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My boats got a 120v supply and distribution set up and has never been connected to NZ shore supply.

 

I want to get it connected to shore power so need a WOF

 

Whats involved in cost?,is it a major?

 

The 4 x power points have been been changed to NZ 3 pin but thats all that has been changed from factory new.

 

The electric water heater is still 110v element and the mains distribution board is original with 110v main switch/ breaker and 110v powerpoint and water heater breakers.

 

Anybody able to shed some light on this?.

 

Cheers.

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You will have to upgrade the heating to 230V of course. The switchboard should handle 230V OK, even though it is 110V. Wiring will be OK as long as the inspector is happy with perhaps a different colour coding. Earth bonding will be the main crucial test. And you will have to ensure the power into the boat has the correct recepticle and an RCD.

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I just plugged the 110v water heater straight into 240. Never had a problem.

 

and the reason why marinas and others are asking for more and more certificates and compliance costs are increasing.

 

Morspeed - presuming it is a glass boat you have. Whatever make sure the earthing is local and only to your appliances, for example not to the hull and rigging.

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Could you use an inverter so the mains is converted to what the boat is wired for?

No point as the appliances (i assume) would be 230V and getting an inverter for just the hot water would not be worthwhile.

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You will have to upgrade the heating to 230V of course. The switchboard should handle 230V OK, even though it is 110V. Wiring will be OK as long as the inspector is happy with perhaps a different colour coding. Earth bonding will be the main crucial test. And you will have to ensure the power into the boat has the correct recepticle and an RCD.

 

 

Thanks Wheels,I was planning on changing the water element if it is easily available off the shelf, if not i will just disconnect the water heater from main board as its heated via engine anyway and I don't need dockside hot water.

 

Does the rcd need to be at point of entry on boat or do you mean at shore power dock socket?.

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I just plugged the 110v water heater straight into 240. Never had a problem.

 

Actually its impressive you haven't had any smoke escape from the wires, I've heard its a bastard to put back in.

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Could you use an inverter so the mains is converted to what the boat is wired for?

No point as the appliances (i assume) would be 230V and getting an inverter for just the hot water would not be worthwhile.

For the cost of freight from the states for the old appliance versus a complete rewiring at $$$$

 

At what point does an inverter make financial sense?

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I just plugged the 110v water heater straight into 240. Never had a problem.

 

and the reason why marinas and others are asking for more and more certificates and compliance costs are increasing.

 

Morspeed - presuming it is a glass boat you have. Whatever make sure the earthing is local and only to your appliances, for example not to the hull and rigging.

 

Thanks Otto, Yep, glass, will look into how its bonded, its all factory install now and actually pretty tidy and quality cabling throughout, just not sure if the yanks build/wire to NZ standards.

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Could you use an inverter so the mains is converted to what the boat is wired for?

No point as the appliances (i assume) would be 230V and getting an inverter for just the hot water would not be worthwhile.

 

Yep only hot water to deal with and besides 110v/230v inverters are damn expensive... and still have to get the WOF to hook into shorepower.

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I guess the first question needs to be, what 230V appliances do you want to run. It may be easier to have 12V appliances. Or it may be easier to keep the 110V appliances and have a 110V inverter. You don't need a 110V to 230V inverter. Just a 12V to 110V. Going this way, you only need a 230V to 12V charger and the inverter runs all 110V appliances. If you want to go to 230V, you can also go the path of a 230V inverter and a 230V to 12V charger and run all appliances from the inverter being powered from the battery bank. Going this way, you technically are not connected to mains shore power and thus technically don't need an EWOF. But the Charger has to be "seen" by inspector and by Marina's as a temporary connected system. Not hard connected to the vessel in other words.

The big issue these days is finding someone that actually understands the new standards and how to either get around them, as in how I have described, or wire to them without going overboard.

So...., my system is all "in house". I don't ever need to connect to shorepower. I have 12V house bank supplying a 2.5Kw 230V inverter/charger. Solar panels and wind gen charge the 12V banks. A genset supplies 230V to the system when we need to power Microwave and the charger automatically switches on and pumps 130A into the banks while at the same time providing the power to Microwave. Turn of the genset and the charger auto switches back to become inverter again and that runs TV and a few other appliances.

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Zen, you need to get your heater looked at. You are running the danger of causing a fire. I cannot understand how you could get away with using the 110V element on 230V as the current will be well above the normal operating current and I can only but think that you are dissipating the extra current into the wires somewhere. It really doesn't makes sense. Something else must be getting hot somewhere.

