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grantmc

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  1. Upvote
    grantmc got a reaction from Rickinz in NZ to Fiji   
    Not a boat many would wish to own, and certainly not a keel boat I would suggest you aspire to Rick.
    I sailed on an old race boat, very expensive to maintain and lacks creature comforts. Her name now is Nv.

    Nv is an Open 60 (modified for a little more length) with a 4.something mtr keel. Designed by Nándor Fa, she was built to compete in the  Vendée Globe round the world race. 
    She was an Ozzie boat for a long time, renamed The Broomstick, doing charters and races. Here's her entry in the 2001 Sydney to Hobart. The Ozzie owner added a decent galley and toilet, but other than that, she's still pretty basic. 

    My positive comments were in respect to sailing the voyage. Subsequently renamed yet again, currently called Nv, she is very long and provides a very nice ride indeed. We were in no hurray, as any time less than 14 days we had to serve in quarantine, so we sailed conservatively. But it was a good learning for me personally, as I was able to play with some pretty technical gear I'd neve before been exposed to.

    But what made the trip especially pleasant was we had a crew of 7, so only two rotating watches each day. Also we had a couple of very keen and accomplished cooks on board and at every meal we were treated to the most amazing fodder.

    And rhetorically, what makes a long passage a good one? I think a big part to the answer is a crew that gets on together and has lots of laughs. We certainly had that and since the trip we've all been keeping in touch.



  2. Like
    grantmc got a reaction from Rickinz in NZ to Fiji   
    Thought I'd close the topic by confirming I cleared into Fiji last Friday at the end of a 7 day quarantine off Denerau. Trip up from BoI was awesome. Fantastic crew (including a couple of highly capable cooks), and a nice comfy quick boat. We had some great laughs, brilliant music, wit only a single day/night of rain. Wind on the nose the entire trip, but you can't have everything.
    Very happy to have finally boarded my own boat here in Savusavu.
     
  3. Upvote
    grantmc got a reaction from w44vi in NZ to Fiji   
    Thought I'd close the topic by confirming I cleared into Fiji last Friday at the end of a 7 day quarantine off Denerau. Trip up from BoI was awesome. Fantastic crew (including a couple of highly capable cooks), and a nice comfy quick boat. We had some great laughs, brilliant music, wit only a single day/night of rain. Wind on the nose the entire trip, but you can't have everything.
    Very happy to have finally boarded my own boat here in Savusavu.
     
  4. Upvote
    grantmc reacted to KM... in Says it all...   
    Hmmm.... yeap the usual.
    I don't know what it is but YNZ seem to be going out of their way to not recognise the problem they have. One is arrogance but many put that down to leadership being there so long it;s become a fiefdom, there are many signs there is something to that, how much is debatable. But the big one is this insistence they are club only yet they want direct access to the individuals. They seem either unwilling to accept if they go to the individual the individuals will regard YNZ as there for them. Ask around and most individuals do think YNZ is there for them, ask YNZ and they say Oh No that's not us we're only here for the clubs. So I do think YNZ is the author of much of the grief being aimed and attributed to them.
    The arrogance bit is due to YNZ near demanding clubs break the laws of the land just to suit their end game which is not the people whose info they are demanding. I do use the word 'demanding' intentionally, something else that does them no favours.
    The law we can't pass over info without asking permission first is not new, it;s been in for quite a long time. I asked my people and some were OK with the info being passed on but some sure weren't. But YNZ told me 'we want everyones or no ones' so we gave them no ones. That does seem to go against what they say they want the info for which just adds to the amount of haze boaties are trying to peer though to see why YNZ is really about.
  5. Upvote
    grantmc got a reaction from harrytom in Says it all...   
    In operation the difference is far more efficacious than just semantics. Individuals are not members. Clubs are the members. Clubs are mostly dominated by small groups of people, most of whom are long term conservatives (in respect to sailing, and typically focused on racing). Thus getting any change, widening the doors to welcome non racing sailors is very difficult at both levels; the governing body and the Clubs. 

