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chippie

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  1. Upvote
    chippie got a reaction from Deep Purple in Raven 26 Fantail   
    And we had a Piedy.  Twenty boats or more and super competitive.  Spent the first year coming second to last, consistently.  And the Feltex, four days of racing over two weekends.  Buddy magic time for yacht racing!
  2. Upvote
    chippie got a reaction from Dambo in Man overboard question   
    Many, many years ago, we took my mate's uncle out for a sail on the Piedy on a reasonably blustery day.   At one point we crash gybed the Piedy same as always and after a minute or so, realised uncle John, who'd been sitting near the stern, was no longer with us.  He was wearing full wet weather gear and boots, no life jacket.  Hey, it was a Piedy and a long time ago!
    Anyway, we went back to get him, a bit worried he was going to sink out of sight with all that gear on, and found him happily floating on the surface waiting for us.  He'd done a lot of sailing so hadn't panicked.  He'd quickly grabbed the collar of his wet weather jacket so that there was a big bubble of air trapped in the shoulders of his jacket and lifted his boots up so they had trapped air as well and was on his back patiently waiting to be hauled back on board.  Said he'd always wanted to test his theory.  I've been meaning to try it,…. for about thirty five years.
  3. Upvote
    chippie got a reaction from Freedom GBE in Man overboard question   
    Many, many years ago, we took my mate's uncle out for a sail on the Piedy on a reasonably blustery day.   At one point we crash gybed the Piedy same as always and after a minute or so, realised uncle John, who'd been sitting near the stern, was no longer with us.  He was wearing full wet weather gear and boots, no life jacket.  Hey, it was a Piedy and a long time ago!
    Anyway, we went back to get him, a bit worried he was going to sink out of sight with all that gear on, and found him happily floating on the surface waiting for us.  He'd done a lot of sailing so hadn't panicked.  He'd quickly grabbed the collar of his wet weather jacket so that there was a big bubble of air trapped in the shoulders of his jacket and lifted his boots up so they had trapped air as well and was on his back patiently waiting to be hauled back on board.  Said he'd always wanted to test his theory.  I've been meaning to try it,…. for about thirty five years.
  4. Upvote
    chippie got a reaction from WarLord in Man overboard question   
    Many, many years ago, we took my mate's uncle out for a sail on the Piedy on a reasonably blustery day.   At one point we crash gybed the Piedy same as always and after a minute or so, realised uncle John, who'd been sitting near the stern, was no longer with us.  He was wearing full wet weather gear and boots, no life jacket.  Hey, it was a Piedy and a long time ago!
    Anyway, we went back to get him, a bit worried he was going to sink out of sight with all that gear on, and found him happily floating on the surface waiting for us.  He'd done a lot of sailing so hadn't panicked.  He'd quickly grabbed the collar of his wet weather jacket so that there was a big bubble of air trapped in the shoulders of his jacket and lifted his boots up so they had trapped air as well and was on his back patiently waiting to be hauled back on board.  Said he'd always wanted to test his theory.  I've been meaning to try it,…. for about thirty five years.
  5. Downvote
    chippie reacted to Tim C in 2015 Coastal Classic Race Stories   
    Pulse xtc in the PIC Coastal Classic 2015.
     
    We got a good right hand side start, but conservatively didn’t put an extra on, thinking it was going to be a long uphill race, and we didn’t want the sail on the tramp. After North head we were quickly on a powered up two sail reach, Pulse feeling powered up and fast. Ben on the mainsheet, Kushila trimming the jib, and me picking the line between boats. By Tiri passage we felt like we were amongst good company, with lots of big black sails around us.
    Kawau Island went past in two and a half hours; a much better time than we expected with the breeze being slightly more Westerly than forecast.
    But by Omaha Bay the breeze swung around on the nose, and felt shifty and unstable. We tacked in on every shift to stay lift close to the shore. We had three Open 8.5s around us, and Pulse was going well upwind in the light against them, much to every ones surprise!
    Just off Whangarei the breeze went Westerly again, and we were reaching straight into the Northerly chop, crashing through the waves. Eventually we got the screacher up, but no sooner than that happened and it had to come down again.
    It was great to have some nice hot food, and coffees and soups through the night. Have to feel sorry for the boats not taking cookers!
    Nighttime was like a semi blind folded game of chess. Really a beautiful night, with the moon glowing through the Mylar sails, and dolphins occasionally playing in the bow waves.
    Mostly our tactics went well, but one tack into shore at the wrong time, straight into a hole in the breeze, and it looked like the whole local fleet sailed past.
    By dawn the wind had increased, and we were down to staysail and one reef, crashing into the choppy seas. As the light increased, I realised all was not well with our mainsail; the head was not attached to the car. So off Whangamumu down came the mainsail. We realised it was just the webbing, so a quick re lashing and we were back sailing. But not long after it happened again. On dropping the main we could see the alloy top car had broken. Sail slug had to be dropped out of the mast track, the head car exchanged, lashed again to the head ring and re hoisted. A fair loss of sense of humour by the skipper by this time.
    We headed out to sea on port with the rain setting in and the North Island disappearing in the murk, while expecting the strong Northerly change. Not wanting to sheet the main on for fear of damage, we took it gently, but the wind built for us to perhaps 35 knots. So we changed right down to three reefs and storm jib. Tacking back in we still weren’t laying the Brett, and the wind started easing. So the jibs were changed again, and two of the main sail reefs shaken out.
    Past Piercy Island at 1200, which meant two hours to the finish cut off. Sheeted on the tight reach we were only doing five knots, and needed to be doing eight. So I figured the safest place for the damaged head car was at the top of the mast, supported by the halyard. So up went the mainsail to the top of the mast. Past Whale rock and the wind freed and increased. We all were concentrating hard to trim and get the best speed from the boat, as we counted down the time on distance, which was very marginal. But a fast reach saw us close the finish with all of eight minuted to spare. It was great to hear the cheering from the finish boat, and horns sounding ashore!
    After 28 hours of racing, it was great to get out of the wet gear, have a quick drink, and go to bed for a couple of hours!
    Thanks again to my great crew of Kushila and Ben, a splendid effort to get us across the finish line.
    Thanks also to the organisers at NZMYC for putting together a very well organised race. Watching the tracker later was fascinating. Thanks too to PIC insurance, and Musto for the great prizes!
    I wouldn’t have said so on Sunday, but roll on next years race!

  6. Upvote
    chippie got a reaction from smithy09 in This Weekend's Achievements   
    Ahh, that takes me back a few years.  
    Used to own and race a Piedy many years ago when the prizes were always bottles of rum.  After every winter series race we used to tie up at the Akarana jetty and share out the winnings from the previous race.  Quite often there would be so many guys on one poor bugger's boat that the aft end of the cockpit would be awash.  
    After one session, I let go to take the Piedy back to our mooring in Okahu.  We had a nine horse outboard on it and I opened it up to impress the boys with my boat handling skills.  Hit that same patch so hard it fired me from the cockpit through the companionway into the cabin.  They were very …errr…sympathetic.
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