Jump to content

ex Elly

Advanced Members
  • Content Count

    866
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    6

Reputation Activity

  1. Upvote
    ex Elly reacted to Battgirl in Mooring Service Contractor   
    My Northcote mooring was serviced 2 weeks ago. I had requested it at the beginning of June. It needed to be done by July. 
    Auckland transport had sent me a notice late last year, a second and final notice in Feb this year. In August I received a notice of revocation of the mooring. 
    I responded by email, received no response. 
    The Harbourmaster now has a copy of the Mooring Inspection certificate. 
    I use and recommend Stuart at Tidal Engineering. 
  2. Upvote
    ex Elly reacted to grantmc in NZ to Fiji   
    Thought I'd close the topic by confirming I cleared into Fiji last Friday at the end of a 7 day quarantine off Denerau. Trip up from BoI was awesome. Fantastic crew (including a couple of highly capable cooks), and a nice comfy quick boat. We had some great laughs, brilliant music, wit only a single day/night of rain. Wind on the nose the entire trip, but you can't have everything.
    Very happy to have finally boarded my own boat here in Savusavu.
     
  3. Upvote
    ex Elly got a reaction from Sabre in Seafaring nation?   
    Cartoon in today's Auckland herald -

     
  4. Upvote
    ex Elly reacted to chariot in Circumnavigating NZ.   
    I would love to think the mainstream media could recognise your achievement and at least make the reast of NZ aware of what you have just completed.
    Congratulations on a great achievement.
  5. Upvote
    ex Elly reacted to AJ Oliver in Circumnavigating NZ.   
    His greatest achievement has been to type all of the notices out, on a little bitty screen . .  
    with one finger. 
  6. Upvote
    ex Elly got a reaction from tuffyluffy in Circumnavigating NZ.   
    The Circle is complete
    Wed Oct 07 2020
    At 1610 I crossed my outbound track, surging into Matiatia on a brisk Southwest wind. I rounded up in the lee of the headland, furling the genoa and dropped the main for the last time. After over a month at sea I felt like an albatross folding it wings as it returns to the land from its soaring across the boundless oceans.
    I have sailed two and a half thousand miles around New Zealand, through triumphs and disasters, challenges great and small, through happiness and despair. Through every emotion really. The hardest part has been dealing with myself, with the little mind that wants to give up or complain or be lazy or just feel sorry for itself. Out there alone I have passed through my own cold stormy nights but always I seem to manage to come through those into the glowing sunrise of a new day and I feel the better for the experience, cleansed in some way by the wind and the salt spray.
    On the dock, as I glide in on the wind, finally engineless simply because I have run out of fuel, are my dear friends and family. They come to help and share in what is for me a very moving moment. Their kindness and care touches me deeply.
    All these posts have been painstakingly tapped out, letter by letter with one finger, on the tiny keyboard on my phone, sometimes in very trying situations. It has been, in some way, a conversation I have been having with you. I had no one else to talk to.
    So thank you if you read them, and thank you if you helped out by supporting the restoration of the Kate. She’s a fine old ship.
    I am home now.
    The circle is complete.
  7. Upvote
    ex Elly got a reaction from jim s in Circumnavigating NZ.   
    The Circle is complete
    Wed Oct 07 2020
    At 1610 I crossed my outbound track, surging into Matiatia on a brisk Southwest wind. I rounded up in the lee of the headland, furling the genoa and dropped the main for the last time. After over a month at sea I felt like an albatross folding it wings as it returns to the land from its soaring across the boundless oceans.
    I have sailed two and a half thousand miles around New Zealand, through triumphs and disasters, challenges great and small, through happiness and despair. Through every emotion really. The hardest part has been dealing with myself, with the little mind that wants to give up or complain or be lazy or just feel sorry for itself. Out there alone I have passed through my own cold stormy nights but always I seem to manage to come through those into the glowing sunrise of a new day and I feel the better for the experience, cleansed in some way by the wind and the salt spray.
    On the dock, as I glide in on the wind, finally engineless simply because I have run out of fuel, are my dear friends and family. They come to help and share in what is for me a very moving moment. Their kindness and care touches me deeply.
    All these posts have been painstakingly tapped out, letter by letter with one finger, on the tiny keyboard on my phone, sometimes in very trying situations. It has been, in some way, a conversation I have been having with you. I had no one else to talk to.
    So thank you if you read them, and thank you if you helped out by supporting the restoration of the Kate. She’s a fine old ship.
    I am home now.
    The circle is complete.
  8. Like
    ex Elly got a reaction from bazzathemammoth in Circumnavigating NZ.   
    The Circle is complete
    Wed Oct 07 2020
