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mcp

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  1. Upvote
    mcp got a reaction from tuffyluffy in Volvo Penta oil filter cross reference to Ryco   
    Z158 from ryco.  That engine is a Perkins 103-10, Perkins m30, Shibaura 753, ford 1220 tractor, new holland 1440 tractor, caterpillar 3001, it's found in hustler lawn mowers, bobcats, northern lights generators, refrigerated shipping containers.  Very very common engine.

  2. Upvote
    mcp got a reaction from Island Time in Best AGM battery   
    What type of boat are you building?
     
    Money no object,  no question, Lithium titanate for any purpose.   Otherwise for a cruiser/liveaboard Lithium Iron Phosphate or Lead carbon from a reputable manufacturer,  and why I don't say one or the other,  is because it depends on how you will use it.  If you cruise only 3 - 4 weeks a year I would say a quality AGM,  as it will take you a bloody long time to use 400-500 cycles if you system is set up correctly.   If you are a racer and want super light, your boat can be setup as light as your chequebook wants it to be.
  3. Upvote
    mcp got a reaction from tuffyluffy in Mildew on unpainted surfaces   
    I second this recommendation and you will find this in the cheapest of Pak'n'Save disinfectants as the active ingredient.  I spray my boat, path, deck, roof, etc with it and it works perfectly from a pressure spray mixed 50/50.  Takes a week or so to work.....much longer in summer.
    https://www.paknsaveonline.co.nz/product/5231715_ea_000pns?name=lavender-disinfectant
  4. Like
    mcp got a reaction from 2flit in Lithium v AGM   
    Anyone that has charges this type of chemistry through a shunt with a coulomb counter can verify these are about 99% or more efficient. 
     
    This post was not intended to be a tutorial or a how to in any way.   While these batteries are far far more forgiving than most people say,  these are not drop in replacements and require a certain level of knowledge to set up and manage.   These are not set and forget and certainly not she'll be right, I know what im doing setup.      I saying all that,  I'm not sure how you would loose your boat if these failed,  you would certainly loose your pride and a large handful of cash. 
  5. Upvote
    mcp got a reaction from ex Elly in Lithium v AGM   
    If you are interested in the size differences and electrical differences of lithium Iron Phosphate and Lead Acid AGM batteries,  I have started to put my battery compartment together this weekend.
    On the left is a Vision FM100 AGM battery, 100ah @ 12v nominal,  which is my start battery [currently running the fridge and lights] and on the right are 12 x 150ah LiFePo4 cells, 450ah @ 12v nominal.  
    On the left the AGM weight is 32kgs and on the right the LiFePo4 pack weights all up 34kgs.  
    On the left we have 30ah usable @ the recommended 30% depth of discharge and on the right we have 360ah usable @ the recommended 80% depth of discharge.
    On the left its costs $395 on the right $2800 [included in this price is $895nzd of shipping]
    On the left cost per usable ah = $13.16 and on the right cost per usable ah = $7.77
    On the left lifespan/cycles 500-700 and on the right 3000-5000 [or more, but there's a caveat to this].
    On the left charge efficiency 85-90% and on the right 98-99%    

  6. Upvote
    mcp got a reaction from Sudden5869 in Lithium v AGM   
    If you are interested in the size differences and electrical differences of lithium Iron Phosphate and Lead Acid AGM batteries,  I have started to put my battery compartment together this weekend.
    On the left is a Vision FM100 AGM battery, 100ah @ 12v nominal,  which is my start battery [currently running the fridge and lights] and on the right are 12 x 150ah LiFePo4 cells, 450ah @ 12v nominal.  
    On the left the AGM weight is 32kgs and on the right the LiFePo4 pack weights all up 34kgs.  
    On the left we have 30ah usable @ the recommended 30% depth of discharge and on the right we have 360ah usable @ the recommended 80% depth of discharge.
    On the left its costs $395 on the right $2800 [included in this price is $895nzd of shipping]
    On the left cost per usable ah = $13.16 and on the right cost per usable ah = $7.77
    On the left lifespan/cycles 500-700 and on the right 3000-5000 [or more, but there's a caveat to this].
    On the left charge efficiency 85-90% and on the right 98-99%    

