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Island Time

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    Island Time got a reaction from Sabre in Solo Tasman 2010 log   
    I was going through some old logs for my Daughter, who asked about something, and I came across this log of the 2010 Solo Tasman. I thought some here might be interested, but sorry I'm not the writer that our friend who just completed the South Island circumnavigation is!
    The Voyages of SV Island Time
     
    We begin the record of Island Times voyage at Mana Cruising Club, just north of Wellington, New Zealand late in January 2010. 
     
    New Zealand has very strict safety regulations for offshore yachts, and before you can leave you have to have the boat up to a large standard, and have it inspected by an official from Yachting NZ. Most of this document is written at or near the time it occurred, from my (very) basic log.
    It begins as I am preparing Island Time for the Solo Tasman race. Part of the entry requirements for this is a 500Nm passage solo.
    26 Jan 2010;
    Today, the local Cat one inspector came and began the stringent checks required for a NZ registered yacht before it is allowed to leave the country. All is well so far, as I expected. As Island Time has had Cat One before, much of the structural stuff has been checked several times already, so major changes are not required, which is good. All I had to do so far was to replace the mast step screws with 10mm coach screws, and put spectra straps on the engine mounts (so they cannot fall off if inverted and the vulcanised rubber breaks). I've done that.
    The antifoul needs another coat or two, and there is a bit of sanding to do. I also have an oil leak in the back of the engine, between the flywheel casing and the block. The engine has to come out to fix this gasket!! I'll start that tomorrow.
     
    28 Jan 2010;
    Engine out, the oil leak was a missing "O" ring between the front flywheel housing and the block. This was confirmed by Phil, from Strait Marine www.straitmarine.co.nz. The "o" ring was left out by Ovlov Maine in Auckland, when they reconditioned the motor last year. I have put the "O" ring in, and now reinstalled the engine.
     
    30 Jan 2010;
    Hull is sanded, re antifouled, with Vivid White.

    12 Feb 2010;
    Got the Trysail track, and fitted to mast. Seems to work fine. Test rigged both the trysail and the storm jib, both fine. Test rigged the sea anchor, with bridle and float for the snatch block. Hope I don't need any of this stuff!!
     
    20 Feb 2010;
    Got back today from the 500 mile solo voyage, having left on Tues 16th. I just went out to a point 250NM from Mana, about 130 Miles from New Plymouth. The trip out was good, but a bit light, however the last 12 miles were a bit unpleasant, as I had 25Knts on the nose and quite steep seas. Off Stephens Island a car carrier (Morning Mermaid) came up close behind, then turned toward Nelson. Man that is one ugly ship. Then, off cape farewell, in the middle of the night, I was passed by a huge cruise ship, the Queen Victoria. I'd been asleep and the AIS and Radar alarms triggered (They work great!), I had her on both radar and AIS, and she altered course when about 4 miles away so she'd miss me . She looked like a floating city from my perspective!
    About 2:10 am Thursday morning I reached the outer waypoint. It was good to turn around and go downwind - downwind was much more pleasant! However, just before the turnaround, I lost the radar system. That's a problem as the radar (and AIS) keep a watch when I'm asleep! They had proven their worth the previous night, and it means only 20mins sleep at a time until fixed.
    Conditions continued to deteriorate over the next 24 hours, but to begin with it was a good downhill ride, beginning with the kite, then, as the wind strengthened, a fast 2 sail broad reach. The sea state was quite big, as there was an approaching depression further out in the Tasman. The surfing was fun.
    By lunchtime on Thursday morning I had only the deep reefed main and a near storm jib size piece of headsail, and was still managing spurts of 11 or 12 knots. The wind was North to begin with but then went NW (right behind me), about 35 and gusty which is rolly. A few hours later it quickly went around until it was 25 Knots on the nose ( SE) again, but in worse seas.
    The Maritime NZ forecast described it as very rough, and the forecast was for gales in both the Stephens and Cook areas (where I was and where I was going!) I put up with this for few more hours, then, as I could no longer make my course, I bore away into Tasman bay. I hoped to find better conditions there, which I did, eventually, with flatter seas and wind down to about 20-25 knots.
    Then the wind rose again to 30 Knots SE - just the way I wanted to go! Fortunately though, as I got into Tasman Bay further, the wind came around more towards the east, and I managed to follow it around until I made the entrance to French Pass. About 10am on Friday the 19th I motor sailed thru French pass, then sailed again, hard on the wind AGAIN, along the top of the South Island, concluding the 500 Miles just short of Cape Jackson. Being rather tired, I decided to go into Queen Charlotte Sound, and spend the night at Ships Cove. A very nice and peaceful night on the club mooring, and them home today in a Northerly which is much easier than anything from the east!
    Here is a screenshot of the 500 mile qualifier

    21/02/2010; back at Mana
    Today I removed the radar, and found that the scanner unit was not turning. Seems to be a fault in the actuator motor. The head unit is a Kodan, and there is a Kodan agent here in Porirua, so I'll take in the unit tomorrow and see if we can get that sorted.
    The issue I had with the engine not charging I have traced to the loom connector to the engine. Tomorrow I'll remove it and order a new plug and socket, that should sort it out.
     
    22/02/2010;
    Today I sorted the Radar. The Kodan agent was not much help, so I stripped the unit myself. The problem was a bearing in the small stepper motor. I replaced both the bearings, and with Jo's help reinstalled the radar. All working 100% again! $20 repair, so that was good. I've also isolated the electrical problem to the relay socket on the engine loom. One of the connectors on it had been pressed out the back (out of site of course!). I have removed the whole connector frame from the motor so I can see it, and bent the spade terminal retainer back into place, then re-clipped it in. It is a bit dirty, so tomorrows job is to clean it all up and reassemble it. Hopefully that will fix it once and for all. Following that, I'll get on to the SSB/Autopilot interference problem that stops me transmitting on SSB when under autopilot. I have to have this fixed for the Solo Tasman...
     
    4/3/2010;
    Got the plugs sorted, engine now working fine, and I'm happy with the connections now. The SSB interference with the autopilot has turned out to be a bit of a major. I've had a radio tech look at it as well as me, and he's spent most of a day on it as well. The problem is the Rudder Angle indicator moves when the SSB transmits, despite the fact that the rudder is NOT moving.
    Here is what has been done so far.
    Connect shielded dummy load direct to transmitter output. Rudder indicator output is stable, so issue is not within the SSB transceiver.
    Connect shielded dummy load to ATU antenna output. Rudder indicator output is stable, so issue is not within the SSB transceiver or the ATU, or the coax between. Problem source is the Antenna or connections.
    Replace Antenna from ATU out with Shielded coax (shield connected to Counterpoise and batt -), then connected that to Glass Whip Antenna. Problem is present with either Antenna. Problem must be RF feeding back into Autopilot from the antenna.
    Tried RF bypass capacitors on Rudder Feedback cable, + to -, + to Shield, and - to Shield. No help
    Tried rerouting rudder feedback cable as far from radios as possible. No change. Removed Rudder Feedback unit (Simrad RF300) and put it in the oven (connected to Batt -, as a makeshift faraday cage) no change.
    Disconnected Rudder Feedback unit completely, set autopilot to virtual feedback mode. Tests fine!! This means the problem IS in the cable to, or the Rudder Feedback unit itself.
    Sent an email to Navico explaining issue. Awaiting response.
    I've also removed the Autopilot ram and had the seals replaced, ram repainted. A new hose was required for the port side connection, and I've had a spare made.
     
    5/3/2010;
    Ok, I'm getting there with this. Navico have given me the following info;
    Simrad RF300 rudder feedback units were modified in 2004 to pass new RFI requirements. The case and the product codes did not change, but if you have one where the letters between the Part no and Serial no are not FA, and you have an RFI issue, you need to replace it with a new one.
    product code between the p/n and the s/n, i.e. XXXXXXXXFAxxxx.
    This is not in any book or documentation I can find, but this info came direct from the Navico Technical Team leader.
    I have a new one on order..
     