    At 1610 I crossed my outbound track, surging into Matiatia on a brisk Southwest wind. I rounded up in the lee of the headland, furling the genoa and dropped the main for the last time. After over a month at sea I felt like an albatross folding it wings as it returns to the land from its soaring across the boundless oceans.
    I have sailed two and a half thousand miles around New Zealand, through triumphs and disasters, challenges great and small, through happiness and despair. Through every emotion really. The hardest part has been dealing with myself, with the little mind that wants to give up or complain or be lazy or just feel sorry for itself. Out there alone I have passed through my own cold stormy nights but always I seem to manage to come through those into the glowing sunrise of a new day and I feel the better for the experience, cleansed in some way by the wind and the salt spray.
    On the dock, as I glide in on the wind, finally engineless simply because I have run out of fuel, are my dear friends and family. They come to help and share in what is for me a very moving moment. Their kindness and care touches me deeply.
    All these posts have been painstakingly tapped out, letter by letter with one finger, on the tiny keyboard on my phone, sometimes in very trying situations. It has been, in some way, a conversation I have been having with you. I had no one else to talk to.
    So thank you if you read them, and thank you if you helped out by supporting the restoration of the Kate. She’s a fine old ship.
    I am home now.
    The circle is complete.
  9. Upvote
    ex Elly got a reaction from Sabre in Circumnavigating NZ.   
    The Circle is complete
    Wed Oct 07 2020
    At 1610 I crossed my outbound track, surging into Matiatia on a brisk Southwest wind. I rounded up in the lee of the headland, furling the genoa and dropped the main for the last time. After over a month at sea I felt like an albatross folding it wings as it returns to the land from its soaring across the boundless oceans.
    I have sailed two and a half thousand miles around New Zealand, through triumphs and disasters, challenges great and small, through happiness and despair. Through every emotion really. The hardest part has been dealing with myself, with the little mind that wants to give up or complain or be lazy or just feel sorry for itself. Out there alone I have passed through my own cold stormy nights but always I seem to manage to come through those into the glowing sunrise of a new day and I feel the better for the experience, cleansed in some way by the wind and the salt spray.
    On the dock, as I glide in on the wind, finally engineless simply because I have run out of fuel, are my dear friends and family. They come to help and share in what is for me a very moving moment. Their kindness and care touches me deeply.
    All these posts have been painstakingly tapped out, letter by letter with one finger, on the tiny keyboard on my phone, sometimes in very trying situations. It has been, in some way, a conversation I have been having with you. I had no one else to talk to.
    So thank you if you read them, and thank you if you helped out by supporting the restoration of the Kate. She’s a fine old ship.
    I am home now.
    The circle is complete.
  10. Upvote
    ex Elly got a reaction from splat in Circumnavigating NZ.   
    The Circle is complete
    Wed Oct 07 2020
    At 1610 I crossed my outbound track, surging into Matiatia on a brisk Southwest wind. I rounded up in the lee of the headland, furling the genoa and dropped the main for the last time. After over a month at sea I felt like an albatross folding it wings as it returns to the land from its soaring across the boundless oceans.
    I have sailed two and a half thousand miles around New Zealand, through triumphs and disasters, challenges great and small, through happiness and despair. Through every emotion really. The hardest part has been dealing with myself, with the little mind that wants to give up or complain or be lazy or just feel sorry for itself. Out there alone I have passed through my own cold stormy nights but always I seem to manage to come through those into the glowing sunrise of a new day and I feel the better for the experience, cleansed in some way by the wind and the salt spray.
    On the dock, as I glide in on the wind, finally engineless simply because I have run out of fuel, are my dear friends and family. They come to help and share in what is for me a very moving moment. Their kindness and care touches me deeply.
    All these posts have been painstakingly tapped out, letter by letter with one finger, on the tiny keyboard on my phone, sometimes in very trying situations. It has been, in some way, a conversation I have been having with you. I had no one else to talk to.
    So thank you if you read them, and thank you if you helped out by supporting the restoration of the Kate. She’s a fine old ship.
    I am home now.
    The circle is complete.
  11. Upvote
    ex Elly reacted to Cavatina in Circumnavigating NZ.   
    If anyone is interested I am starting a solo circumnavigation of New Zealand tomorrow, Monday the 7th of September. Leaving from Matiatia,  Waiheke Island. Part of the inspiration for this is to raise awareness and funds for the Waiheke Working Sail Charitable Trust which is restoring the 1898 Trading Cutter  the 'Kate'. She will be used as a youth sail training vessel.  You can follow my voyage on 'Cavatina', a steel Van der Stadt 34, on a tracking page on the Trust's website  www.waihekeworkingsail.org 
     
