 5yrs and no sign of improvment. We should be looking further afield,Whats running from the land to the sea from subdivision works??silt smothers the stock and move off,heavy metals,coromandel way with all the loging works washing in to the sea,storm water. They have seeded mussels in to Okahu bay to filter the water but my way of thinking the will unedible due toxins they filter.

Top of the south interesting read from a ex comms.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/123730152/scallop-recovery-in-top-of-the-south-still-clouded-by-uncertainty

 

Not sure if a fishing licence like fresh water fishing will help,somehow many believe its their birthright to extract seafood,yet to see this in the statuary books. Sure everything is in commercial favour,so we are told but I am convinced if advocacy groups worked in with the fisherman, not the companies we might get a better outcome.

No skipper sets to sea to dump stock but the system forces it and owners,example is. owner I want 5 tonne snapper,hell price dropped I dont need it now.What does the fisherman do land at a loss or discretly dumps it,I tore my net and reports it as such no problem then,but big fine if caught llleagally dumping it.

Its a balancing act.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, waikiore said:

When the rec size limit for snapper is the same as the commercial size limit people will give the regulations some respect

Commercial east coast us 27cm and west coast 25cm 

Reccs east coast 30 cm west 27cm 

Gurnard comms no size limit.

Reccs 25cm

Fair??

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I support a total ban on scallops until their numbers are back up. Something has to be done.

I like the idea of research into why they have decreased so much. I would love it if this research investigated the efficacy of a total ban on dredging too. 

I've said for a long time that we need scallops to be freedive only, like paua. Then the deep scallops seed the shallower ones and the beds can't get decimated like they do now. I know this is unlikely to happen unfortunately.

If anyone (commercial or customary) can take a particular seafood, then every nz resident had a right to take home a feed of it as far as I'm concerned. Size limits need to be the same for all.

  • Upvote 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, bazzathemammoth said:

I support a total ban on scallops until their numbers are back up. Something has to be done.

I like the idea of research into why they have decreased so much. I would love it if this research investigated the efficacy of a total ban on dredging too. 

I've said for a long time that we need scallops to be freedive only, like paua. Then the deep scallops seed the shallower ones and the beds can't get decimated like they do now. I know this is unlikely to happen unfortunately.

If anyone (commercial or customary) can take a particular seafood, then every nz resident had a right to take home a feed of it as far as I'm concerned. Size limits need to be the same for all.

Have a read about the top of the South Island,5yrs on and still not recovering,no one wants to look at the enviroment,why??too hard basket.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/123730152/scallop-recovery-in-top-of-the-south-still-clouded-by-uncertainty

Link to post
Share on other sites

If the fishing industry has to fall over to restore the fishery over all species, so be it. It has been greedily exploited right back to the whaling/sealing days.

Just come back from 5 day barrier trip. The gulf was a desert.  Always an awesome experience, except for the pervading gloom of missing sealife. Missed the swell by a day , but went anyway.

Skirted all the breaks at 3m contour, at speed. Least that was fun!

Only boat we saw out East was a  genesis (?) with a lone fisher, fishing all day. Holed up in Haro at night.

Just wtf was he up to? 

Definitely a pastime I can no longer embrace.

https://we.tl/t-oJKvHXXH6i

 

285Mb

Onboard with any ban, & research into cause. Not on board for waiting for results of research.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Guest said:

. The gulf was a desert. 

If its a desert, how do five guys catch 350 snapper in a day?

Not that I disagree with your basic position, but it seems we are in short supply of hard data and unbiased analysis while the anecdotal evidence swings wildly between tales of a scorched earth situation and tales of crazy-excessive catches.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Isnt the govts first responsibility to manage the fishery, it is a traditional free food resource after all which makes it a little different to oil or mineral extraction rights.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In France you are not allowed to gather seafood with scuba, snorkel only.  If we had that rule here there would be a lot more crays and scallops about.

 

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, aardvarkash10 said:

If its a desert, how do five guys catch 350 snapper in a day?

Not that I disagree with your basic position, but it seems we are in short supply of hard data and unbiased analysis while the anecdotal evidence swings wildly between tales of a scorched earth situation and tales of crazy-excessive catches.

