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This Weekend's Achievements


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Received negative PCR test.

Drove 1240km in 12h15

Washed squab covers, pillows and duvets

Water blasted 10 months of algae off deck

Broomed rudders back to orange

Experienced 3 gales in 4 days

Didn't lift boat for wash as marina crew quite leery about lifting in that kinda weather

Got in 3.5h of sailing

Installed inverter

Installed 12v DC/DC converter to charge 80Ah LiFePO4 for dinghy

Installed gas detector (finally)

Toured Pogo factory (again)

Spent €300 on wine

Drove 1240km

Didn't scratch boat.

 

 

 

 

 

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Almost got the brand spanking new trailer finished. It's been a long road, trying to use the old parts, and failing miserably.

Just a couple more nylocks to go, then the boat gets mobile again.

Would put pics up, but didn't think about it and suddenly it was night.

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Solo Delivery Waikawa - Lyttelton - Ross 30 Ballistic

Got up 3.00am Friday morning and drove to Picton from Christchurch , arriving at 8.30am, quick stop at Picton supermarket for delivery trip food.  Caught Cougar water taxi service from Picton to Resolution Bay, Queen Charlotte where boat was moored. Grabbed some tote tanks etc and dinghy. Inflated dinghy and loaded dinghy to get out to mooring. 15 metres offshore and flipped said dinghy....gurgle ... and who was the idiot who didn't close their 110 litre gear bag properly....  now a 2hp motor drowned... wet gear, wet sleeping bag and a wet, somewhat unhappy but still smiling idiot. (never ever flipped dinghy before!)

Drained dinghy, retrieved and sorted gear and reloaded dinghy to get to boat. Loaded gear on boat, warmed up boat , idiot changed clothes into the driest clothes available...fortunately idiot had put all his wet weather gear, woolly hat, gloves etc. in a separate sealed dry bag.  Motored back to Waikawa to fuel up - fueled up and put 20 litres water onboard.  Turned around and motored back down to Diffenbach and Tory channel.

Exited Tory channel at 6.00pm Friday night in a light, land affected northerly with an ebbing tide but later than the planned Tory entrance HW at 3.00pm due to the previous dinghy issue.  Slow trip across Cloudy Bay motor-sailing in a varying N-NW. Milky way was incredible...  Set up a waypoint for a comfortable separation distance from Sheperdess Reef off Cape Campbell ( 155-165S mag) which was approached around 11.00pm Here the the sea - state and wind picked up. Hand steered for a while with a conservative double reefed main only...with an ocassional surf in the irregular waves. Eventually made enough southing to be back in deeper clear water with better waves and a more stable ride. Shook out one reef to enable the boat to better accelerate when on a wave and fine tuned the response rate on the pilot where I could happily leave the boat to steer itself.

Made a Milo, had a snack and enjoyed the ride. The breeze built nicely between 20 - 25TWS broad reaching. I checked the AIS and had a good look around and headed below for a quick kip.  Inshore and South of Cape Campbell but still north of Ward. Plenty of Hectors darting about like small grey torpedoes.

A 930 broad reaching in waves in 20-25 knots going relatively slowly is not the most stable platform and any rest/sleep was fitful but the boat started to cover some good ground until about 3.30am when the breeze started to drop as forecast. Being solo on my first delivery South I wasn't keen on chasing the considerable forecast 25knot + N breeze offshore.

As dawn cast its orange glow the wind was light and we were motoring again.  Arriving off Clarence, katabatic winds teased that we might be able to stop the motor and sail but they were fleeting. As forecast from Waipapa to Kaikoura next to no breeze in a sloppy, left over Northerly wave state.

Our planned route had the boat pass passed just to seaward of the Kaikoura Peninsula where there were many long weekend fishers and cray pots to be negotiated. Made slow progress all afternoon till abeam Haumuri Bluffs where the approaching ridge was generating warm NW puffs off the shore. Up went the jib top but the breeze was unstable varying from on hard on the nose to aft of the beam.  Just out to sea I saw a whale blow but hadn't seen anything within 500metres of the boat. Still plenty of Hectors zooming about including a mum with a small calf who came and rode the bow wave for a bit. 

Off Gore Bay the breeze finally came back at 15knots from the North which was welcomed and the 25m deep water meant the swells where starting to setup with the boat speed increasing nicely.  As dusk approached, I tidied up the boat and cooked up a meal. The breeze was building.  After dinner I sat and observed how the pilot was driving and further fine tuned the settings so that the boat stayed on course with minimal steering input from the pilot.  As darkness  enveloped the boat I decided I wanted to go back to a second reef.  A quick round up off course to the west to unload the main slides, dump the mainsheet, flip the halyard, secure the tack strop at the mast, back to the cockpit, halyard up to the mark, wind in the 2# reefline and a quick tack to resume course at 191S Mag. Only 60nm to run to the second Starboard channel marker at Lyttelton.  The breeze was now at a steady 18-24knots with a building sea state.  Idiot was getting tired...