    18/3/2010:
    The SSB problem is solved! The rudder feedback unit was the problem, and following the install of the new one, all is well.
    The rigger has been, and checked over the rig, the boat builder has been and we have reinforced the primary winch bases. I've wired up the VHF for DSC with GPS, replaced the on board printer with a small HP unit (DeskJet 3325), updated the PC with current Anti Virus, patches and versions of everything. Currently have an issue with drivers for the Quatech DSU 200/300 RS422 to USB converter. I may have to roll that driver back tomorrow. I have also changed the blades on the Air-X Marine wind generator with some from www.silentwindgenerator.com . They are blue, and significantly quieter than the original blades.
     
    23/03/2010:
    The Cat one is finished, and the boat is nearly ready, just food and clothes to go. No real issues with the rest of the inspection except the inspector was not really happy with the primary chain plates. He thinks the bottom bolts are too small, and that the load is taken primarily by the lower bolt. I don't agree with that, but he passed the boat on this point due to historical use. The race numbers (8) are on, the new jennaker is here, the electronics are all working. Sounds ready to me. Weather here in Wellington has been crap lately, 50 Knot NW yesterday, 30 gusting 45 in the strait today, forecast for more again tomorrow. I'm planning on leaving for New Plymouth Thursday 25th as I have to be there by the 28th. Weather permitting!
     
    26/03/2010:
    Left Mana with Neil as crew. Forecast was 10 kn NW, but leaving Mana we had 35KN!It slowly moderated as we crossed to the sounds, and then was pretty much gone as we passed through Stephens passage bound for Port Hardy on Durville Island. Spent a very calm night there on the club mooring in the SW corner, with a few Launches from Mana Cruising Club, including my brother's Southern Cross.
     
    27/03/2010:
    Left Port Hardy motoring (no wind!) about 9am for New Plymouth. Breeze gradually increased to 15-18 KN just fwd of the beam. A very pleasant sail , finishing in Port Taranaki about 3am. We picked up one of the race moorings. They are very exposed, with no shelter at all from northerly sectors.
     
    3/4/2010:
    Spent this week doing last minute stuff (nothing critical!). A very rolly anchorage, and not great sleeping aboard, When Jo and family came up to see me off, I went ashore and spent the final two nights at my uncles house with Jo.
     
    4/4/2010: Race day!
    Did customs ashore as a group. Not much wind. Said goodbye to everyone - perhaps for some time, although it looks like we'll have a week at home in 5 or 6 weeks to sort out moving out of the house and the purchase of a rental. Our current house is under a sales contract. The race start was in the fairly narrow harbour entrance. 5 -8 knots almost on the nose. I decided to stay on the mooring, sails up, ready, for as long as possible. This was partially due to the congestion, but also because my mooring was almost right on the starboard layline! Anyway I got the timing a bit wrong and had to do a 360 to waste some time. It worked out pretty well, and I crossed the line 2nd I think. However, 500m out from the breakwater the wind stopped! The course was along the waterfront, outside a coastguard boat, then around a mark on the main city foreshore. Eventually (several hours later, only about a mile covered) the committee shortened the course by moving the mark to the coastguard boat. It was a very slow start! As we got further out the wind came up a bit, and I went from gennaker to spinnaker. Everyone was looking to go south of the rumbline to find the predicted southerly. Start Pic Below

     
     
    5/4/2010:
    Early morning kite problems - I got a really good wrap around the forestay in the sloppy conditions - took an hour and a half to free it and retrieve everything. Trying to make ground west to find the southerly, as are most others.
     
    6/4/2010:
    The southerly came in last night - gusts up to 45 knts, (some competitors reckon they saw 58 overnight, and some then hove to) but, for me, mostly 35 or 40 and gusty.  Was a bit bumpy for a time, but I made good progress. No issues with sea-sickness either - I'm using a scopaderm patch. Running before it with triple reefed main and small jib rolled out. Good speeds under autopilot - 13.7 Knts!! This turned in to a good day, logging 178Nm, which is good for Island Time.
     
    7/4/2010:
    Winds have slowly moderated to 20 - 25 Knts. I've had a long debate with myself about putting a kite back up, and every time I decide I should, the wind goes back up over 25knts. Eventually I did put it up and had a hourglass twist in it - I had to take is straight back down! Lots of work singlehanded!
     
    8/4/2010:
    Wind has dropped right away to 3-4 Knts. I did not have the kite ready from yesterdays problems, but at first light I sorted the kite and hoisted it for a good speed gain. Slowly the wind came further fwd, so I could not hold the kite any more, and I changed to the gennaker. The new gennaker seems great!
    Unfortunately after about an hour the kite halyard broke - inside the mast, jammed in its sheave. I cant fix that at sea unless it's dead flat (unlikely) and it is much easier if there are a couple of people. This could cost me the race!!! No proper downwind sails...
     
    9th/4/2010 Fortunately today has been a 2 sail reach - to tight for downwind sails. A good day calming off in the evening.
     
    10/4/2010; Calming off was an understatement!! Today was very calm, slating sails all day. I managed the worst 24 hour run I have ever had with Island Time - 57 miles! It would have taken little to convince me to chuck it in and motor!! There is another southerly forecast for tomorrow, looks like it might be quite strong. Anything is better than this!!
     
    11/4/2010, pm The southerly is here - came in quite light, supposed to strengthen. I have flown the gennaker from the spare Genoa halyard. it is less than ideal - a shorter hoist, and as the halyard is under the forestay attachment, I have to make sure the sail and halyard do not cross the forestay. Sail set is not great, but better than nothing! it is good to be moving again
     
    12/4/2010: Rob has sent me the other boat positions, man this is a close race. There is less than 20 miles (distance to finish line) between the top 5 boats. Got to keep pushing. I think that some of the skippers have elected to go too far off track looking for wind, and are finding that the distance covered has not been worth it for the speed gains. I still have a shot at this! 25 kn southerly again, moving to directly astern slowly increasing. By 6 pm, 30-35 knots and large (3-4m) steep seas. Wind against the current (1.5 - 2 Knts)
     
    Crap!!! Fell off one of the larger waves (When under AP – I was on the toilet!) and gybed out of control. It ripped the kicker fitting from the mast step, snapping a piece of 10mm stainless. This fitting also holds the forward mainsheet block. It also broke the gooseneck. No full mainsail available now. I feel like that's the end of my race... I have lashed it together as best I can, and hope it holds.
     
    13/4/2010 Fresh winds (30Knts) from directly behind. Against the East Ausy current - steep and sometimes confused seas. I REALLY would not have liked to beat into this wind and sea! Surfing often up to 13 odd knots. Still no one in sight, not sure where they are now, as only one or two have kept the proper radio scheds. Still, they can't be far away.. About 6pm, now close to the end of Morton island, triple reefed main (Still scared of full main with temp repairs), as the wind had moved more toward the west rounding cape Morton. Maybe it will get me to the finish line if I'm careful. Out of the really big seas and most of the current now. Not far to go.
    14/4/2010:
    Crossed the finish line at about 0340hrs this morning, third over the line behind Apriori (Modified Farr 38) and Soothsayer (John Sayer 36). Both these boats are sailed by local Ausy sailors. I'm sure that the local knowledge of the east Ausy current has helped them significantly in the last part of this race. Jenny on Soothsayer had gone in so close to the beach her tracker shows her on shore! (Rob sent me and email with positions from the web - thanks Rob!)
     
    15/4/2010:
    In Mooloolaba marina cleaning up. Thoughts on the race;
    Island Girl (Farr 1220, v. similar to Island Time) was effectively removed from the race a day or two from the end when she broke an intermediate stay. She was lucky not to lose the rig. All the boats have come in with some type of damage. It is interesting that the two boats in front of me are stripped out racers, so I feel I've done ok. The conditions have been typical Tasman - too much wind or not enough. I should have done more research on the East Ausy Current. Despite the breakages it was really that that cost me the race - I lost 30 miles or more to soothsayer on the last day. I also note that my average speed was slower than most of the others, yet I crossed the line third - so my route planning was better than theirs. It's all a learning curve! I could have pushed harder, but you also have to get to the end. My Autopilot is now excellent, and the electronics (especially the radar, AIS, and wireless remote system) allowed me to get better sleep than most - Although none at all for the last 30 odd hours.
     
  2. Like
    Island Time got a reaction from CarpeDiem in Solo Tasman 2010 log   
    I was going through some old logs for my Daughter, who asked about something, and I came across this log of the 2010 Solo Tasman. I thought some here might be interested, but sorry I'm not the writer that our friend who just completed the South Island circumnavigation is!
    The Voyages of SV Island Time
     
    We begin the record of Island Times voyage at Mana Cruising Club, just north of Wellington, New Zealand late in January 2010. 
     