  7. Upvote
    mcp got a reaction from Fish in Lithium v AGM   
    If you are interested in the size differences and electrical differences of lithium Iron Phosphate and Lead Acid AGM batteries,  I have started to put my battery compartment together this weekend.
    On the left is a Vision FM100 AGM battery, 100ah @ 12v nominal,  which is my start battery [currently running the fridge and lights] and on the right are 12 x 150ah LiFePo4 cells, 450ah @ 12v nominal.  
    On the left the AGM weight is 32kgs and on the right the LiFePo4 pack weights all up 34kgs.  
    On the left we have 30ah usable @ the recommended 30% depth of discharge and on the right we have 360ah usable @ the recommended 80% depth of discharge.
    On the left its costs $395 on the right $2800 [included in this price is $895nzd of shipping]
    On the left cost per usable ah = $13.16 and on the right cost per usable ah = $7.77
    On the left lifespan/cycles 500-700 and on the right 3000-5000 [or more, but there's a caveat to this].
    On the left charge efficiency 85-90% and on the right 98-99%    

  8. Upvote
    mcp got a reaction from Fogg in Lithium v AGM   
    If you are interested in the size differences and electrical differences of lithium Iron Phosphate and Lead Acid AGM batteries,  I have started to put my battery compartment together this weekend.
    On the left is a Vision FM100 AGM battery, 100ah @ 12v nominal,  which is my start battery [currently running the fridge and lights] and on the right are 12 x 150ah LiFePo4 cells, 450ah @ 12v nominal.  
    On the left the AGM weight is 32kgs and on the right the LiFePo4 pack weights all up 34kgs.  
    On the left we have 30ah usable @ the recommended 30% depth of discharge and on the right we have 360ah usable @ the recommended 80% depth of discharge.
    On the left its costs $395 on the right $2800 [included in this price is $895nzd of shipping]
    On the left cost per usable ah = $13.16 and on the right cost per usable ah = $7.77
    On the left lifespan/cycles 500-700 and on the right 3000-5000 [or more, but there's a caveat to this].
    On the left charge efficiency 85-90% and on the right 98-99%    

  9. Like
    mcp got a reaction from aardvarkash10 in Testing process for Navman 2100 depth gauge   
    If you have access to an oscilloscope and can use one? you could test it's output and input.  There will be a common ground and a input signal with a AC signal that the unit is rated for ie; 50kHz, 80kHz, 200kHz, 235kHz, etc.   The output signal will be similar frequency but the amplitude will vary a lot.  If you have a frequency generator handy as well we can measure the impedance magnitude and series resistance.  Those two figures should be very close if the transducer is working mechanically correct.  
    But.
    You could also check that its output is working by turning it on briefly and listening to it from its side,  you should hear a consistent clicking noise that is reasonably quick or a slight hum.  It will be faint,  so do it in a very quiet place, or record with your phone and boost the volume on playback. 
    Don't run it for long out of water, it could over heat if its a high output model and don't hold it up to your ear from the bottom.
    YMMV
  10. Upvote
    mcp got a reaction from lateral in Carbon foam   
    Neither of those are Ideal for a Narada or Firefly type lead carbon batteries.   The Voltronic should be okay if you use the lead acid setting with fireflys as long as you have the temperature senor and temp compensation enabled.  
    In all honesty if you are going to change to modern battery chemistries  in most cases the charge sources will need upgrading to.  
  11. Upvote
    mcp got a reaction from lateral in More on marine batteries...   
    You don't need a BMS for a lithium iron phosphate either.  Its just that peoples knowledge of batteries is based around Lead acid variants and they think they know stuff.  So the BMS is actually there to protect the battery from the human in most cases.  Also,  thermal runaway does not happen with the lifepo4 types used in marine batts.  Flooded lead is by far the most dangerous battery technology used on boats.  
     
     
    Anyway,  of topic.     So back to the original question.    
     
    When you head off for the horizon,  are you going to have refrigerators and inverters,  etc?  or just what you have now?  
  12. Upvote
    mcp reacted to Tamure in Crayfish to returned to the sea   
    Not quite sure what youre saying but Ive seen hunting greed first hand and we'd all be better off if people only took a fair share for their tables. The cray fishery is hammered, totally smashed by professionals and amateurs alike, I can see it as most people who have dived for 40 years can. Best thing would be a total moratorium for a significant period especially in the gulf.
     
    When I was a kid I found a nest of crays north of the ninepin in the BOI, super shallow, almost flippers out of the water material. There would have be 100 plus in there including a heap of really massive reds. I think owing to its unique location it had been overlooked pretty much forever but over a period of months me and my mates returned repeatedly and cleaned that cave out. I went back to it next summer then multiple times over a 10 year period and it remained empty. Big lesson in greed and damage, and I barely if ever take a cray these days, prefer to check 'em out and show my boys that amazing undersea world. Anyway crays are overrated and are a bit of a status symbol at restaurant.
     