Metaphorically, obviously. With electronic aids, a bit of experience and lots of fuel anyone can still harvest over limit. Even without (bar fuel); just rape & pillage fishing mentality. My observation is unobjective, based on frequency of  encounters with workups, dolphins, Orca, Kahawai, Brydes, etc from early 70's. The visual spectacle inshore is just not what it used to be. The cray "supermarkets" are gone or way harder to find. But you can still get cray. I agree with your multifaceted research approach, as harvest vs biomass levels  are obviously not the only variables at play for a holistic recovery. Pollution, land erosion/devlpmt sediment, man made noise, acidification,  water temps change etc impede settlement from nurseries areas, hence recovery is slow. Reserves are insufficient in quantity and haphazardly placed to provide a steady supply of larvae to restock downstream suitable habitat. Past habitat rendered uninhabitable. The fishery needs to be managed, not taken for granted with token gestures and subservience to certain supposed interests. What has eventuated is a disgrace. Our country/govt has been inept, relying on one dimensional thinking, rather than whole ocean ecosystem and a pandering to both commercial and recreational interests. (IMO)

A family member has spent past five years researching the effects of man made noise on susceptible fisheries for NOAA & WHOI. She is currently establishing a NZ underwater soundscape metric. Somewhat more definitive than my “desert“ observation. The noise (communicative) fish emit can give us valuable data on species, numbers, maturity, behaviour etc. We need to understand more, but the need for immediate "hands off" the gulf is far from rocket science. The ability to repopulate is dwindling by the day.

She discovered that megalopae larvae responded to certain acoustic cues that could be recreated in the lab and would descend the water column to the cue and settle. (And metamorphosis) The acoustic cue associated with suitable habitat. Certain reef noise etc. Evolution for you. OK stuff if the habitat has been cleaned up or just needs repopulating. If its a polluted wasteland?

The cues, of course, are multi; acoustic, chemical, magnetic etc. Sound plays a major role for a successful life cycle for some species.

Uh-oh... drift.

https://academic.oup.com/beheco/article/21/1/113/180727?login=false

  • Upvote 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just received this via email

 

Hello fellow Hauraki Gulf Fans,

This is just a brief heads-up about an upcoming meeting you may be interested in attending. On Tuesday 24th May, Simon Watts, National MP for North Shore, is hosting a public meeting about the Hauraki Gulf. At this meeting you will hear from the following speakers:

Alex Rogers – the Executive Officer of the Hauraki Gulf Forum. Alex is the author of the report presented to the Hauraki Gulf Forum on 28 February, setting out a recommended advocacy position for updating and strengthening the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Act 2000. This included the recommendation to establish a Treaty partnership model with equal membership between iwi representatives and representatives of central/local government.

Dr Andrew Jeffs – Professor in Marine Science at the University of Auckland, whose research interests include aquaculture, restoring mussel populations, lobster biology, and the biological role of underwater sound. 

Moana Tamaariki-Pohe, MNZM – former Deputy Chairperson of the Hauraki Gulf Forum, now representing Te Puni Kōkiri – the Ministry for Māori Development.

Dr Peter Longdill – Sanford’s sustainability manager. Sanford is one of the largest commercial fishers in the Hauraki Gulf.

Sam Woolford – spokesperson of LegaSea, an organisation “dedicated to restoring the abundance, biodiversity and health of New Zealand's marine environment”. LegaSea supports the establishment of co-governance structures in the Hauraki Gulf.

More details of the event, Revitalising the Hauraki Gulf, can be found here.

WHEN
Tuesday May 24, 2022 at 7:00pm - 8:30pm

WHERE
Wakatere Boating Club
Narrow Neck Beach
Devonport
Auckland 0624
Google map and directions

You can RVSP the organisers by clicking HERE. For more information contact Azita Nafissi azita.nafissi@parliament.govt.nz.

Cheers,
Lee Short
Spokesperson 
Gulf Users Group

 
f53440ca-b2b3-b85d-19de-77a12061e3ab.jpe
 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes and who was the National fisheries Minister that kept peeing in comms pockets and accepting bribes and who is the National party president and owner of "Sandfords"?

Nathan Guy was the minsiter and Peter Goodfellow president,leopard change its spots?nah

  • Upvote 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

That & owner or major shareholder of a Co harvesting a resource can hold a  political party management position  boggles the mind! 
This is contrary to the interest of the average nz’er,  imo. I will stop there.

New Zeamericana

 

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...