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Zen, you need to get your heater looked at. You are running the danger of causing a fire. I cannot understand how you could get away with using the 110V element on 230V as the current will be well above the normal operating current and I can only but think that you are dissipating the extra current into the wires somewhere. It really doesn't makes sense. Something else must be getting hot somewhere.

 

Correct and a concern, let's say its a 1500W element rated at 110V.

Connecting it to 230V will now have an ouput of around 6000W plus.

That is depending on the volt-drop and connections. If there is a noticable volt-drop and the connections are not as good then the output will be less, but then as wheels has said the cables and terminations will now be starting to heat.

Then depending on the protection if this is left on the heat will slowly increase and is likely to cause a fire without tripping the supply.

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Have since looked up the loads for these heaters.

Normally the elements are around 750W so connecting a 110V to 230V will increase the output to around 3000W.

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Hi

Am semi qualified to answer this one being an Elect Eng, and having owned a boat from the USA myself.

 

1) Wiring wise its prob ok to use the USA wire ,as the size of the copper wire is much bigger when running 110V ofr sockets. So Wiring to sockets might be 2.5mm or 4mm. Using it on 230v means it will likely be oversize (double the voltage halves the current). ITs almost certainly rated for use upto around 600V depending on the cable type, so there should be no problems there.

 

2) Water heater, I would replace if you can, as it wasnt likely designed to run @ 230v. And might leak to earth causing RCD tripping issues.

 

3) IF there are a lot of 230v appliances on board a Cheap (ish) option is to put a 110/230V transformer onboard. I did this to power 110V Fridge/TV/Microwave etc. But eventually ditched it as I replaced most of the 110V Appliances with 230v ones from NZ.

 

4) You might want to fit a 230v rated RCD at the main switchboard, and check the ratings of the AC circuit breakers.

 

Hope that helps.

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Tried to answer this earlier but I must have hit the wrong button :crazy:

As Redline has well pointed out the boat wiring should be fine - if it's to be connected to mains power It will need an RCD fitted at point of supply - I would also recommend a galvanic Isolator - an inspector will want to see this when he issues the WOF, it will also save you a whole heap of other issues on the boat. Its my understand if a Reg Electrician does the work he can issue the first Wof for the boat -I would check this as the regs seem to be changing every week in NZ at the mo.

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Hi

Am semi qualified to answer this one being an Elect Eng, and having owned a boat from the USA myself.

 

1) Wiring wise its prob ok to use the USA wire ,as the size of the copper wire is much bigger when running 110V ofr sockets. So Wiring to sockets might be 2.5mm or 4mm. Using it on 230v means it will likely be oversize (double the voltage halves the current). ITs almost certainly rated for use upto around 600V depending on the cable type, so there should be no problems there.

 

2) Water heater, I would replace if you can, as it wasnt likely designed to run @ 230v. And might leak to earth causing RCD tripping issues.

 

3) IF there are a lot of 230v appliances on board a Cheap (ish) option is to put a 110/230V transformer onboard. I did this to power 110V Fridge/TV/Microwave etc. But eventually ditched it as I replaced most of the 110V Appliances with 230v ones from NZ.

 

4) You might want to fit a 230v rated RCD at the main switchboard, and check the ratings of the AC circuit breakers.

 

Hope that helps.

 

That does help Redline, thanks.

 

pulled all switchboard panel off yesterday and tracked all wiring..yes she's heavy duty stuff..main into switchboard from male plug at transom is 10 gauge.

 

Waterheater is a seaward model S600 with 1500w element, really i would like to put a 230v element in it maybe 750W ?.

 

There are no appliances fixed or otherwise onboard except for the 230vac/12vdc fridge I installed a year ago.

 

The main switch is a 30 amp double pole ( L&N) circuit breaker...you still recommend replace this with a RCD or just put one inline with circuit breaker?.

 

Switch board circuit breakers are all 15 amp for the sockets and 15 amp for the water heater,

 

Thanks Spinner ..

 

There is already a galvanic isolator behind switchboard, Earth from transom supply socket connects direct to this galv iso and then another terminal on the galv iso has an earth wire connected to earth busbar....this adequate you reckon?.

 

Boats at Half moon bay..any one recommend a sparky to inspect and issue wof with out stitching me up?.

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