     



  12. Upvote
    ex Elly got a reaction from splat in Circumnavigating NZ.   
    The Hole in the Wall
    Wed Oct 07 2020
    It has been a fast close reach up the coast. At 0420 I pinch up past Ohinau Island and finally reach my waypoint 120 miles from East Cape. It’s been a long haul and a welcome arrival.
    Here I also pass through a place that signifies a homecoming for me from long ago. Ahead off the starboard bow lies Great Mercury Island, the home to where I was carried, through this passage, as a baby by my mother and where I grew up for the first twelve years of my life.
    The Hole In The Wall is so called because it is the one clear passage between the outlying point of Mercury Bay and the long chain of islands and reefs that make up the Mercury Group. To me it is also a portal of sorts, between the outside and home, and as I pass through it, coming this way, I always feel a sense of arriving in a place that is part of me, that I know, that formed and defined who I am now.
    As I pass and salute Old Man Rock, the lone sentinel who guards the centre of the channel, the moonlight shimmers on the sea and all around lie the sleeping hummocks of the scattered islands of the Mercurys; all islands that I have explored, scrambled over and absorbed into my being with that breathless sense of adventure that one has as a child. Some of that has never left me and so here I am, many years later, passing by my old stamping ground and close to concluding yet another adventure.
    One more Cape to go.
  13. Upvote
    ex Elly got a reaction from Deep Purple in A Cup without spectators   
    People said the same thing before Bermuda, and then everyone loved it.
     
  14. Upvote
    ex Elly reacted to 2flit in Dinghy fantasy   
    Thats' a youtube channel try here... https://bandbyachtdesigns.com/spindrift
  15. Upvote
    ex Elly reacted to DrWatson in This Weekend's Achievements   
    Not exactly sailing, but I did achieve a job offer... after 6 rounds of interviews... 13 different people!
  16. Upvote
    ex Elly reacted to Sabre in Seafaring nation?   
    I think simple common (uncommon) sense should have been applied.
    The cruisers situation is unique as many are effectively gypsies who all logistics aside don't have a home they can just hop on a plane and fly home to.
    The cruisers situation is undoubtedly a humanitarian issue and I really don't think a virus should void any countries responsibility to be a responsible international citizen.
    At the end of the day they are low numbers, low risk, minimal resources needed to manage and of great benifit to our marine industry. 
    And possibly worst of all, many international sailors will now look at NZ as a bunch of dicky cockwombles.
  17. Upvote
    ex Elly reacted to AJ Oliver in Damn the Rules, Rocna Inventor doing the NW Passage   
    A quick comment from an alternate universe: 
    ML King taught us that, if we determine that a law is unjust, 
    we can and should break it; but we should also be prepared to 
    accept the legal consequences (without whining). 
    That way, we can show our respect for the law in general while breaking a particular law. 
    Kind of like Socrates' approach. 
    On the whole, I support Mr. Smith. 
    Who knows, he might be able to strike a blow for the freedom of the seas by his action. 
  18. Upvote
    ex Elly reacted to 2flit in Circumnavigating NZ.   
    He's almost around the Banks Peninsula with some shelter in it's lee a long way back in.
     