    Perhaps ponder for a moment your own club(s). If you brought a member from 1970 in a time machine to today, would they notice any significance difference between the programmes run then and those being run now? Certainly at the Clubs I belong to, it would be minimal. But more importantly the vast majority of new (Club) members leave disillusioned within a year or two. They soon come to understand the old guard is not going to change or try new things. Most long term members seem ok to watch as year after year their club at best stagnates and more often slowly shrinks of members.

    YNZ reflects that conservatism, and that unwillingness to change. Contrast that with Yachting Australia a handful of years ago. YA recognised and acknowledged that problem, and undertook a series of steps, including the Gemba report to rejuvenate the sport at the base level. And OK it hasn't all been sunshine and roses, but it certainly stirred things up and started a process to bring sailing in to the 21st century. That needs to happen here too.

    You might look it another way. Next time you're at your Club or attend a course/seminar take a look around for diversity. Perhaps the 3 Clubs and sailing region that I associate with are exceptions, but I rarely see brown faces, and there is a distinct lack of female sailors. That's not so true for the children's learn to sail programmes, but 95% of kids only do a single season and we never see them again. But then you hardly see any brown faces at children's regattas either.  Add in training camps. courses, seminars, etc and it's an even worse story. And I should add I'm using brown face not literally but as a metaphor for self entitled non white people mostly with financial substance.
  6. Upvote
    grantmc got a reaction from SpareHand in Says it all...   
    In operation the difference is far more efficacious than just semantics. Individuals are not members. Clubs are the members. Clubs are mostly dominated by small groups of people, most of whom are long term conservatives (in respect to sailing, and typically focused on racing). Thus getting any change, widening the doors to welcome non racing sailors is very difficult at both levels; the governing body and the Clubs. 

    Perhaps ponder for a moment your own club(s). If you brought a member from 1970 in a time machine to today, would they notice any significance difference between the programmes run then and those being run now? Certainly at the Clubs I belong to, it would be minimal. But more importantly the vast majority of new (Club) members leave disillusioned within a year or two. They soon come to understand the old guard is not going to change or try new things. Most long term members seem ok to watch as year after year their club at best stagnates and more often slowly shrinks of members.

    YNZ reflects that conservatism, and that unwillingness to change. Contrast that with Yachting Australia a handful of years ago. YA recognised and acknowledged that problem, and undertook a series of steps, including the Gemba report to rejuvenate the sport at the base level. And OK it hasn't all been sunshine and roses, but it certainly stirred things up and started a process to bring sailing in to the 21st century. That needs to happen here too.

    You might look it another way. Next time you're at your Club or attend a course/seminar take a look around for diversity. Perhaps the 3 Clubs and sailing region that I associate with are exceptions, but I rarely see brown faces, and there is a distinct lack of female sailors. That's not so true for the children's learn to sail programmes, but 95% of kids only do a single season and we never see them again. But then you hardly see any brown faces at children's regattas either.  Add in training camps. courses, seminars, etc and it's an even worse story. And I should add I'm using brown face not literally but as a metaphor for self entitled non white people mostly with financial substance.
  7. Like
    grantmc got a reaction from SpareHand in NZ to Fiji   
    Thought I'd close the topic by confirming I cleared into Fiji last Friday at the end of a 7 day quarantine off Denerau. Trip up from BoI was awesome. Fantastic crew (including a couple of highly capable cooks), and a nice comfy quick boat. We had some great laughs, brilliant music, wit only a single day/night of rain. Wind on the nose the entire trip, but you can't have everything.
    Very happy to have finally boarded my own boat here in Savusavu.
     
  8. Upvote
    grantmc got a reaction from ex Elly in NZ to Fiji   
    Thought I'd close the topic by confirming I cleared into Fiji last Friday at the end of a 7 day quarantine off Denerau. Trip up from BoI was awesome. Fantastic crew (including a couple of highly capable cooks), and a nice comfy quick boat. We had some great laughs, brilliant music, wit only a single day/night of rain. Wind on the nose the entire trip, but you can't have everything.
    Very happy to have finally boarded my own boat here in Savusavu.
     
  9. Upvote
    grantmc got a reaction from Sabre in NZ to Fiji   
    Thought I'd close the topic by confirming I cleared into Fiji last Friday at the end of a 7 day quarantine off Denerau. Trip up from BoI was awesome. Fantastic crew (including a couple of highly capable cooks), and a nice comfy quick boat. We had some great laughs, brilliant music, wit only a single day/night of rain. Wind on the nose the entire trip, but you can't have everything.
    Very happy to have finally boarded my own boat here in Savusavu.
     