    People have short memories, up until the early 60's a working mans lunch was cray and chips in newspaper. One of the regular jobs at my granddads fish shop was to put sugar sacks full of crays into the copper every day or two, 7 minutes for a small one 15 for a big one. Then the boom came and it was priced out of reach. 
     
    https://teara.govt.nz/en/video/6288/crayfishing
  13. Upvote
    mcp reacted to Tamure in Anyone know this fish stealing tosser?   
    Fishing is torture? Not going down that rabbit hole, I think its commendable that serious sportfishers catch and release although I am not sure of the survival rate. 
     
    The best thing you can do to protect the fisheries is not be part of the problem; do you really need that next fish, shall I keep that borderline one, lets not chuck that overboard, lets pick up that floating plastic bag.... 
  14. Upvote
    mcp reacted to ex TL systems in Flexible solar panels   
    I bought 5 cheap ones but only one has failed so far. The one that was out in the sun for a year. The four that are still in the box are lasting quite well!
  15. Upvote
    mcp reacted to raz88 in Anyone know this fish stealing tosser?   
    0800 4 poacher
  16. Upvote
    mcp reacted to wheels in Tef-gel or?   
    The more important point you have missed is between the step and the mast. You need an insulator of some kind. The best is to use a Polyurathane adhesive/sealant as a bedding compound and bond the step to the mast. Smear it on the fastening and that takes care of the fastening at the same time.
    If you happen to use a threaded fastener, use antiseize. I have tried many over the years and have slowly come back to the old tried and true proper antiseize products. That is not to say that Tefgel does not work. But aniseize is a complex product made for the specific purpose.
  17. Upvote
    mcp got a reaction from ex Elly in Dock lines   
    Thanks guys.   I have my new docklines via CRA.  Sharp pricing compared to other companies as well.
  18. Upvote
    mcp reacted to Island Time in Stern lines   
    A couple of bits of chain or wire rope is a good addition, but I dont like anchor ropes - they normally sink, and are very difficult to pull out with a dingy. Floating ropes are heaps easier.
    Method. Look at the chart and sonar (fwd scan is great for this) and pick a likely spot. Approach it and select likely stern line points. We carry 110m of chain, and would often drop anchor about 60m or so from the beach,  put out about 60m of chain, then approach the beach, lower the dingy, and take the stern line ashore. Put a line around a tree or rock, (we like trees) - take the line back to the boat so you can cast off from aboard if you need to. A single stern line is often all you need, but 2 well spaced is better and controls the boat position more. Then, watching the depth under the rudder, allow for the tide and any sea state (usually calm if you are in the right spot), and pull the boat in as far as you can. Pay out or adjust the anchor chain as required. As the anchor is pulling uphill, the scope is not so critical. Also, as you are anchored stern to the hill/mountain to weather, the stern lines take the most load, unless there are large side gusts. 
    Often, when the weather was bad, we found that if you were sufficiently close in to shore, the gusts would go over the boat, and hit the water a boat length or two in front, missing us almost entirely.
    Then there is the story of the tree we were tied to being blown down... but that's for another time.
  19. Upvote
    mcp reacted to wheels in Battery Choice   
    Hi Winter, are you looking at batteries based on budget, or are you after quality? the one you are looking at is probably not the best for either. I and I am sure a few others could give you some suggestions if you want.
  20. Upvote
    mcp got a reaction from lateral in Battery charger an solar   
    Wheels no and sorry, I do not want to disrespect you as you are very knowledgeable in so many technical areas and have taught me tons about repairs and other little golden musings while reading your posts on this website......but without being a load the battery can not be charged.   Also,  because a battery heats and gases, this proves the battery is a resistive load to the charger. Ohms law applies to every circuit..always.
     
    Multistage chargers are made out to be super technical devices and they really are not.  Some of them that are running FPGA's [Field programmable gate array's - for IslandTime] where firmware can be updated and they can integrate with other systems are getting quite clever.  But the charge circuits themselves do a relatively straight forward job and are not complicated.  The stages are labeled so they sound fancy, 3 or 5 or 7 stages,  they describe the stages that the battery is at.  There really are only two stages of a multistage charger and that is charge and float.  The rest is a description of what the battery is doing and what the marketing department use. 
     