    New Zealand has very strict safety regulations for offshore yachts, and before you can leave you have to have the boat up to a large standard, and have it inspected by an official from Yachting NZ. Most of this document is written at or near the time it occurred, from my (very) basic log.
    It begins as I am preparing Island Time for the Solo Tasman race. Part of the entry requirements for this is a 500Nm passage solo.
    26 Jan 2010;
    Today, the local Cat one inspector came and began the stringent checks required for a NZ registered yacht before it is allowed to leave the country. All is well so far, as I expected. As Island Time has had Cat One before, much of the structural stuff has been checked several times already, so major changes are not required, which is good. All I had to do so far was to replace the mast step screws with 10mm coach screws, and put spectra straps on the engine mounts (so they cannot fall off if inverted and the vulcanised rubber breaks). I've done that.
    The antifoul needs another coat or two, and there is a bit of sanding to do. I also have an oil leak in the back of the engine, between the flywheel casing and the block. The engine has to come out to fix this gasket!! I'll start that tomorrow.
     
    28 Jan 2010;
    Engine out, the oil leak was a missing "O" ring between the front flywheel housing and the block. This was confirmed by Phil, from Strait Marine www.straitmarine.co.nz. The "o" ring was left out by Ovlov Maine in Auckland, when they reconditioned the motor last year. I have put the "O" ring in, and now reinstalled the engine.
     
    30 Jan 2010;
    Hull is sanded, re antifouled, with Vivid White.

    12 Feb 2010;
    Got the Trysail track, and fitted to mast. Seems to work fine. Test rigged both the trysail and the storm jib, both fine. Test rigged the sea anchor, with bridle and float for the snatch block. Hope I don't need any of this stuff!!
     
    20 Feb 2010;
    Got back today from the 500 mile solo voyage, having left on Tues 16th. I just went out to a point 250NM from Mana, about 130 Miles from New Plymouth. The trip out was good, but a bit light, however the last 12 miles were a bit unpleasant, as I had 25Knts on the nose and quite steep seas. Off Stephens Island a car carrier (Morning Mermaid) came up close behind, then turned toward Nelson. Man that is one ugly ship. Then, off cape farewell, in the middle of the night, I was passed by a huge cruise ship, the Queen Victoria. I'd been asleep and the AIS and Radar alarms triggered (They work great!), I had her on both radar and AIS, and she altered course when about 4 miles away so she'd miss me . She looked like a floating city from my perspective!
    About 2:10 am Thursday morning I reached the outer waypoint. It was good to turn around and go downwind - downwind was much more pleasant! However, just before the turnaround, I lost the radar system. That's a problem as the radar (and AIS) keep a watch when I'm asleep! They had proven their worth the previous night, and it means only 20mins sleep at a time until fixed.
    Conditions continued to deteriorate over the next 24 hours, but to begin with it was a good downhill ride, beginning with the kite, then, as the wind strengthened, a fast 2 sail broad reach. The sea state was quite big, as there was an approaching depression further out in the Tasman. The surfing was fun.
    By lunchtime on Thursday morning I had only the deep reefed main and a near storm jib size piece of headsail, and was still managing spurts of 11 or 12 knots. The wind was North to begin with but then went NW (right behind me), about 35 and gusty which is rolly. A few hours later it quickly went around until it was 25 Knots on the nose ( SE) again, but in worse seas.
    The Maritime NZ forecast described it as very rough, and the forecast was for gales in both the Stephens and Cook areas (where I was and where I was going!) I put up with this for few more hours, then, as I could no longer make my course, I bore away into Tasman bay. I hoped to find better conditions there, which I did, eventually, with flatter seas and wind down to about 20-25 knots.
    Then the wind rose again to 30 Knots SE - just the way I wanted to go! Fortunately though, as I got into Tasman Bay further, the wind came around more towards the east, and I managed to follow it around until I made the entrance to French Pass. About 10am on Friday the 19th I motor sailed thru French pass, then sailed again, hard on the wind AGAIN, along the top of the South Island, concluding the 500 Miles just short of Cape Jackson. Being rather tired, I decided to go into Queen Charlotte Sound, and spend the night at Ships Cove. A very nice and peaceful night on the club mooring, and them home today in a Northerly which is much easier than anything from the east!
    Here is a screenshot of the 500 mile qualifier

    21/02/2010; back at Mana
    Today I removed the radar, and found that the scanner unit was not turning. Seems to be a fault in the actuator motor. The head unit is a Kodan, and there is a Kodan agent here in Porirua, so I'll take in the unit tomorrow and see if we can get that sorted.
    The issue I had with the engine not charging I have traced to the loom connector to the engine. Tomorrow I'll remove it and order a new plug and socket, that should sort it out.
     
    22/02/2010;
    Today I sorted the Radar. The Kodan agent was not much help, so I stripped the unit myself. The problem was a bearing in the small stepper motor. I replaced both the bearings, and with Jo's help reinstalled the radar. All working 100% again! $20 repair, so that was good. I've also isolated the electrical problem to the relay socket on the engine loom. One of the connectors on it had been pressed out the back (out of site of course!). I have removed the whole connector frame from the motor so I can see it, and bent the spade terminal retainer back into place, then re-clipped it in. It is a bit dirty, so tomorrows job is to clean it all up and reassemble it. Hopefully that will fix it once and for all. Following that, I'll get on to the SSB/Autopilot interference problem that stops me transmitting on SSB when under autopilot. I have to have this fixed for the Solo Tasman...
     
    4/3/2010;
    Got the plugs sorted, engine now working fine, and I'm happy with the connections now. The SSB interference with the autopilot has turned out to be a bit of a major. I've had a radio tech look at it as well as me, and he's spent most of a day on it as well. The problem is the Rudder Angle indicator moves when the SSB transmits, despite the fact that the rudder is NOT moving.
    Here is what has been done so far.
    Connect shielded dummy load direct to transmitter output. Rudder indicator output is stable, so issue is not within the SSB transceiver.
    Connect shielded dummy load to ATU antenna output. Rudder indicator output is stable, so issue is not within the SSB transceiver or the ATU, or the coax between. Problem source is the Antenna or connections.
    Replace Antenna from ATU out with Shielded coax (shield connected to Counterpoise and batt -), then connected that to Glass Whip Antenna. Problem is present with either Antenna. Problem must be RF feeding back into Autopilot from the antenna.
    Tried RF bypass capacitors on Rudder Feedback cable, + to -, + to Shield, and - to Shield. No help
    Tried rerouting rudder feedback cable as far from radios as possible. No change. Removed Rudder Feedback unit (Simrad RF300) and put it in the oven (connected to Batt -, as a makeshift faraday cage) no change.
    Disconnected Rudder Feedback unit completely, set autopilot to virtual feedback mode. Tests fine!! This means the problem IS in the cable to, or the Rudder Feedback unit itself.
    Sent an email to Navico explaining issue. Awaiting response.
    I've also removed the Autopilot ram and had the seals replaced, ram repainted. A new hose was required for the port side connection, and I've had a spare made.
     
    5/3/2010;
    Ok, I'm getting there with this. Navico have given me the following info;
    Simrad RF300 rudder feedback units were modified in 2004 to pass new RFI requirements. The case and the product codes did not change, but if you have one where the letters between the Part no and Serial no are not FA, and you have an RFI issue, you need to replace it with a new one.
    product code between the p/n and the s/n, i.e. XXXXXXXXFAxxxx.
    This is not in any book or documentation I can find, but this info came direct from the Navico Technical Team leader.
    I have a new one on order..
     
    18/3/2010:
    The SSB problem is solved! The rudder feedback unit was the problem, and following the install of the new one, all is well.
    The rigger has been, and checked over the rig, the boat builder has been and we have reinforced the primary winch bases. I've wired up the VHF for DSC with GPS, replaced the on board printer with a small HP unit (DeskJet 3325), updated the PC with current Anti Virus, patches and versions of everything. Currently have an issue with drivers for the Quatech DSU 200/300 RS422 to USB converter. I may have to roll that driver back tomorrow. I have also changed the blades on the Air-X Marine wind generator with some from www.silentwindgenerator.com . They are blue, and significantly quieter than the original blades.
     