Now able to see the glow of the Christchurch lights against low cloud which seemed to take forever to get larger. The boat was constantly accelerating and decelerating between 6 and 12 knots on some of the waves. The wind was directly aft and at times by the lee. Pegasus Bay is a big shallow bay and in the forecast 25kn Northerly breeze the waves started to crest behind the boat with a roar. The boat would then accelerate with a woosh before falling off the back and the process would begin again.

AIS picked up an approaching 235m long container ship on a converging course doing 14.5 knots. I thought I could see the lights to the east but the low cloud was making everything gloomy. I watched as the AIS target quickly closed, passed and then set up for anchor in the Anchorage off Godley Head outside Lyttelton.  

Fatigue had set in as the breeze died again about 5miles from the channel marker waypoint... I was starting to have real difficulty gauging distance despite what the plotter was telling me.  I passed the outermost anchored ship close to starboard and finally I could see the 5 second green flash of the Starboard channel markers. Almost there. Really tired.

I turned to head up the main harbour channel but hadn't really been up the channel at night since the Lyttelton Port Company had completed its sizeable reclamation and installed its considerable new navigation aids. The place was lit lit up like a Xmas tree. My depth perception was now completely shot... I was starting to see things, like large barges being pushed by tugs that weren't there! 

Finally made the turn into the inner basin between the moles past the new unoccupied cruise ship berth and lowered and secured the main...made it!   Despite the fatigue I felt a great sense of satisfaction despite the timing late season. I motored around towards the visitor berth at Te Ana but it was occupied by a 40 something Lagoon. So turned around and headed out and around to the Naval Point Floater... I needed sleep. 

I berthed alongside the floater, made sure everything was secure and collapsed into my bunk under my wet sleeping bag. Four hours later I was up and organising for my wife to come collect some gear and then meet me at Purau Bay, near Diamond Harbour where the boat was going to be moored on a mate's mooring. 

Got the boat on the mooring and launched the dinghy and rowed ashore. Got home and sorted all the wet gear out, pulled the 2hp motor to bits... had a shower and crashed into bed Saturday afternoon at 2.00pm.  Checked in with my mooring owner mate after 6.00pm that night who said he was travelling to Picton next day (Monday for work).

Sunday Justin turned up at 1.00pm and we drove to Picton arriving at my car at 6.00ish. Fueled car and left Picton for Christchurch at 6.35pm and was home at 10.45pm. It was a big weekend.

Footnote - I spent weeks watching the weather waiting for a decent weather window to do this delivery where I wouldn't be thumped by a Southerly in the final stages crossing Pegasus Bay.  The weather forecast was 20knot Northerly in Cook Strait with a 25-30knot Northerly pulse in the Campbell area/Southern Castlepoint area before settling into a 25knot northerly offshore in Conway building to a 25-30knot Northerly gusting 35knots in Pegasus on Saturday afternoon evening. My inshore route meant I missed most of the breeze offshore but did see 25knots TWs for sustained period.

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^nice write-up!  Good to get all the big mistakes made in the first fifteen minutes or so eh...

Love Parau Bay.  Excellent hill for racing down on a skateboard!

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18 minutes ago, splat said:

182NM down the rhumb line I think

Hi Splat, I am very curious to know, how did you flip the dinghy?

I don't want to sound rude or anything, but I've never experienced it, and would like not to if I can understand the causes.

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An older southern pacific donut style boat with a centre seat/thwart.  Had a couple empty 23litre tote tanks in the front with my gear bag on top. 2 hp Yammie on the back jumped in and sat on the seat facing towards motor but my bag was pushing me back towards the motor so no clearance to pull start... so I moved sideways to pontoon ( facepalm)... and flipped it over backwards...as I said idiot....don't be an idiot. After almost 45 years mucking about in boats you would think I would have learnt!

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Relatively minor sugery.

Poor fitting of the spray dodger frame some 15 odd years ago led to a small soft patch in the cabin top.

After thinking it through a bit, I decided a hole saw was the appropriate response.  4 layers of 6mm ply fills the holes, all now epoxied into place.  Yes, the segments were alternated for seal and strength.  The dry images are of the dry fit - once fit test was done, they were coated both sides with epoxy as the went in. 

Each ply insert is 64mm diameter, so not a big area.

Tomorrow is boatcloth and more epoxy on both sides, paint next weekend, if its fine enough.

IMG_20210612_132326.jpg

IMG_20210612_121320.jpg

IMG_20210612_115748_1.jpg

IMG_20210612_114714_1.jpg

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20210620_0248.thumb.jpg.60b3ad67f88d6b5caf7e01d580137055.jpg

11.30 Saturday ready to launch

Thought this was worth a mention, a few weeks ago I broke the shaft strut on Psyche or rather it was more likely the result of 40 years of electric sea mice nibbling away. It was discovered hanging down off the shaft during routine clean, possibly been like that for a few weeks! I had planned to replace it with a bronze strut, the process involved getting a pattern, casting and machining which all takes time, and to coincide that with the yard plus the need to be out of the water for the shortest time meant that a lot of moving parts had to come together to make it all work.