    Luigi - EMF / Electromotive force is going to describe changing another type of energy into an electrical energy and describe its potential for work [in volts]  ie: a wind turbine will convert wind energy into electrical energy,  is where you would use emf in your example/description.  A cell in a solar panel would be another great example.
  21. Upvote
    mcp got a reaction from Rehabilitated in A new marine pest   
    Probably not until there is a well written email/letter to someone in the media, that picks up the story and runs with it.   A half decent journalist will rip their reasoning apart with simple questioning. 
     
    Is there a wordsmith/spin doctor in the forum with contacts? 
  22. Upvote
    mcp got a reaction from Vorpal Blade in YNZ Race Regulations Cat1-Cat5; Anomalies and concerns   
    I find it very hard to fault this post.   So.... +1
  23. Upvote
    mcp reacted to Fish in YNZ Race Regulations Cat1-Cat5; Anomalies and concerns   
    My concern is that your are replacing one set or arbitrary requirements with a new set of arbitrary requirements. And these ones are likely to have a number of unintended consequences (more so than the current lot). Firstly the obvious question around a pathway for gaining experience. Then, the likelihood of taking large numbers of semi competent crew just to meet the criteria, as opposed to crew who work well together and can actually deal with problems. And the obvious disadvantage of solo and short handed crew (i.e. the majority of cruisers, going as couples etc).
     
    I believe the fundamental problem is a prescriptive list of requirements. If you applied modern risk management protocols to it, the regs and outcomes would be entirely different. People have commented that the inspection itself is of value (i.e. an independent separate set of eyes). The complaints are around costs, the arbitrary nature of the requirements, and often the lack of relevance to a particular situation.
     
    An effective risk based approach would look something like the following -
    YNZ outline topic headings that must be addressed. The skipper can address them in any way they see fit. The overall boat / skipper / crew combo has an assessment via the current inspector arrangements.
     
    Example risk topics are:
    Fire
    Lost comms
    Damaged rudder
    Sudden ingress of water
    Lost mast
    MoB
    Navigation competency 
    etc.
     
    The onus is put on the skipper to determine what is required, and then demonstrate that. I initially envisaged a written type document (similar to a Standard operating procedures manual or an H&S risk assessment) but to be honest, it is probably more value with the inspector doing it verbally, on the basis that topic headings are known beforehand, and there is a clearly identified outcomes. This way better solutions can be arrived at by interaction with the inspector and skipper.
     
    Examples of this could be "skipper has considered night nav, including with boat wide power outage", instead of "thou shall carry a hand held compass"...This option gives the viking in you the opportunity to state that you will just steer by the Pole Star, as you do anyway, or your tablet based digital accelerometer compass unit on your smart phone, if your a tech geek kind of guy. i.e. solutions that suit the type of skipper and type of boat, and closely match the specific situation.
     
    The key advantage here is it forces the skipper to consider their own set up, what they would do, and take ownership of it. It allows for situation specific outcomes, and allows for innovation and accommodates advancing tech. It will probably scare the crap out of bureaucrats, because it doesn't give a nice prescriptive arse covering but invisible protective coat.
     
    In short, YNZ prescribe the outcomes required, not the gear carried etc. The trick will be in avoiding too much paperwork to make the system work. Ideally, YNZ's topic headings wouldn't be more than 1 page or risk areas on a boat.
  24. Upvote
    mcp reacted to Black Panther in A Word from YNZ   
    I'll try once more. Cat one can be made optional for cruisers. No problem.
  25. Upvote
    mcp reacted to Steve Pope in A Word from YNZ   
    From the Golden Globe Race Committee: Imo. relevant to Cat 1 and if taken with a dose of common sense could / should make cat 1 redundant
     
    The changes to the notice of race may surprise many. We do NOT mandate a drogue or special storm training or mandatory guidelines on masts and spars, as some suggest we could. In fact we have dropped all previous regulations that existed on masts and spars (other than lengths) and are leaving this critical issue entirely to the skippers. This is in the true spirit of the GGR. They know what to expect. We and they, are and have been, talking about it at length. Their riggers and mast makers are acutely aware of the serious challenge. they saw what happened. anything we mandate is not relevant. If the GGR said entrants must have a rig like X with Y and include Z, we would be creating a one design fleet, which no one wants.
    In relation to storm tactics and equipment like storm drogues, no individual or expert exists with a sure solution, or the ultimate answer. Every boat, storm, wave pattern and situation IS different, so we will NOT regulate what the entrants must do, or should have. Like all good sailors, we keep discussing it, learning and researching, then make our own decisions and face our own destiny. their life is in their hands. If there is one thing all entrants are very aware of and serious about, it is how they plan to survive the Southern Ocean. They do not need us to tell them and we have no guarantee to give.
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