    23/03/2010:
    The Cat one is finished, and the boat is nearly ready, just food and clothes to go. No real issues with the rest of the inspection except the inspector was not really happy with the primary chain plates. He thinks the bottom bolts are too small, and that the load is taken primarily by the lower bolt. I don't agree with that, but he passed the boat on this point due to historical use. The race numbers (8) are on, the new jennaker is here, the electronics are all working. Sounds ready to me. Weather here in Wellington has been crap lately, 50 Knot NW yesterday, 30 gusting 45 in the strait today, forecast for more again tomorrow. I'm planning on leaving for New Plymouth Thursday 25th as I have to be there by the 28th. Weather permitting!
     
    26/03/2010:
    Left Mana with Neil as crew. Forecast was 10 kn NW, but leaving Mana we had 35KN!It slowly moderated as we crossed to the sounds, and then was pretty much gone as we passed through Stephens passage bound for Port Hardy on Durville Island. Spent a very calm night there on the club mooring in the SW corner, with a few Launches from Mana Cruising Club, including my brother's Southern Cross.
     
    27/03/2010:
    Left Port Hardy motoring (no wind!) about 9am for New Plymouth. Breeze gradually increased to 15-18 KN just fwd of the beam. A very pleasant sail , finishing in Port Taranaki about 3am. We picked up one of the race moorings. They are very exposed, with no shelter at all from northerly sectors.
     
    3/4/2010:
    Spent this week doing last minute stuff (nothing critical!). A very rolly anchorage, and not great sleeping aboard, When Jo and family came up to see me off, I went ashore and spent the final two nights at my uncles house with Jo.
     
    4/4/2010: Race day!
    Did customs ashore as a group. Not much wind. Said goodbye to everyone - perhaps for some time, although it looks like we'll have a week at home in 5 or 6 weeks to sort out moving out of the house and the purchase of a rental. Our current house is under a sales contract. The race start was in the fairly narrow harbour entrance. 5 -8 knots almost on the nose. I decided to stay on the mooring, sails up, ready, for as long as possible. This was partially due to the congestion, but also because my mooring was almost right on the starboard layline! Anyway I got the timing a bit wrong and had to do a 360 to waste some time. It worked out pretty well, and I crossed the line 2nd I think. However, 500m out from the breakwater the wind stopped! The course was along the waterfront, outside a coastguard boat, then around a mark on the main city foreshore. Eventually (several hours later, only about a mile covered) the committee shortened the course by moving the mark to the coastguard boat. It was a very slow start! As we got further out the wind came up a bit, and I went from gennaker to spinnaker. Everyone was looking to go south of the rumbline to find the predicted southerly. Start Pic Below

     
     
    5/4/2010:
    Early morning kite problems - I got a really good wrap around the forestay in the sloppy conditions - took an hour and a half to free it and retrieve everything. Trying to make ground west to find the southerly, as are most others.
     
    6/4/2010:
    The southerly came in last night - gusts up to 45 knts, (some competitors reckon they saw 58 overnight, and some then hove to) but, for me, mostly 35 or 40 and gusty.  Was a bit bumpy for a time, but I made good progress. No issues with sea-sickness either - I'm using a scopaderm patch. Running before it with triple reefed main and small jib rolled out. Good speeds under autopilot - 13.7 Knts!! This turned in to a good day, logging 178Nm, which is good for Island Time.
     
    7/4/2010:
    Winds have slowly moderated to 20 - 25 Knts. I've had a long debate with myself about putting a kite back up, and every time I decide I should, the wind goes back up over 25knts. Eventually I did put it up and had a hourglass twist in it - I had to take is straight back down! Lots of work singlehanded!
     
    8/4/2010:
    Wind has dropped right away to 3-4 Knts. I did not have the kite ready from yesterdays problems, but at first light I sorted the kite and hoisted it for a good speed gain. Slowly the wind came further fwd, so I could not hold the kite any more, and I changed to the gennaker. The new gennaker seems great!
    Unfortunately after about an hour the kite halyard broke - inside the mast, jammed in its sheave. I cant fix that at sea unless it's dead flat (unlikely) and it is much easier if there are a couple of people. This could cost me the race!!! No proper downwind sails...
     
    9th/4/2010 Fortunately today has been a 2 sail reach - to tight for downwind sails. A good day calming off in the evening.
     
    10/4/2010; Calming off was an understatement!! Today was very calm, slating sails all day. I managed the worst 24 hour run I have ever had with Island Time - 57 miles! It would have taken little to convince me to chuck it in and motor!! There is another southerly forecast for tomorrow, looks like it might be quite strong. Anything is better than this!!
     
    11/4/2010, pm The southerly is here - came in quite light, supposed to strengthen. I have flown the gennaker from the spare Genoa halyard. it is less than ideal - a shorter hoist, and as the halyard is under the forestay attachment, I have to make sure the sail and halyard do not cross the forestay. Sail set is not great, but better than nothing! it is good to be moving again
     
    12/4/2010: Rob has sent me the other boat positions, man this is a close race. There is less than 20 miles (distance to finish line) between the top 5 boats. Got to keep pushing. I think that some of the skippers have elected to go too far off track looking for wind, and are finding that the distance covered has not been worth it for the speed gains. I still have a shot at this! 25 kn southerly again, moving to directly astern slowly increasing. By 6 pm, 30-35 knots and large (3-4m) steep seas. Wind against the current (1.5 - 2 Knts)
     
    Crap!!! Fell off one of the larger waves (When under AP – I was on the toilet!) and gybed out of control. It ripped the kicker fitting from the mast step, snapping a piece of 10mm stainless. This fitting also holds the forward mainsheet block. It also broke the gooseneck. No full mainsail available now. I feel like that's the end of my race... I have lashed it together as best I can, and hope it holds.
     
    13/4/2010 Fresh winds (30Knts) from directly behind. Against the East Ausy current - steep and sometimes confused seas. I REALLY would not have liked to beat into this wind and sea! Surfing often up to 13 odd knots. Still no one in sight, not sure where they are now, as only one or two have kept the proper radio scheds. Still, they can't be far away.. About 6pm, now close to the end of Morton island, triple reefed main (Still scared of full main with temp repairs), as the wind had moved more toward the west rounding cape Morton. Maybe it will get me to the finish line if I'm careful. Out of the really big seas and most of the current now. Not far to go.
    14/4/2010:
    Crossed the finish line at about 0340hrs this morning, third over the line behind Apriori (Modified Farr 38) and Soothsayer (John Sayer 36). Both these boats are sailed by local Ausy sailors. I'm sure that the local knowledge of the east Ausy current has helped them significantly in the last part of this race. Jenny on Soothsayer had gone in so close to the beach her tracker shows her on shore! (Rob sent me and email with positions from the web - thanks Rob!)
     
    15/4/2010:
    In Mooloolaba marina cleaning up. Thoughts on the race;
    Island Girl (Farr 1220, v. similar to Island Time) was effectively removed from the race a day or two from the end when she broke an intermediate stay. She was lucky not to lose the rig. All the boats have come in with some type of damage. It is interesting that the two boats in front of me are stripped out racers, so I feel I've done ok. The conditions have been typical Tasman - too much wind or not enough. I should have done more research on the East Ausy Current. Despite the breakages it was really that that cost me the race - I lost 30 miles or more to soothsayer on the last day. I also note that my average speed was slower than most of the others, yet I crossed the line third - so my route planning was better than theirs. It's all a learning curve! I could have pushed harder, but you also have to get to the end. My Autopilot is now excellent, and the electronics (especially the radar, AIS, and wireless remote system) allowed me to get better sleep than most - Although none at all for the last 30 odd hours.
     
  3. Like
    Island Time got a reaction from lateral in Solo Tasman 2010 log   
    I was going through some old logs for my Daughter, who asked about something, and I came across this log of the 2010 Solo Tasman. I thought some here might be interested, but sorry I'm not the writer that our friend who just completed the South Island circumnavigation is!
    The Voyages of SV Island Time
     
    We begin the record of Island Times voyage at Mana Cruising Club, just north of Wellington, New Zealand late in January 2010. 
     