  10. Upvote
    grantmc got a reaction from Chloe in Seafaring nation?   
    I can make a comment on the point made. This has happened to me. 3 years ago I crewed on an Australian registered yacht and we cleared and departed Tauranga. We had all manner of issues with the boat and as you might deduce she wasn't up to the intended overseas passage. It wont help top get in to details, blame etc. But after several days the owner/skipper accepted the only option was to turn back. As it happened, and I think for reasons of anonymity, the Skipper choose Gisborne, and so Customs were radioed and gave permission to enter NZ. Gisborne isn't normally a port of entry. When we berthed the Customs agent was at the wharf to meet us; she'd driven up from Napier that day especially to clear us in.

    The process was very simple, because we'd returned within 14 days of departure (and hadn't actually gone anywhere) they just cancelled our outward clearance from Tauranga. Technically the record states we never left NZ. The Customs Officer told us it happens more often than one might think. With Covid I'd presume we'd have been required to do the 14 days isolation/quarantine, but I don't know that for sure.

    So Customs do have a process for failed departures. I gather it's pretty much the same for planes that need to turn round and return.

     
  11. Upvote
    grantmc reacted to SloopJohnB in Was your hardware store like is when you growing up 1960"s   
    Not quite... but what a treasure mine.
     
  12. Upvote
    grantmc got a reaction from Black Panther in Damn the Rules, Rocna Inventor doing the NW Passage   
    I didn’t intend to slide off topic again. I added the post about Okak because the village is on the NW passage and suffered enormously from a white man’s disease. Like all the little villages, hamlets and towns in the far north there isn’t much in the way of medical facilities or evacuation options. Even in 2020!
    Irrespective, Wheels and Priscilla have rightly brought up the 1919 flu and the horrific effect for Samoa. But you don’t have to look back very far at all to when another disease rampaged Samoa. Only last year they experienced a measles outbreak that decimated the country.
     August last year, yes 2019, an infected passenger arrived from Auckland. That resulted in an outbreak that killed and killed for months.
    The Lancet reported:
    On Oct 16, 2019, the Samoan Ministry of Health declared a measles outbreak, the first Pacific island country to do so in the current global resurgence of measles. 
    As of Jan 22, 2020, 5707 measles cases and 83 measles-related deaths (estimated attack rate of approximately 285 cases per 10 000 population) have been reported. 
    87% of deaths have been reported as children younger than 5 years, a mortality rate of approximately 25 deaths per 10 000 people in this age group.
    At least 20% of babies aged six to 11 months have contracted measles and one in 150 babies have died.
    As of 20 December, 94% of the population had been vaccinated.
    A state of emergency was declared on 17 November, ordering the closure of all schools, keeping children under 17 away from public events, and vaccination became mandatory. On 2 December 2019, the government imposed a curfew and cancelled all Christmas celebrations and public gatherings. All unvaccinated families were ordered to display a red flag or cloth in front of their homes to warn others and to aid mass vaccination efforts. Some families added messages like “Help!” or “I want to live!”.

    5 and 6 December, the government shut down everything to bring civil servants over to the vaccination campaign. The curfew was lifted on 7 December when the government estimated that 90% of the population had been reached by the vaccination program. On 14 December, the state of emergency was extended to 29 December. Finally, as of 22 December, an estimated 94% of the eligible population had been vaccinated.
    So poor old Samoa went from a horrifying and deadly experience, with the lock down finally ending at Christmas, only to find a new disease threat waiting to hop aboard an Air NZ flight and break out early this year. And of course they’ve had their borders firmly shut since 21 March.

    The lesson is that there are still real risks for people. There’s a dangerous potion when you’ve mixed together some poverty, isolation, minimal medical resources and a lack of any immunity, and yes, to bring us back to the topic, the white man’s greed and arrogance.

    When I read the RNZ article kindly linked by Priscilla II, I couldn’t but postulate that Colonel Robert Logan and Pete Smith must be related; they act with attitudes of such similarity.
     
