Jump to content

Sea sickness tips n tricks


Recommended Posts

There was a thread on this somewhere but I can't find it.

 

This just in from one of the lads I dive with which maybe of interest to some.

 

Seasickness or Motion Sickness Seasickness is a condition individuals may experience when on a moving platform. It involves a general feeling of illness, dizziness, nausea and vomiting. It is also called motion sickness. Passive motions disturb fluid movement within the labyrinth and affects one's sense of balance and equilibrium. It is exaggerated when the brain receives conflicting messages delivered from the eyes, muscles and joint sensors (proprioceptors). In a closed room, the view indicates that the surroundings are still, while the signals from the labyrinth indicate that the body is moving. Motion sickness can occur when traveling on a ship, plane, train, bus or car. Some people are more sensitive than others, but if the motion stimuli are strong and the exposure lasts long enough, nearly all individuals will experience it. Symptoms

The symptoms of motion sickness include dizziness, sweating, nausea, vomiting and a general feeling of discomfort or illness. Symptoms can strike suddenly and progress from simply not feeling well to cold sweats, dizziness and vomiting. Motion sickness is more common in women and in children 2-12 years old. Individuals who suffer from migraine headaches are also more prone to motion sickness. Motion sickness lasts as long as the motion lasts. Once the motion stops, symptoms quickly subside. Some people feel "sea legs" after a long sojourn at sea.

Prevention and Management
 

If you know you have motion sickness or might be prone to it, consider this advice:

  • On a boat: Stay on deck and focus on the horizon. Avoid inhaling exhaust fumes.

  • In a car: Sit in the front seat. If you are the passenger, look at the scenery in the distance.

  • Do not read in moving vehicles. Reading makes motion sickness worse.

  • Avoid heavy meals prior to diving.

  • Drink plenty of water.

  • Avoid alcohol the evening before you travel.

  • If possible, stand up. Sitting or lying down can make you feel worse.

  • Eat dry crackers to help settle a queasy stomach.

  • Avoid others who have become nauseous with motion sickness.
Treatment

Motion sickness can be treated with over-the-counter and prescription drug products.

  • Over-the-counter products: Antihistamines are commonly used both to prevent and treat motion sickness. A side effect of antihistamines is drowsiness, which is exaggerated when alcohol is consumed. Drowsiness may adversely affect diver safety.

  • Prescription products: The scopolamine skin patch (Transderm Scop) is a popular option. The patch is applied to the skin area behind the ear at least eight hours before exposure and can help prevent motion sickness for up to three days per patch. Scopolamine may cause dry mouth, blurry vision, drowsiness and dizziness. Patients with glaucoma, enlarged prostate and some other health problems should not use this drug. Be sure to tell your doctor of your existing health problems to help determine which drug is best suited for you.
  • Alternative remedies: Various alternative remedies have been promoted as being helpful in relieving or preventing motion sickness. In most cases, the evidence of efficacy is missing. However, if you have mild symptoms, you may try ginger or peppermint products to ease your symptoms without risking side effects.
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

  • On a boat: Stay on deck and focus on the horizon. Avoid inhaling exhaust fumes.

 

......and whilst focusing on the horizon keep a small part of the boat in field of view....its the 'disconnect' in what your inner ear is telling you about your motion vs. that you are seeing that makes you crook.

 

By including a bit of the boat in view as well as the horizon to have two points of reference to your motion to combat the confusion going on in your inner ear. If you just use the horizon there is no anticipation of the actual boat motion you are feeling, so sitting on the rail gazing at the horizon may not help. I hope that makes sense...

Link to post
Share on other sites

There are three stages:

 

1. WANTING to die

 

2. WISHING you were dead

 

3. WONDERING WHY you are knot dead already.

 

The best known cure is to read a book about GASTRO REFLEXES whilst sitting under a tree and see how great that knowledge has improved your outlook. :thumbup:

Link to post
Share on other sites

......and whilst focusing on the horizon keep a small part of the boat in field of view....its the 'disconnect' in what your inner ear is telling you about your motion vs. that you are seeing that makes you crook.

 

By including a bit of the boat in view as well as the horizon to have two points of reference to your motion to combat the confusion going on in your inner ear. If you just use the horizon there is no anticipation of the actual boat motion you are feeling, so sitting on the rail gazing at the horizon may not help. I hope that makes sense...

 

It get worse when one sees a sea bird moving in circles towards a plane flying by, moving in the window of a boat that is moving in relationship to waves and swells moving in from the moving horizon which is moving in relation to the distant land, whist the contents of your glass are definitely moving differently to the contents of ones' stomach, which is all well and good until one tries moving to stand up.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have tried a number of products. Looking at a number of cruising forums they recommended Stugeron. I have used it a lot now and I find it very good. We keep a supply on board for the crew now. I get it from Chemist Direct in the UK. Managed to make it around the North Island without throwing up. Felt like crap at times but they make a huge difference.

Link to post
Share on other sites

+1 Guzz, Stugeron is good, Stupid that it is not available here from normal sources. We carry about 4-5 different medications for seasickness most of the time. Most people will respond well to one of them, and the final threat of the suppository type usually works wonders without even getting it out of it's packet  :sick:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Most people will respond well to one of them, and the final threat of the suppository type usually works wonders without even getting it out of it's packet  :sick:

Oh yeah totally agree 100%. On a pre departure briefing I talk sea sickness and while doing it put a packet of suppositories, a jar of Vaseline and a foot or so of 20mm doweling on the table, them point out if anyone gets really crook I have the cure. It's amazing how many don't suffer after that :D

 

A fair bit of early trip sea sickness can be attributed to anxiety, especially in newbies. Just be a little cautious you are treating the right thing with the right stuff. Sometimes just getting their head out of that 'I can't see land anymore, I'm about to die!' mindset can work wonders.

Link to post
Share on other sites

One friend who does suffer, used to take seasickness pills for the MONTH before a major race.

Mind you, that was because of the "unreliable crew" in the OSTAR races years ago as well as many other solo trips. Several other competitors did similar for say a week before.

 

For you youngsters, OSTAR = Observers Singlehanded Trans Atlantic Race from Plymouth UK to Newport RI USA.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe we need to start a Ginger Vs Maryanne thread - probably all lost on the young ones anyway? Hands up who knows what Im actually talking about!

Yep thanks BP, seeing him on monday, I'll give you call when Im up there, perhaps a coffee and catch up time permitting.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed ! Stugeron works for most.Doesn't seem to make you drowsy and will usually bring you right even once you have started feeling sick.Interesting that it is unavailable here.Pharmaceutical politics no doubt and never mind the customers....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe we need to start a Ginger Vs Maryanne thread - probably all lost on the young ones anyway? Hands up who knows what Im actually talking about!

 

:thumbup:

But I think that has been done before, but not this century. 

Ginger-or-Mary-Ann.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...