    New Zealand has very strict safety regulations for offshore yachts, and before you can leave you have to have the boat up to a large standard, and have it inspected by an official from Yachting NZ. Most of this document is written at or near the time it occurred, from my (very) basic log.
    It begins as I am preparing Island Time for the Solo Tasman race. Part of the entry requirements for this is a 500Nm passage solo.
    26 Jan 2010;
    Today, the local Cat one inspector came and began the stringent checks required for a NZ registered yacht before it is allowed to leave the country. All is well so far, as I expected. As Island Time has had Cat One before, much of the structural stuff has been checked several times already, so major changes are not required, which is good. All I had to do so far was to replace the mast step screws with 10mm coach screws, and put spectra straps on the engine mounts (so they cannot fall off if inverted and the vulcanised rubber breaks). I've done that.
    The antifoul needs another coat or two, and there is a bit of sanding to do. I also have an oil leak in the back of the engine, between the flywheel casing and the block. The engine has to come out to fix this gasket!! I'll start that tomorrow.
     
    28 Jan 2010;
    Engine out, the oil leak was a missing "O" ring between the front flywheel housing and the block. This was confirmed by Phil, from Strait Marine www.straitmarine.co.nz. The "o" ring was left out by Ovlov Maine in Auckland, when they reconditioned the motor last year. I have put the "O" ring in, and now reinstalled the engine.
     
    30 Jan 2010;
    Hull is sanded, re antifouled, with Vivid White.

    12 Feb 2010;
    Got the Trysail track, and fitted to mast. Seems to work fine. Test rigged both the trysail and the storm jib, both fine. Test rigged the sea anchor, with bridle and float for the snatch block. Hope I don't need any of this stuff!!
     
    20 Feb 2010;
    Got back today from the 500 mile solo voyage, having left on Tues 16th. I just went out to a point 250NM from Mana, about 130 Miles from New Plymouth. The trip out was good, but a bit light, however the last 12 miles were a bit unpleasant, as I had 25Knts on the nose and quite steep seas. Off Stephens Island a car carrier (Morning Mermaid) came up close behind, then turned toward Nelson. Man that is one ugly ship. Then, off cape farewell, in the middle of the night, I was passed by a huge cruise ship, the Queen Victoria. I'd been asleep and the AIS and Radar alarms triggered (They work great!), I had her on both radar and AIS, and she altered course when about 4 miles away so she'd miss me . She looked like a floating city from my perspective!
    About 2:10 am Thursday morning I reached the outer waypoint. It was good to turn around and go downwind - downwind was much more pleasant! However, just before the turnaround, I lost the radar system. That's a problem as the radar (and AIS) keep a watch when I'm asleep! They had proven their worth the previous night, and it means only 20mins sleep at a time until fixed.
    Conditions continued to deteriorate over the next 24 hours, but to begin with it was a good downhill ride, beginning with the kite, then, as the wind strengthened, a fast 2 sail broad reach. The sea state was quite big, as there was an approaching depression further out in the Tasman. The surfing was fun.
    By lunchtime on Thursday morning I had only the deep reefed main and a near storm jib size piece of headsail, and was still managing spurts of 11 or 12 knots. The wind was North to begin with but then went NW (right behind me), about 35 and gusty which is rolly. A few hours later it quickly went around until it was 25 Knots on the nose ( SE) again, but in worse seas.
    The Maritime NZ forecast described it as very rough, and the forecast was for gales in both the Stephens and Cook areas (where I was and where I was going!) I put up with this for few more hours, then, as I could no longer make my course, I bore away into Tasman bay. I hoped to find better conditions there, which I did, eventually, with flatter seas and wind down to about 20-25 knots.
    Then the wind rose again to 30 Knots SE - just the way I wanted to go! Fortunately though, as I got into Tasman Bay further, the wind came around more towards the east, and I managed to follow it around until I made the entrance to French Pass. About 10am on Friday the 19th I motor sailed thru French pass, then sailed again, hard on the wind AGAIN, along the top of the South Island, concluding the 500 Miles just short of Cape Jackson. Being rather tired, I decided to go into Queen Charlotte Sound, and spend the night at Ships Cove. A very nice and peaceful night on the club mooring, and them home today in a Northerly which is much easier than anything from the east!
    Here is a screenshot of the 500 mile qualifier

    21/02/2010; back at Mana
    Today I removed the radar, and found that the scanner unit was not turning. Seems to be a fault in the actuator motor. The head unit is a Kodan, and there is a Kodan agent here in Porirua, so I'll take in the unit tomorrow and see if we can get that sorted.
    The issue I had with the engine not charging I have traced to the loom connector to the engine. Tomorrow I'll remove it and order a new plug and socket, that should sort it out.
     
    22/02/2010;
    Today I sorted the Radar. The Kodan agent was not much help, so I stripped the unit myself. The problem was a bearing in the small stepper motor. I replaced both the bearings, and with Jo's help reinstalled the radar. All working 100% again! $20 repair, so that was good. I've also isolated the electrical problem to the relay socket on the engine loom. One of the connectors on it had been pressed out the back (out of site of course!). I have removed the whole connector frame from the motor so I can see it, and bent the spade terminal retainer back into place, then re-clipped it in. It is a bit dirty, so tomorrows job is to clean it all up and reassemble it. Hopefully that will fix it once and for all. Following that, I'll get on to the SSB/Autopilot interference problem that stops me transmitting on SSB when under autopilot. I have to have this fixed for the Solo Tasman...
     
    4/3/2010;
    Got the plugs sorted, engine now working fine, and I'm happy with the connections now. The SSB interference with the autopilot has turned out to be a bit of a major. I've had a radio tech look at it as well as me, and he's spent most of a day on it as well. The problem is the Rudder Angle indicator moves when the SSB transmits, despite the fact that the rudder is NOT moving.
    Here is what has been done so far.
    Connect shielded dummy load direct to transmitter output. Rudder indicator output is stable, so issue is not within the SSB transceiver.
    Connect shielded dummy load to ATU antenna output. Rudder indicator output is stable, so issue is not within the SSB transceiver or the ATU, or the coax between. Problem source is the Antenna or connections.
    Replace Antenna from ATU out with Shielded coax (shield connected to Counterpoise and batt -), then connected that to Glass Whip Antenna. Problem is present with either Antenna. Problem must be RF feeding back into Autopilot from the antenna.
    Tried RF bypass capacitors on Rudder Feedback cable, + to -, + to Shield, and - to Shield. No help
    Tried rerouting rudder feedback cable as far from radios as possible. No change. Removed Rudder Feedback unit (Simrad RF300) and put it in the oven (connected to Batt -, as a makeshift faraday cage) no change.
    Disconnected Rudder Feedback unit completely, set autopilot to virtual feedback mode. Tests fine!! This means the problem IS in the cable to, or the Rudder Feedback unit itself.
    Sent an email to Navico explaining issue. Awaiting response.
    I've also removed the Autopilot ram and had the seals replaced, ram repainted. A new hose was required for the port side connection, and I've had a spare made.
     
    5/3/2010;
    Ok, I'm getting there with this. Navico have given me the following info;
    Simrad RF300 rudder feedback units were modified in 2004 to pass new RFI requirements. The case and the product codes did not change, but if you have one where the letters between the Part no and Serial no are not FA, and you have an RFI issue, you need to replace it with a new one.
    product code between the p/n and the s/n, i.e. XXXXXXXXFAxxxx.
    This is not in any book or documentation I can find, but this info came direct from the Navico Technical Team leader.
    I have a new one on order..
     
    18/3/2010:
    The SSB problem is solved! The rudder feedback unit was the problem, and following the install of the new one, all is well.
    The rigger has been, and checked over the rig, the boat builder has been and we have reinforced the primary winch bases. I've wired up the VHF for DSC with GPS, replaced the on board printer with a small HP unit (DeskJet 3325), updated the PC with current Anti Virus, patches and versions of everything. Currently have an issue with drivers for the Quatech DSU 200/300 RS422 to USB converter. I may have to roll that driver back tomorrow. I have also changed the blades on the Air-X Marine wind generator with some from www.silentwindgenerator.com . They are blue, and significantly quieter than the original blades.
     