  13. Upvote
    grantmc reacted to Priscilla II in Damn the Rules, Rocna Inventor doing the NW Passage   
    https://www.rnz.co.nz/international/pacific-news/375404/how-nz-took-influenza-to-samoa-killing-a-fifth-of-its-population
  14. Upvote
    grantmc got a reaction from armchairadmiral in Damn the Rules, Rocna Inventor doing the NW Passage   
    Not wishing to aggravate the sin or virtues of the voyage. And I hope within the bounds of the original post that I made about sailing the northern extremes of Canada. I thought there might be an interest in the little town of Okak (sometimes spelt Okkak). Kiwi Roa will likely sail past Okak, found in the northern extremes of Labrador, perhaps even stop there as this is well south of the ‘finish line’ of the passage.
    Scientists tell us Okak, an Inuit village, has been constantly settled for over 5,000 years. At the turn of last century Okak held the largest Inuit community in Labrador and was the site of a Moravian mission that had been established in 1776. Twice each year the supply/trade ship Harmony visited both to supply goods and take away Okak’s produce.
    So why is Okak special? Well 4 November 1918 the Harmony visited the little town, where she remained for 4 days before continuing her supply mission up the coast. Within two weeks, 70 residents had died, by the end of December 204 people of the total population of 263 had perished. Not a single male Inuit survived. Many bodies were dismembered and mutilated by the settlement’s starving dogs.
    Here’s a quote from the book Northern Lights by Desmond Holdridge: “And thus, on the Mission bark Harmony,” wrote Holdridge, “had come the pestilence generated on battlefields, three thousand miles away, of a war that had less to do with the destinies of the Eskimo, on the face of it, than Polynesian morals have to do with double-entry bookkeeping.”
    Holdridge quoted at length one Caucasian survivor who described to him the aftermath:
    Dear God, we couldn’t bury them; there weren’t half a dozen able-bodied men in the village to lend a hand. Men I’d known well. Girls. Old ladies that made good boots. And the men and the women, they lay there dying and saying it was the end of the world. They called that thing Spanish influenza, but to me it was that the door to Hell was left ajar for a while and the smoke and stink of it got out to kill people. The dogs got into the houses and ate the bodies; they killed some of the people who were not dead, but too weak to drive them off.

    You’ve seen the mounds around the village; it was where the bodies were so many that we couldn’t take care of them when help came from Nain; we just smashed the houses down on top of them and covered the wreckage with sod. That’s all the grave most of them got. The ice came in for a while and some of the dead we just pushed under it and let them go to sea. And a couple of years later some of them came ashore again. The noses and ears and fingers had been eaten by the fish but otherwise they were all right; I could recognize every one.

    I’ve included a link to a doco from 1985. Just a warning that the film is difficult to watch. https://youtu.be/Ts3hFJOLFuo
    Today Okak is abandoned, so the town’s brass band won’t be there to greet Pete Smith if he happens to call in and look at the site. 
     





  15. Upvote
    grantmc got a reaction from 2flit in Damn the Rules, Rocna Inventor doing the NW Passage   
    Not wishing to aggravate the sin or virtues of the voyage. And I hope within the bounds of the original post that I made about sailing the northern extremes of Canada. I thought there might be an interest in the little town of Okak (sometimes spelt Okkak). Kiwi Roa will likely sail past Okak, found in the northern extremes of Labrador, perhaps even stop there as this is well south of the ‘finish line’ of the passage.
    Scientists tell us Okak, an Inuit village, has been constantly settled for over 5,000 years. At the turn of last century Okak held the largest Inuit community in Labrador and was the site of a Moravian mission that had been established in 1776. Twice each year the supply/trade ship Harmony visited both to supply goods and take away Okak’s produce.
    So why is Okak special? Well 4 November 1918 the Harmony visited the little town, where she remained for 4 days before continuing her supply mission up the coast. Within two weeks, 70 residents had died, by the end of December 204 people of the total population of 263 had perished. Not a single male Inuit survived. Many bodies were dismembered and mutilated by the settlement’s starving dogs.
    Here’s a quote from the book Northern Lights by Desmond Holdridge: “And thus, on the Mission bark Harmony,” wrote Holdridge, “had come the pestilence generated on battlefields, three thousand miles away, of a war that had less to do with the destinies of the Eskimo, on the face of it, than Polynesian morals have to do with double-entry bookkeeping.”
    Holdridge quoted at length one Caucasian survivor who described to him the aftermath:
    Dear God, we couldn’t bury them; there weren’t half a dozen able-bodied men in the village to lend a hand. Men I’d known well. Girls. Old ladies that made good boots. And the men and the women, they lay there dying and saying it was the end of the world. They called that thing Spanish influenza, but to me it was that the door to Hell was left ajar for a while and the smoke and stink of it got out to kill people. The dogs got into the houses and ate the bodies; they killed some of the people who were not dead, but too weak to drive them off.