    However, this was just posted.....
    Tue Sep 29 2020
    I am sitting on the floor, wedged between the saloon berths,cold and damp in my wet weather gear. I am watching the clear blue sky through the skylight. Occasionally it goes green as a big wave breaks right over the boat. Inside is a shambles. I would like to be somewhere else.
    Things were going fine this morning as we ran before an average gale and everything well under control with one third of the genoa rolled out.
    Then things escalated very quickly. Suddenly it was blowing 50 knts. The autopilot was overpowered so I took over. The sea was churned into a froth and the waves rapidly increased in size.It took all my strength to heave on the tiller and keep us in course. I looked behind me and a vertical wall of water loomed right over me. “This is going to hurt”, I muttered to myself as with a roar it broke over the boat and hurled me across the cockpit. Fortunately I had two tethers hooked on and was brought up short before I was smashed against the sides.
    I realised I couldn’t keep this up for more than a couple of hours and aimed for the safe haven of Akaroa 10 miles ahead. We struggled on.
    Suddenly, in a big gust, the furling line let go and the full genoa instantly deployed. This was disaster. I was suddenly helming a giant wind surfer which was doing 15knts down the waves. At that point the wind rose to 60 knts and we were doomed. I lost control on a big wave and the boat broached, we slewed on our side and the sheet snapped. I managed to haul the helm around, frantically winch in the other sheet and bring us into a heave to situation with the sail aback. Things were not looking good. We were laid on our side. There was far too much sail up, it was flogging terribly, the rig was shaking and the remaining sheet was rapidly sawing itself through on the shroud. I quickly grabbed a spare sheet and made my way up into the mayhem that was happening on the foredeck. With considerable difficulty I rove a new sheet, made my way back and got the furling line onto a winch then let go the windward sheet. It took me five minutes to laboriously furl the sail while it did it’s best to self destruct and shake the mast out of the boat.
    Things went quiet. I unleashed the helm and turned us downwind. We have been running ever since under bare poles and making 5 to 10 knots under the relentless wind and giant seas. We get smashed fairly regularly by breaking waves but the boats fine and apart from a wave that just forced the main hatch open and drenched everything we are getting along nicely.
    This was forecast to be 35 knts and it sure as hell isn’t. I hope it eases off soon.
     