    23/03/2010:
    The Cat one is finished, and the boat is nearly ready, just food and clothes to go. No real issues with the rest of the inspection except the inspector was not really happy with the primary chain plates. He thinks the bottom bolts are too small, and that the load is taken primarily by the lower bolt. I don't agree with that, but he passed the boat on this point due to historical use. The race numbers (8) are on, the new jennaker is here, the electronics are all working. Sounds ready to me. Weather here in Wellington has been crap lately, 50 Knot NW yesterday, 30 gusting 45 in the strait today, forecast for more again tomorrow. I'm planning on leaving for New Plymouth Thursday 25th as I have to be there by the 28th. Weather permitting!
     
    26/03/2010:
    Left Mana with Neil as crew. Forecast was 10 kn NW, but leaving Mana we had 35KN!It slowly moderated as we crossed to the sounds, and then was pretty much gone as we passed through Stephens passage bound for Port Hardy on Durville Island. Spent a very calm night there on the club mooring in the SW corner, with a few Launches from Mana Cruising Club, including my brother's Southern Cross.
     
    27/03/2010:
    Left Port Hardy motoring (no wind!) about 9am for New Plymouth. Breeze gradually increased to 15-18 KN just fwd of the beam. A very pleasant sail , finishing in Port Taranaki about 3am. We picked up one of the race moorings. They are very exposed, with no shelter at all from northerly sectors.
     
    3/4/2010:
    Spent this week doing last minute stuff (nothing critical!). A very rolly anchorage, and not great sleeping aboard, When Jo and family came up to see me off, I went ashore and spent the final two nights at my uncles house with Jo.
     
    4/4/2010: Race day!
    Did customs ashore as a group. Not much wind. Said goodbye to everyone - perhaps for some time, although it looks like we'll have a week at home in 5 or 6 weeks to sort out moving out of the house and the purchase of a rental. Our current house is under a sales contract. The race start was in the fairly narrow harbour entrance. 5 -8 knots almost on the nose. I decided to stay on the mooring, sails up, ready, for as long as possible. This was partially due to the congestion, but also because my mooring was almost right on the starboard layline! Anyway I got the timing a bit wrong and had to do a 360 to waste some time. It worked out pretty well, and I crossed the line 2nd I think. However, 500m out from the breakwater the wind stopped! The course was along the waterfront, outside a coastguard boat, then around a mark on the main city foreshore. Eventually (several hours later, only about a mile covered) the committee shortened the course by moving the mark to the coastguard boat. It was a very slow start! As we got further out the wind came up a bit, and I went from gennaker to spinnaker. Everyone was looking to go south of the rumbline to find the predicted southerly. Start Pic Below

     
     
    5/4/2010:
    Early morning kite problems - I got a really good wrap around the forestay in the sloppy conditions - took an hour and a half to free it and retrieve everything. Trying to make ground west to find the southerly, as are most others.
     
    6/4/2010:
    The southerly came in last night - gusts up to 45 knts, (some competitors reckon they saw 58 overnight, and some then hove to) but, for me, mostly 35 or 40 and gusty.  Was a bit bumpy for a time, but I made good progress. No issues with sea-sickness either - I'm using a scopaderm patch. Running before it with triple reefed main and small jib rolled out. Good speeds under autopilot - 13.7 Knts!! This turned in to a good day, logging 178Nm, which is good for Island Time.
     
    7/4/2010:
    Winds have slowly moderated to 20 - 25 Knts. I've had a long debate with myself about putting a kite back up, and every time I decide I should, the wind goes back up over 25knts. Eventually I did put it up and had a hourglass twist in it - I had to take is straight back down! Lots of work singlehanded!
     
    8/4/2010:
    Wind has dropped right away to 3-4 Knts. I did not have the kite ready from yesterdays problems, but at first light I sorted the kite and hoisted it for a good speed gain. Slowly the wind came further fwd, so I could not hold the kite any more, and I changed to the gennaker. The new gennaker seems great!
    Unfortunately after about an hour the kite halyard broke - inside the mast, jammed in its sheave. I cant fix that at sea unless it's dead flat (unlikely) and it is much easier if there are a couple of people. This could cost me the race!!! No proper downwind sails...
     
    9th/4/2010 Fortunately today has been a 2 sail reach - to tight for downwind sails. A good day calming off in the evening.
     
    10/4/2010; Calming off was an understatement!! Today was very calm, slating sails all day. I managed the worst 24 hour run I have ever had with Island Time - 57 miles! It would have taken little to convince me to chuck it in and motor!! There is another southerly forecast for tomorrow, looks like it might be quite strong. Anything is better than this!!
     
    11/4/2010, pm The southerly is here - came in quite light, supposed to strengthen. I have flown the gennaker from the spare Genoa halyard. it is less than ideal - a shorter hoist, and as the halyard is under the forestay attachment, I have to make sure the sail and halyard do not cross the forestay. Sail set is not great, but better than nothing! it is good to be moving again
     
    12/4/2010: Rob has sent me the other boat positions, man this is a close race. There is less than 20 miles (distance to finish line) between the top 5 boats. Got to keep pushing. I think that some of the skippers have elected to go too far off track looking for wind, and are finding that the distance covered has not been worth it for the speed gains. I still have a shot at this! 25 kn southerly again, moving to directly astern slowly increasing. By 6 pm, 30-35 knots and large (3-4m) steep seas. Wind against the current (1.5 - 2 Knts)
     
    Crap!!! Fell off one of the larger waves (When under AP – I was on the toilet!) and gybed out of control. It ripped the kicker fitting from the mast step, snapping a piece of 10mm stainless. This fitting also holds the forward mainsheet block. It also broke the gooseneck. No full mainsail available now. I feel like that's the end of my race... I have lashed it together as best I can, and hope it holds.
     
    13/4/2010 Fresh winds (30Knts) from directly behind. Against the East Ausy current - steep and sometimes confused seas. I REALLY would not have liked to beat into this wind and sea! Surfing often up to 13 odd knots. Still no one in sight, not sure where they are now, as only one or two have kept the proper radio scheds. Still, they can't be far away.. About 6pm, now close to the end of Morton island, triple reefed main (Still scared of full main with temp repairs), as the wind had moved more toward the west rounding cape Morton. Maybe it will get me to the finish line if I'm careful. Out of the really big seas and most of the current now. Not far to go.
    14/4/2010:
    Crossed the finish line at about 0340hrs this morning, third over the line behind Apriori (Modified Farr 38) and Soothsayer (John Sayer 36). Both these boats are sailed by local Ausy sailors. I'm sure that the local knowledge of the east Ausy current has helped them significantly in the last part of this race. Jenny on Soothsayer had gone in so close to the beach her tracker shows her on shore! (Rob sent me and email with positions from the web - thanks Rob!)
     
    15/4/2010:
    In Mooloolaba marina cleaning up. Thoughts on the race;
    Island Girl (Farr 1220, v. similar to Island Time) was effectively removed from the race a day or two from the end when she broke an intermediate stay. She was lucky not to lose the rig. All the boats have come in with some type of damage. It is interesting that the two boats in front of me are stripped out racers, so I feel I've done ok. The conditions have been typical Tasman - too much wind or not enough. I should have done more research on the East Ausy Current. Despite the breakages it was really that that cost me the race - I lost 30 miles or more to soothsayer on the last day. I also note that my average speed was slower than most of the others, yet I crossed the line third - so my route planning was better than theirs. It's all a learning curve! I could have pushed harder, but you also have to get to the end. My Autopilot is now excellent, and the electronics (especially the radar, AIS, and wireless remote system) allowed me to get better sleep than most - Although none at all for the last 30 odd hours.
     