    You’ve seen the mounds around the village; it was where the bodies were so many that we couldn’t take care of them when help came from Nain; we just smashed the houses down on top of them and covered the wreckage with sod. That’s all the grave most of them got. The ice came in for a while and some of the dead we just pushed under it and let them go to sea. And a couple of years later some of them came ashore again. The noses and ears and fingers had been eaten by the fish but otherwise they were all right; I could recognize every one.

    I’ve included a link to a doco from 1985. Just a warning that the film is difficult to watch. https://youtu.be/Ts3hFJOLFuo
    Today Okak is abandoned, so the town’s brass band won’t be there to greet Pete Smith if he happens to call in and look at the site. 
     





  16. Upvote
    grantmc got a reaction from lateral in Damn the Rules, Rocna Inventor doing the NW Passage   
    Not wishing to aggravate the sin or virtues of the voyage. And I hope within the bounds of the original post that I made about sailing the northern extremes of Canada. I thought there might be an interest in the little town of Okak (sometimes spelt Okkak). Kiwi Roa will likely sail past Okak, found in the northern extremes of Labrador, perhaps even stop there as this is well south of the ‘finish line’ of the passage.
    Scientists tell us Okak, an Inuit village, has been constantly settled for over 5,000 years. At the turn of last century Okak held the largest Inuit community in Labrador and was the site of a Moravian mission that had been established in 1776. Twice each year the supply/trade ship Harmony visited both to supply goods and take away Okak’s produce.
    So why is Okak special? Well 4 November 1918 the Harmony visited the little town, where she remained for 4 days before continuing her supply mission up the coast. Within two weeks, 70 residents had died, by the end of December 204 people of the total population of 263 had perished. Not a single male Inuit survived. Many bodies were dismembered and mutilated by the settlement’s starving dogs.
    Here’s a quote from the book Northern Lights by Desmond Holdridge: “And thus, on the Mission bark Harmony,” wrote Holdridge, “had come the pestilence generated on battlefields, three thousand miles away, of a war that had less to do with the destinies of the Eskimo, on the face of it, than Polynesian morals have to do with double-entry bookkeeping.”
    Holdridge quoted at length one Caucasian survivor who described to him the aftermath:
    Dear God, we couldn’t bury them; there weren’t half a dozen able-bodied men in the village to lend a hand. Men I’d known well. Girls. Old ladies that made good boots. And the men and the women, they lay there dying and saying it was the end of the world. They called that thing Spanish influenza, but to me it was that the door to Hell was left ajar for a while and the smoke and stink of it got out to kill people. The dogs got into the houses and ate the bodies; they killed some of the people who were not dead, but too weak to drive them off.

    You’ve seen the mounds around the village; it was where the bodies were so many that we couldn’t take care of them when help came from Nain; we just smashed the houses down on top of them and covered the wreckage with sod. That’s all the grave most of them got. The ice came in for a while and some of the dead we just pushed under it and let them go to sea. And a couple of years later some of them came ashore again. The noses and ears and fingers had been eaten by the fish but otherwise they were all right; I could recognize every one.

    I’ve included a link to a doco from 1985. Just a warning that the film is difficult to watch. https://youtu.be/Ts3hFJOLFuo
    Today Okak is abandoned, so the town’s brass band won’t be there to greet Pete Smith if he happens to call in and look at the site. 
     