  19. Upvote
    ex Elly got a reaction from 2flit in Circumnavigating NZ.   
    Mike Delamore grew up on Great Mercury Island before moving to Waiheke in 1966 when his family bought the Matiatia Farm. After travelling around the world across both land and sea, he returned permanently to Waiheke in the 1980s to raise a family and work on what would become the Fossil Bay Farm, as well as establish the Waiheke Island Steiner School and Kindergarten.
    After a long career in sailing that included time as a Fullers ferry captain and helming Super Yachts across the Atlantic, Mike retired from professional sailing several years ago to focus on his accommodation business, Fossil Bay Lodge, and traverse the canals of the United Kingdom each summer in his canal boat, Morgana.
    Mike has more than 20 years of maritime experience and has travelled over 50,000 miles at sea from Alaska to the Antarctic. Mike holds Superyacht Master 3000Gt and NZ Offshore Master Unlimited marine tickets and is a qualified RYA tutor and examiner.
  20. Upvote
    ex Elly reacted to 2flit in Seafaring nation?   
    No... I am saying that they could have gone three separate ways to avoid the risk of hurricanes. 
    They are Germans this means they are EU citizens. As an EU citizen, you are allowed to stay in French Polynesia and are allowed to renew this for quiet some time. Given this status:
    They could have stayed put on Nuka Hiva thru all of this. Which is exactly what we are doing here in New Zealand. We had planed to go to Fiji this season but decided that it was inappropriate to leave here and expect to have a hurricane refuge in some other country. They could have sailed south to the eastern Tuamotu where There have been no recorded cyclones in the Tuamotus in a La Nina year.  and the eastern end of the archipelago is basically hurricane free at all times. While it can get windy, there are an almost unlimited spots to anchor in the Lee of the Motus. They could have had the option of refueling and re-provisioning here and departing west I suppose they are pushing that way anyways? By mentioning Hawaii, I was only disagreeing with your statement that you can't sail there because of Hurricanes, and I pointed out that "World Cruising Routes" lists the Oct-Dec time period as a most desirable time to make this transit. Waiting until November is very practical. According to Noonsite Hawaii is open at this time but I have no idea of any other visa status that these two men and a woman from Germany may have. They do have all the options above.
    I still wish to reiterate that I too wished and had hoped that New Zealand would open it's borders to cruisers, but out of fairness to all the gov chose not to. This is very understandable, it is justified, and reasonable.
  21. Upvote
    ex Elly reacted to Ed in Cold Front Today   
    What complicates the matter is that strut is a stressed member. Fabricating a bit of steel is the easy bit, getting it in there is somewhat harder
    Imagine trying to replace a spreader, and you have to get the rig tension and mast bend back to where is should (must) be, without touching the turnbuckles or addind any significant weight aloft.
    Its certinaly not beyond the wit of man to complete, but considering the implications if it goes wrong the amount of planning, peer review  and analysis that goes into this will be significant
     
     
     
  22. Upvote
    ex Elly reacted to Fogg in Best AGM battery   
    My experience last 12 months tells me that is a recipe for disaster....
    I had 4x big expensive AGMs fitted to my boat last year by a well known professional marine electrics company and they made the schoolboy mistake of assuming all AGMs are the same. So they installed them and made sure all my charging systems were set you AGM (engine, shore, solar) and declared it “job done”.
    9 months later I noticed performance dropping off and at 10 months my shiny new AGMs were taken off the boat, bench-tested by the official supplier and declared dead.
    The cause was at time of installation the marine electricians should have looked at the exact product spec for these batteries and compared it with the exact product specs for the chargers on my boat the ensure they would give charging outputs within required spec of the batteries. They failed to do this. The difference was only around 0.3v (undercharging for bulk, absorption and float) but over 9-10 months the accumulated effect was enough to kill the whole bank of 4x new AGM batts.
    So don’t make the same mistake!
  23. Upvote
    ex Elly reacted to Jon in Circumnavigating NZ.   
    He’s obviously in good spirits
    Single handed sailors seem always to be glass half full people 
    Heres his latest blog
    The call of the kea
    Tue Sep 15 2020
    Sitting on a mooring in Deepwater Basin. It is incredibly quiet and still. The only sound the burbling of my caveman TV ( the Dickinson diesel stove) and high up in the mist the call of a kea. I will be here for three or four days as the weather pattern is going to stay the same until a NW change later in the week. I will wait for my spare autopilot to arrive and repair some main sail slugs that broke right out of the track. There was an awful lot of sail flogging going on at times when the boat rounded up on the big waves. I am going to have a long hot shower, put some clean clothes on, eat a decent meal and toast my feet in front of the fire. As Ratty said to Mole: “There’s simply nothing half as much fun as messing around in boats”.
  24. Upvote
    ex Elly reacted to Island Time in Tauranga Shipping Channel Screw-Up   
    Maritime NZ report
    Latest issue of newsletters or media release. Problems? View in browser   Master and Chief Engineer plead guilty in MV Funing case

    15 SEPTEMBER 2020 The Master and Chief Engineer of the log-carrier MV Funing, have today been sentenced and fined after admitting charges relating to the grounding of the ship at the Port of Tauranga in July. 