  4. Upvote
    Island Time got a reaction from Clipper in Trump has Covid   
    This is reality, not the thought police. People should be judged on their actions. Some deserve respect, some don't. Some, are simply vile and are not worth the oxygen they consume. IMO.
  5. Like
    Island Time reacted to Fish in Trump has Covid   
    You do understand that Trump assassinated a guy, as in with a bomb, blew him and several others up. In a country that had nothing to do with either trump or the assassinated guy. As far as anyone can tell, this was entirely to make Trumps cock look bigger.
    It is beyond me how you can relate that to our PM. I understand she gave a reporter a sharp look once... You do seem to have some kind of unhealthy fixation on Jacinda though. 
  6. Upvote
    Island Time got a reaction from aardvarkash10 in Trump has Covid   
    Well, I'd not agree with that, the the United States is a Constitutional FederalRepublic. It does have democratic tendencies, I agree, but see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democracy_Index
    The us rates in the 20's below South Korea for example.
    I expect it to fall still further if Trump wins again...
  7. Upvote
    Island Time got a reaction from Sabre in Seafaring nation?   
    Totally different argument, sorry. General tourists (by plane) pose a huge and difficult to control (expensive to quarantine) risk to NZ.
    The cruising sailboats, on the other hand, are easy to quarantine (anchor out, remove dinghy, or behind barriers on wharf/marina) for the little time they have left in quarantine. Then take the economic benefit that they can provide. 
    On a daily basis, the average cruiser will spend less than the average tourist, but as they are here longer, and often refit, it adds up...
    Little risk, with good benefits, we should do it. IMO.
  8. Upvote
    Island Time got a reaction from Jon in Seafaring nation?   
    Totally different argument, sorry. General tourists (by plane) pose a huge and difficult to control (expensive to quarantine) risk to NZ.
    The cruising sailboats, on the other hand, are easy to quarantine (anchor out, remove dinghy, or behind barriers on wharf/marina) for the little time they have left in quarantine. Then take the economic benefit that they can provide. 
    On a daily basis, the average cruiser will spend less than the average tourist, but as they are here longer, and often refit, it adds up...
    Little risk, with good benefits, we should do it. IMO.
  9. Upvote
    Island Time reacted to aardvarkash10 in This Weekend's Achievements   
    this weekend - Wairoa (Clevedon) River to Rotoroa Home Bay on Friday, pleasant day strolling around the island (water's still a bit cool for me for swimming) pre-evening drinks watching the sun go down and the moon come up in the company of about 12 other boats of various types.
    Saturday Rotoroa to Rakino - I've lived in Auckland since 1989 and never been to either.  Slow going motoring against the tide up the Waiheke Channel but finally picked up some wind off Onetangi and circumnavigated Rakino before deciding that Home Bay must be good since they named it twice and everything else was like apartment living - Woody Bay was jam packed.  Wandered the ridgeline road and side roads marvelling at the state of island cars and the wide range of accomodation.  More pre-evening imbibing, another clear night with a bit less company.
    Up at sparrow fart and off back to Clevedon as we are still not confident on the river approach at anything other than half-tide.  A nice sail from Rakino to Papakohatu where the wind died and the iron sail had to take over again.
    Whle out we fitted tested and commissioned a new depth gauge, enhanced the stereo with a second amp and speakers in the saloon, installed skin fittings for the manual and electric bilge pumps and tried out a few bits of sailing and nav freeware.
    First sunburn of the season.  Feels great.  
  10. Upvote
    Island Time reacted to Sabre in Circumnavigating NZ.   
    Looks like Macgyver has got his engine running. Currently motoring across Hawkes bay 👍
  11. Upvote
    Island Time reacted to Sabre in Seafaring nation?   
    No I don't have to, yes and yes and I already have 🤘
    I have made my thoughts very clear.
    Your stance imo is ludicrous. Suggesting yachts and crew could simply head home around the horn even just to make a nonsensical point is beyond ridiculous.
    Contrary to your post, to the best of my recollection no one has stated that coming to NZ is the ONLY option for the cruisers however it is probably the safest, simplist and most sensible option.
    I wonder if you were sitting in the cockpit having a nice cold beer with some of these cruisers if you would be happy to make the same suggestions to their face?
    Many of these cruisers will be advancing in years, have worked  hard all their lives and are now having a crack at fulfilling the bucket list trip of their lifetime and you are suggesting tuff titties? fack off back to your country of origin because you are either paranoid about a virus they don't have or you are fiercely loyal to the government's stance on foriegn cruisers?
    Is empathy and common sense completely out of fashion? 
  12. Upvote
    Island Time got a reaction from Black Panther in Seafaring nation?   
    Fish, if you think the average cruising boat, or crew, is up to a trip around Cape Horn, you are sadly mistaken. You are underestimating the difficulties of that voyage, and the suitability of these vessels and their crews. Mostly. Some could, but they would be uncommon exceptions. 
    The other way (W) is possible, and boats go that way every year. However most of these boats would not have the endurance to do a non stop voyage of more than a month, they's need fuel, gas and provisions along the way. Right now they cant get any of that. Anywhere.
    Most cruisers take YEARS to complete a circumnavigation, they did not plan on extended continuous voyages, and their boats are not set up for that.
    What you, and others on here are suggesting is not, IMO feasible.
    I think if this goes on much longer, some will try to stay where they are (legally or not), and try to weather a cyclone if they are unlucky enough to encounter one. Some will abandon their or try to sell  boats and fly home, others will try what the German crew did, and some will try to sneak into countries that are closed.  It would be a difficult decision, whatever way they choose.
    I'm sure glad its not me out there this year.
  13. Upvote
    Island Time reacted to kiwi_jon in Circumnavigating NZ.   
    Puysegur Point to port
    Fri Sep 25 2020
    A change of plan.
    I was going to spend the night at Otago Retreat, the shallow channel between Coal Island and the Puysegur Point lighthouse depot landing. The idea was to have civilized night at anchor and then catch the NW wind in the morning.
    So the wind filled in early after dying from the South. With such a good breeze behind me I wanted to get a jump on the next weather system and use it to slingshot me round through Foveaux Strait, up the Catlins coast and on towards the Otago Peninsula. The big advantage is that the wind will be blowing off the land so I shouldn’t have anything like the horrendous seas I had to deal with off the West Coast.
    So I have resisted the Siren Song of the safe anchorage and am heading off into the night.
    I have just passed Puysegur Point, reputably the windiest place in NZ. There is 25 knots behind me and it should be a fast run tonight.
  14. Upvote
    Island Time reacted to Ed in Cold Front Today   
    To be fair, this thread is in Marine talk, which is usually has quite well informed commentary.
     
    Small talk on the other hand....

  15. Upvote
    Island Time got a reaction from Ed in Cold Front Today   
    I trained as a mechanical engineer. But I've not seen design details of this bridge, so I cant make sensible comments.
    Uninformed comment is usually not worth the time it took to write it, or read it!
  16. Like
    Island Time got a reaction from tuffyluffy in Seafaring nation?   
    This is a Stupid decision and will effect peoples well being, if not their lives.
    It is not realistic to tell the yachties out there to "go home" as voyages and seasons must align for small vessels to have the best chance of safe passage. There is no way to come to NZ safely once a cyclone is present! Most passages from the Islands are min 10 days, most of the quarantine is already done, so the risk is minimal This is a very big loss to the local marine industry Yep the director general may be a good doctor, but he obviously has no understanding of small boat voyaging.
     
  17. Like
    Island Time got a reaction from Brien in Seafaring nation?   
    This is a Stupid decision and will effect peoples well being, if not their lives.
    It is not realistic to tell the yachties out there to "go home" as voyages and seasons must align for small vessels to have the best chance of safe passage. There is no way to come to NZ safely once a cyclone is present! Most passages from the Islands are min 10 days, most of the quarantine is already done, so the risk is minimal This is a very big loss to the local marine industry Yep the director general may be a good doctor, but he obviously has no understanding of small boat voyaging.
     
  18. Upvote
    Island Time reacted to mcp in Best AGM battery   
    What type of boat are you building?
     
    Money no object,  no question, Lithium titanate for any purpose.   Otherwise for a cruiser/liveaboard Lithium Iron Phosphate or Lead carbon from a reputable manufacturer,  and why I don't say one or the other,  is because it depends on how you will use it.  If you cruise only 3 - 4 weeks a year I would say a quality AGM,  as it will take you a bloody long time to use 400-500 cycles if you system is set up correctly.   If you are a racer and want super light, your boat can be setup as light as your chequebook wants it to be.
  19. Upvote
    Island Time reacted to Romany in ACT   
    stop using 'emojis' and tell the poster that?
  20. Upvote
    Island Time got a reaction from Chloe in Damn the Rules, Rocna Inventor doing the NW Passage   
    Agreed, and to sail in another countries waters without their permission is to invite arrest and imprisonment. Possibly confiscation of your vessel. His risk, he must accept the consequences. Unfortunately his actions can have consequences for others following his path at a future date, even post covid.
  21. Upvote
    Island Time got a reaction from Chloe in Tauranga Shipping Channel Screw-Up   
    Maritime NZ report
    Latest issue of newsletters or media release. Problems? View in browser   Master and Chief Engineer plead guilty in MV Funing case

    15 SEPTEMBER 2020 The Master and Chief Engineer of the log-carrier MV Funing, have today been sentenced and fined after admitting charges relating to the grounding of the ship at the Port of Tauranga in July. 