  17. Upvote
    grantmc got a reaction from jim s in Damn the Rules, Rocna Inventor doing the NW Passage   
    Not wishing to aggravate the sin or virtues of the voyage. And I hope within the bounds of the original post that I made about sailing the northern extremes of Canada. I thought there might be an interest in the little town of Okak (sometimes spelt Okkak). Kiwi Roa will likely sail past Okak, found in the northern extremes of Labrador, perhaps even stop there as this is well south of the ‘finish line’ of the passage.
    Scientists tell us Okak, an Inuit village, has been constantly settled for over 5,000 years. At the turn of last century Okak held the largest Inuit community in Labrador and was the site of a Moravian mission that had been established in 1776. Twice each year the supply/trade ship Harmony visited both to supply goods and take away Okak’s produce.
    So why is Okak special? Well 4 November 1918 the Harmony visited the little town, where she remained for 4 days before continuing her supply mission up the coast. Within two weeks, 70 residents had died, by the end of December 204 people of the total population of 263 had perished. Not a single male Inuit survived. Many bodies were dismembered and mutilated by the settlement’s starving dogs.
    Here’s a quote from the book Northern Lights by Desmond Holdridge: “And thus, on the Mission bark Harmony,” wrote Holdridge, “had come the pestilence generated on battlefields, three thousand miles away, of a war that had less to do with the destinies of the Eskimo, on the face of it, than Polynesian morals have to do with double-entry bookkeeping.”
    Holdridge quoted at length one Caucasian survivor who described to him the aftermath:
    Dear God, we couldn’t bury them; there weren’t half a dozen able-bodied men in the village to lend a hand. Men I’d known well. Girls. Old ladies that made good boots. And the men and the women, they lay there dying and saying it was the end of the world. They called that thing Spanish influenza, but to me it was that the door to Hell was left ajar for a while and the smoke and stink of it got out to kill people. The dogs got into the houses and ate the bodies; they killed some of the people who were not dead, but too weak to drive them off.

    You’ve seen the mounds around the village; it was where the bodies were so many that we couldn’t take care of them when help came from Nain; we just smashed the houses down on top of them and covered the wreckage with sod. That’s all the grave most of them got. The ice came in for a while and some of the dead we just pushed under it and let them go to sea. And a couple of years later some of them came ashore again. The noses and ears and fingers had been eaten by the fish but otherwise they were all right; I could recognize every one.

    I’ve included a link to a doco from 1985. Just a warning that the film is difficult to watch. https://youtu.be/Ts3hFJOLFuo
    Today Okak is abandoned, so the town’s brass band won’t be there to greet Pete Smith if he happens to call in and look at the site. 
     





  18. Upvote
    grantmc reacted to Island Time in Damn the Rules, Rocna Inventor doing the NW Passage   
    Any further posts to this thread on any topic other than the titled topic will be removed. If you guys want to talk about refugees etc, make a new topic in small talk. Please.
  19. Upvote
    grantmc got a reaction from Sabre in Damn the Rules, Rocna Inventor doing the NW Passage   
    Just thought that to try and keep the thread on track, and perhaps add a little sanity, here's a reminder of the Kiwis who've completed a successful NW passage:
    2000    Evohe (25m yacht)    Stephen Kafka
    2009    Tyhina (10.4m yacht)    Peter Elliot
    2010    Astral Express (12.5m yacht)    Graeme Kendall single handed over two seasons
    2011    Kotuku (12m yacht)    Ian Douglass
    2012    Tokimata (13m yacht)    Peter Garden
    2017    Larissa (13.7m cutter)    Mark Domney
    2017    Tiama (15.2m skoop)    Hank Haazen

    Just to add Australia have had only 6 successes including 3 by Roger Wallis (Philos in 2012 and again 2014, then in 2017 on Abel Tasman).

    Thus it's a very select group that Pete Evans will soon join.
    In total 123 yachts have made a successful transit, the first of course was the Norweigian 21m yacht Gjøa captained by Roald Amundsen in 1903.  
    About 30 of these had to winter over and so took two seasons.