    Master Liang Guang Hong and Chief Engineer Chameekara Prasad Nanayakkara both entered guilty pleas in the Tauranga District Court on 10 September to charges brought by Maritime NZ under the Maritime Transport Act (MTA) 1994. This followed an investigation by Maritime NZ after the Singapore-registered ship lost power and passed over a channel marker with the propeller becoming caught in the markerchain, before making contact with a sand bar in the Tauranga Harbour channel. 

    The Master was fined $3250.00 fine and ordered to pay $130.00 court costs, after pleading guilty to one charge under Section 65(1)(a) of the MTA, of operating the vessel “in a manner which caused unnecessary danger or risk to other persons or property, including the passengers and crew of the MV Funing.

    The Chief Engineer also admitted one charge under section 65(2)(a) of the MTA, for causing or permitting the ship to be “operated, maintained, or serviced, in a manner that caused unnecessary danger or risk to any other persons or property, including the passengers and crew of the MV Funing”. He was also fined $3250 and ordered to pay $130 court costs.

    The maximum penalty for both charges was 12 months’ imprisonment or a $10,000 fine.

    Michael-Paul Abbott, Maritime NZ’s Central Region Compliance Manager said, “following a series of checks on the engine of the Funing prior to its departure from the Port of Tauranga, a problem was found with the fuel quantity pistons. At this time, the wind was gusting 15 to 30 knots (28-56 kph) with the wave height approaching 4 metres and rain had reduced visibility”. 

    “The problem started when one of the engine’s fuel quantity pistons indicated an error, which means that if this isn’t addressed, the engine’s power will be reduced – which is power it needs when exiting the narrow harbour entrance.”

    In the hours leading up to the engine failure, the Chief Engineer tested the affected parts a number of times, each time triggering an alarm suggesting the problem had not been rectified. The decision was then made to override the mechanism that automatically slows down the vessel in the event of a problem with the engine, as an attempted precautionary measure. 

    “The Pilot subsequently came aboard around midnight and the master handed him the Pilot Card which indicated that there were no issues affecting a safe departure. But as the ship tried to increase speed on leaving Port, the Chief Engineer realised there was still a problem with one of the fuel quantity pistons and that the engine was not responding with the shift to ‘full ahead’ (full power). The Pilot asked the Master several times why the ship was going slowly, but did not receive a clear explanation,” Mr Abbott said.

    “As a result, the No. 2 engine cylinder lost all power, and during this time the wind and swell had increased. At 0043 hours the Pilot called the tug boats to come and assist and the Master ordered the anchor to be dropped. At 0047 hours the main engine stopped after the propeller became entangled with the channel marker while the stern swung around and came into contact with the sand bank.

    “The tugs then turned the vessel into the deeper channel water and held it there until it could be towed into safer anchorage. There it remained until 14 July when it was towed into port.”

    Mr Abbott said the Maritime investigation and subsequent prosecution proved that the Master knew there was an issue with the main engine prior to departure and failed to notify the Pilot that there was a problem. 

    The Chief Engineer was also proven to have failed to retest the main engine to ensure it was operating on all 5 cylinders after attending to the fuel quantity piston error.

    The Funing is currently being towed back to Singapore which is expected to take around 40 days.
    Maritime New Zealand Media Line: +64 4 499 7318
    .mnz-logo{max-width:175px;margin:25px 0 15px 0;align:left;}
  25. Upvote
    ex Elly got a reaction from Clipper in Enduro   
    I think the Waikato Trailer Yacht Squadron used to race through there in the 100 miler race.
     
×
×
  • Create New...