    Master Liang Guang Hong and Chief Engineer Chameekara Prasad Nanayakkara both entered guilty pleas in the Tauranga District Court on 10 September to charges brought by Maritime NZ under the Maritime Transport Act (MTA) 1994. This followed an investigation by Maritime NZ after the Singapore-registered ship lost power and passed over a channel marker with the propeller becoming caught in the markerchain, before making contact with a sand bar in the Tauranga Harbour channel. 

    The Master was fined $3250.00 fine and ordered to pay $130.00 court costs, after pleading guilty to one charge under Section 65(1)(a) of the MTA, of operating the vessel “in a manner which caused unnecessary danger or risk to other persons or property, including the passengers and crew of the MV Funing.

    The Chief Engineer also admitted one charge under section 65(2)(a) of the MTA, for causing or permitting the ship to be “operated, maintained, or serviced, in a manner that caused unnecessary danger or risk to any other persons or property, including the passengers and crew of the MV Funing”. He was also fined $3250 and ordered to pay $130 court costs.

    The maximum penalty for both charges was 12 months’ imprisonment or a $10,000 fine.

    Michael-Paul Abbott, Maritime NZ’s Central Region Compliance Manager said, “following a series of checks on the engine of the Funing prior to its departure from the Port of Tauranga, a problem was found with the fuel quantity pistons. At this time, the wind was gusting 15 to 30 knots (28-56 kph) with the wave height approaching 4 metres and rain had reduced visibility”. 

    “The problem started when one of the engine’s fuel quantity pistons indicated an error, which means that if this isn’t addressed, the engine’s power will be reduced – which is power it needs when exiting the narrow harbour entrance.”

    In the hours leading up to the engine failure, the Chief Engineer tested the affected parts a number of times, each time triggering an alarm suggesting the problem had not been rectified. The decision was then made to override the mechanism that automatically slows down the vessel in the event of a problem with the engine, as an attempted precautionary measure. 

    “The Pilot subsequently came aboard around midnight and the master handed him the Pilot Card which indicated that there were no issues affecting a safe departure. But as the ship tried to increase speed on leaving Port, the Chief Engineer realised there was still a problem with one of the fuel quantity pistons and that the engine was not responding with the shift to ‘full ahead’ (full power). The Pilot asked the Master several times why the ship was going slowly, but did not receive a clear explanation,” Mr Abbott said.

    “As a result, the No. 2 engine cylinder lost all power, and during this time the wind and swell had increased. At 0043 hours the Pilot called the tug boats to come and assist and the Master ordered the anchor to be dropped. At 0047 hours the main engine stopped after the propeller became entangled with the channel marker while the stern swung around and came into contact with the sand bank.

    “The tugs then turned the vessel into the deeper channel water and held it there until it could be towed into safer anchorage. There it remained until 14 July when it was towed into port.”

    Mr Abbott said the Maritime investigation and subsequent prosecution proved that the Master knew there was an issue with the main engine prior to departure and failed to notify the Pilot that there was a problem. 

    The Chief Engineer was also proven to have failed to retest the main engine to ensure it was operating on all 5 cylinders after attending to the fuel quantity piston error.

    The Funing is currently being towed back to Singapore which is expected to take around 40 days.
    Maritime New Zealand Media Line: +64 4 499 7318
    .mnz-logo{max-width:175px;margin:25px 0 15px 0;align:left;}
  22. Upvote
    Island Time got a reaction from aardvarkash10 in UN latest climate outlook   
    Perhaps, but I'd have to say that when MOST people look at anything more than basic statistics, they dont understand what they are looking at, or perhaps more accurately the limitations of what they are looking at. Plus, in the current "fake news" and spin environment of our modern society, people select the numbers to suit their message. Read with caution.
  23. Upvote
    Island Time got a reaction from ex Elly in Tauranga Shipping Channel Screw-Up   
    Maritime NZ report
    Latest issue of newsletters or media release. Problems? View in browser   Master and Chief Engineer plead guilty in MV Funing case

    15 SEPTEMBER 2020 The Master and Chief Engineer of the log-carrier MV Funing, have today been sentenced and fined after admitting charges relating to the grounding of the ship at the Port of Tauranga in July. 

    Master Liang Guang Hong and Chief Engineer Chameekara Prasad Nanayakkara both entered guilty pleas in the Tauranga District Court on 10 September to charges brought by Maritime NZ under the Maritime Transport Act (MTA) 1994. This followed an investigation by Maritime NZ after the Singapore-registered ship lost power and passed over a channel marker with the propeller becoming caught in the markerchain, before making contact with a sand bar in the Tauranga Harbour channel. 

    The Master was fined $3250.00 fine and ordered to pay $130.00 court costs, after pleading guilty to one charge under Section 65(1)(a) of the MTA, of operating the vessel “in a manner which caused unnecessary danger or risk to other persons or property, including the passengers and crew of the MV Funing.

    The Chief Engineer also admitted one charge under section 65(2)(a) of the MTA, for causing or permitting the ship to be “operated, maintained, or serviced, in a manner that caused unnecessary danger or risk to any other persons or property, including the passengers and crew of the MV Funing”. He was also fined $3250 and ordered to pay $130 court costs.

    The maximum penalty for both charges was 12 months’ imprisonment or a $10,000 fine.

    Michael-Paul Abbott, Maritime NZ’s Central Region Compliance Manager said, “following a series of checks on the engine of the Funing prior to its departure from the Port of Tauranga, a problem was found with the fuel quantity pistons. At this time, the wind was gusting 15 to 30 knots (28-56 kph) with the wave height approaching 4 metres and rain had reduced visibility”. 

    “The problem started when one of the engine’s fuel quantity pistons indicated an error, which means that if this isn’t addressed, the engine’s power will be reduced – which is power it needs when exiting the narrow harbour entrance.”

    In the hours leading up to the engine failure, the Chief Engineer tested the affected parts a number of times, each time triggering an alarm suggesting the problem had not been rectified. The decision was then made to override the mechanism that automatically slows down the vessel in the event of a problem with the engine, as an attempted precautionary measure. 

    “The Pilot subsequently came aboard around midnight and the master handed him the Pilot Card which indicated that there were no issues affecting a safe departure. But as the ship tried to increase speed on leaving Port, the Chief Engineer realised there was still a problem with one of the fuel quantity pistons and that the engine was not responding with the shift to ‘full ahead’ (full power). The Pilot asked the Master several times why the ship was going slowly, but did not receive a clear explanation,” Mr Abbott said.

    “As a result, the No. 2 engine cylinder lost all power, and during this time the wind and swell had increased. At 0043 hours the Pilot called the tug boats to come and assist and the Master ordered the anchor to be dropped. At 0047 hours the main engine stopped after the propeller became entangled with the channel marker while the stern swung around and came into contact with the sand bank.

    “The tugs then turned the vessel into the deeper channel water and held it there until it could be towed into safer anchorage. There it remained until 14 July when it was towed into port.”

    Mr Abbott said the Maritime investigation and subsequent prosecution proved that the Master knew there was an issue with the main engine prior to departure and failed to notify the Pilot that there was a problem. 

    The Chief Engineer was also proven to have failed to retest the main engine to ensure it was operating on all 5 cylinders after attending to the fuel quantity piston error.

    The Funing is currently being towed back to Singapore which is expected to take around 40 days.
    Maritime New Zealand Media Line: +64 4 499 7318
    .mnz-logo{max-width:175px;margin:25px 0 15px 0;align:left;}
  24. Upvote
    Island Time got a reaction from Lukecollis in Just purchased - been parked up for 10 years   
    Change the impellor and try again. Sometimes the vulcanizing ov the rubber to the metal drive fails, and only the centre turns around. If not that, there has to be either a blockage or the water pump drive is broken.
  25. Upvote
    Island Time got a reaction from grantmc in Damn the Rules, Rocna Inventor doing the NW Passage   
    Any further posts to this thread on any topic other than the titled topic will be removed. If you guys want to talk about refugees etc, make a new topic in small talk. Please.
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