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YNZ Safety Regulation Amendment


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I'd like to think I'm much the same.  I like to keep my boat in a Cat 3 state even for cruising; albeit the Cat 3 certificate isn't kept current.   My biggest issue with this amendment is the increa

Agree with you both.   I'm told what you can do is hang a 20lt bottle of water off the end of your kite pole and swing it out to one side. Then do some fiddling with al or bits of that, I can't quit

The inspectors have the ability to pass a vessel due to it's offshore past I had a bit of a disagreement with one inspector about chainplate fixings. He said he'd pass the boat on a historical basis.

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And what conditions were you in?  Are they conditions that we could reasonably expect to still be racing in with a Cat 3 race like the coastal?

 

One article I read indicated breaking swells greater than 1/2 the overall boat length (in my case 5m).

 

http://www.yachtingmonthly.com/yacht-reviews/understand-boat-statistics-30154

 

 

 

After tests conducted for his book Heavy Weather Sailing, Peter Bruce concluded that any yacht will capsize if hit beam-on by a wave higher than half her overall length. Fortunately, with reasonable attention to weather forecasts, coastal cruisers need never encounter waves of that size, so it’s not a big issue, just worth a glance. 
 
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Yep, that sounds right - 1/2 WL length as height of breaking part of the wave, ANY yacht will capsize if hit by it beam on. This is partly why lying ahull is dangerous, and currently out of fashion. You are either disabled or stupid if you leave you boat beam on to such seas. IMO.

Furthermore, dangers from other breakers -  IIRC the danger occurs when a yacht is in waves with breaking crests of a height 1/3rd of her WL length, when sailing downwind. In these conditions, if allowed to broach, she is very likely to be rolled in the wave crest. This is the point where I generally adopt storm tactics. IMO at this point any race or event is a distant second to the safety of the vessel and crew.

Remember this is all for a cruiser. A fast, planning boat, that can keep pace with or pass the wave train, and has a strong crew (or AP) capable of accurately steering indefinitely will likely keep sailing.

Bloody unlikely in a CC, but quite possible off the NZ coast - like the RNI etc

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Remember this is all for a cruiser. A fast, planning boat, that can keep pace with or pass the wave train, and has a strong crew (or AP) capable of accurately steering indefinitely will likely keep sailing.

Bloody unlikely in a CC, but quite possible off the NZ coast - like the RNI etc

 

I assume as long as there is sea room to do so.  RNI / RNZ are Cat 2 races anyway and personally I wouldn't want to attempt these sorts of races in a 1020 without serious modification.

 

It's interesting that YNZ are upping the stakes for rollover damage containment but nothing has been said about increased prevention e.g. mandatory sea anchor.  I'm not even sure what is practical given the limited sea room in a race like the coastal.  The best form of prevention is not to go out (or stay out) in these sorts of conditions.  I would be not starting or withdrawing and seeking shelter well before reaching these sorts of conditions.

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Agreed Farrari, but there IS provision for a drogue or sea anchor in the current regs - might just be for cat 1, I have not checked, but it is there.

 

Absolutely agree about sea room - although a parachute does not need much. Into port safely if you can, a drogue can sure help if the port is downwind. You can only do what you can do.... 

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Uncertain of exact numbers for obvious reasons but north cape recorded a peak gust of102kn. My humble estimate was that we were getting steady 70's. Wind gear pegged at 60 for a number of hours. Biggest problem was it came with a 90 degree windshift so produced humongous breaking pyramid of water with probably the top 20FT breaking.

A few years later I was preparing a boat for the southern ocean and screwed the floorboards down. I haven't bothered on anything since. Would cheerfully head off to Fiji on BP without and just plain nuts for coastal sailing.

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