A space came up and I hauled on Tuesday with the plan to get back in by Friday for day 3 of the winter series. I hoped to get the strut by Thursday from the foundry which was still cutting it fine but a call from the supplier pushed that back to maybe status and more likely the following week. A bit of hunting around turned up one on the shelf of another supplier for over a $1000 which I baulked at but it also needed machining i.e. Time I did not have, so like any good cheap yachtie in a hurry I decided to build one instead.

Had quick chat with a composite guy who advised making it the same size as the existing one. I made up a pattern on the bench with some battens and filled it with alternating layers of unis and DB, got a phenolic bearing, hot glued it to the fin and long story short laminated the sticky mess, shaped it then put it in the boat Friday lunchtime. This particular style of strut slides up through the hull and usually gets two pins put through, but with a composite one there's no need for the pins. When it was lined up it had to held while the glue went off and once it was solid, I reinforced it inside the boat with multiple layers of DB up the sides. Now it was getting dark but with help from a couple of friends and a lot of swearing about uncaged needle rollers, we got the rudder back in.

At this point I was cold, tired and the forecast for Saturday was somewhere between abysmal and apocalyptic with rain and 40 knots from the north, but there was a glimmer of hope that maybe it might pass by early. The other factor was that the tide was at 14:10 and getting off in time for the start at 13:10 was marginal. But there was a chance so what the hell, usually I get it sprayed but due to time constraints and the yards conditions it was roller time.  I put on the headlight and proceeded to paint antifoul on until midnight! Apart from being a bit unorthodox the headlight method has a lot going for it, you can see every roller mark and deal with it!

Fortunately, one of the crew turned up and proceeded to tell stories and drink beer watching me work (no painting clothes apparently) and then had the very excellent idea at 10 pm to start rounding the rest of the team for Saturday. "Hi are you good to race tomorrow- yes ok well never mind the weather and see you at the boat yard because um er it’s not really floating at the moment" haha! Talk about commitment, we went from skeleton status to full but apparently some had to go rum drinking until 1 a.m. to press gang reluctant members who had made other plans. 

The front went through early and unbelievably it dawned a beautiful sunny day, everyone was there before 12 with the boat on the rails ready to go and after a bit of instruction from the yard captain on safety everyone pitched in to get her rolling into the tide at 12:15- then the three of us on board waited while the rest of the crew watched from shore. To float we needed minimum weight. At the minutes ticked by 12:30, 12.35... nothing but a bit of bobbing around, then at 12:45 with a well timed ferry wash, full reverse and two pushing on the cradle we were free at last! 

One of the club guys kindly rowed the crew out in 2 loads then we were off and on time. No one expected us to be on the start line to defend our position in the series so it was even better that we ended up with a great result and consolidated our lead thanks to a great crew.

Quite an achievement for the weekend, could not have done it without a lot of help (you know who you are :)), btw I'm the new owner of the site and if that Editor guy gives you any grief let me know. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Black Panther said:

Anchor up Bon Accord 0710, anchor down tutukaka 1430. Not bad for a singlehander in a 25 y o plywood box .

Av. ~7kts?

BP’s form is less ‘box’ and more ‘pencil’

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About that. I left with a reef in main and foresail so was underpowered till about 10 miles from Sail Rock, that was fine as I got to have breakfast and tidy up. Then it freshened throughout the day, probably averaged 8.5 to 9 for the second half of the trip. Saw 11 a couple of times near tutukaka. Certainly shook the cobwebs out and made the 3 day wait at Kawau worth it.

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17 minutes ago, Black Panther said:

About that. I left with a reef in main and foresail so was underpowered till about 10 miles from Sail Rock, that was fine as I got to have breakfast and tidy up. Then it freshened throughout the day, probably averaged 8.5 to 9 for the second half of the trip. Saw 11 a couple of times near tutukaka. Certainly shook the cobwebs out and made the 3 day wait at Kawau worth it.

What wind?? down in the firth we had channel 20 bleating 20/25 knt collville meanwhile middle of firth (mania harbour side) zilch.

 

f3.jpg

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15 minutes ago, harrytom said:

What wind?? down in the firth we had channel 20 bleating 20/25 knt collville meanwhile middle of firth (mania harbour side) zilch.

 

f3.jpg

Started with 15, ended with 25

Three days at Kawau weren't wasted either, enough fishies for 5 meals. Started with fish tacos

IMG-20210619-WA0006.jpg

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10 minutes ago, Black Panther said:

Started with 15, ended with 25

Three days at Kawau weren't wasted either, enough fishies for 5 meals. Started with fish tacos

IMG-20210619-WA0006.jpg

water temp 16.2 fish tacos yummy

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On 22/06/2021 at 3:32 PM, L00seM00se said:

Got my first ever line honours and win on handicap...(there were only two boats)...(it was the cruising division)...

It is a given that if 2 yachts occupy the same body of water, at least one of them is racing

Doesn't matter if the other knows, or is going the same way, or is even a yacht or even a boat. I raced my wife (in car) back from Sandspit to Westhaven one day, yacht won (long weekend traffic)

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