    The journey is arduous and fraught with danger. And the trip has brought many a dream to a cold and premature end.
    I can appreciate the frustration that Pete Evans will have experienced, no doubt that included all manner of preparation and planning; not to ignore considerable expense.
    We can agree here on this forum, I hope, to at least all wish him a safe and successful voyage.
  20. Upvote
    grantmc got a reaction from jim s in Damn the Rules, Rocna Inventor doing the NW Passage   
    Just thought that to try and keep the thread on track, and perhaps add a little sanity, here's a reminder of the Kiwis who've completed a successful NW passage:
    2000    Evohe (25m yacht)    Stephen Kafka
    2009    Tyhina (10.4m yacht)    Peter Elliot
    2010    Astral Express (12.5m yacht)    Graeme Kendall single handed over two seasons
    2011    Kotuku (12m yacht)    Ian Douglass
    2012    Tokimata (13m yacht)    Peter Garden
    2017    Larissa (13.7m cutter)    Mark Domney
    2017    Tiama (15.2m skoop)    Hank Haazen

    Just to add Australia have had only 6 successes including 3 by Roger Wallis (Philos in 2012 and again 2014, then in 2017 on Abel Tasman).

    Thus it's a very select group that Pete Evans will soon join.
    In total 123 yachts have made a successful transit, the first of course was the Norweigian 21m yacht Gjøa captained by Roald Amundsen in 1903.  
    About 30 of these had to winter over and so took two seasons.

    The journey is arduous and fraught with danger. And the trip has brought many a dream to a cold and premature end.
    I can appreciate the frustration that Pete Evans will have experienced, no doubt that included all manner of preparation and planning; not to ignore considerable expense.
    We can agree here on this forum, I hope, to at least all wish him a safe and successful voyage.
  21. Upvote
    grantmc reacted to Island Time in What is the latest wisdom on tablet gps?   
    Sorry Steve, I don't agree. Looking at the sea miles completed and the number of accidents, modern shipping is very safe. Much safer than it was in the days of questionable quality paper charts...
    All the gear in the world does not help if it is not on, ignored, or used incorrectly. Complacency and inadequate training are the two main issues. And the skipper is ALLWAYS in charge, electronics and mechanical devices are simply tools to help him do his job. 
  22. Upvote
    grantmc reacted to Fish in Damn the Rules, Rocna Inventor doing the NW Passage   
    Just pick it up by the clean end, you'll be fine.
  23. Upvote
    grantmc reacted to lateral in Damn the Rules, Rocna Inventor doing the NW Passage   
    I am having cognitive problems with this thread; All I can smell is the turd.
  24. Like
    grantmc got a reaction from splat in Damn the Rules, Rocna Inventor doing the NW Passage   
    Kiwi Pete Smith transits the NWP in Kiwi Roa during COVID crisis, ignoring wishes of locals and Canadian government.
    New Zealander sails through Arctic on custom yacht in violation of COVID-19 restrictions
    'I am a yacht, not a bloody cruise ship,' says Peter Smith, who's adamant he will not be turned around
    Is he a Covidiot or just someone upsetting the snow flakes?
  25. Upvote
    grantmc got a reaction from dutyfree in Shane strikes again   
    Interesting observations Wheels.
    Unfortunately the Mental Health Services in NZ are decidedly third world so I wouldn't hold out much hope for Shane there.
    Shane's life is a horror story of abuse, the worst of it experienced under State care.
    Also he's intellectually disabled; in times past he would have been under care of the IHC.
    He may have a metal illness as well, but I don't know.
    He was in State care at about 7 or 8 years of age where he quickly had to learn how to f*ck and suck his caregivers and the older kids.
    And the day he turned 16, like all kids in State care then, he officially became an adult, and so was kicked out with no support.
    He is the way he is largely because of the 'support' he had as a child/teenager in State care and because intellectually he's so challenged.
    Like most abused people, he learnt to say what he thinks people want to hear that will do him the least harm.
    That's a matter of survival not lying.
    And needless to say, (I hope being yachties you're all smart enough to have the insight) he can hardly read, actually I doubt he knows how to tell the time.
    Someone will have had to tell him what the letter from Queenstown Council said as he couldn't possibly have read it himself. 
    Shane is not a joke and I really don't understand why you are all so keen to make fun of him and people like him.
    In the context of sailing he would certainly qualify for the Sailability programnme.
    And like most people with similar pasts, he's hardly going to be inclined to trust Social Workers etc now, after all the crap he's experienced under their help and care in the past.
     
     
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