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Yacht missing around Gisbourne


JK

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Personally I think the responsibility lies with the sailor. No voyage plan, no comms, no obvious sign of distress should result in no search.

I know this is not the PC view, and that in the current environment the authorities did the right thing. I just don't agree with it. Personal responsibility is something sadly lacking in many....

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Good learning experience for all involved I reckon especially the skipper.

 

Good training for the RAF too.

 

If I had a 20yr old inexperienced kid out there and they hadn't made contact like they said they would I would be out there looking for them.

 

Can't be that much real expense involved as airforce are flying around and paying staff regardless.

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Correct if the National programme don't run it then it probably belongs with Womens Day with many of the other headlines, its a shame to see the Herald slipping lower and lower, because no one reads what has been written before rushing to print patently wrong headers.

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The guy had the brains to anchor while weather looked suspect , as for vhf radios , mobile phone . If it's not turned on while cruising then tough his call , I turn my own mob off some times under way , eperb well we don't know if he has one , but that's his choice , unless he presses the button , there's no problem , skeds would had been a good idear each day even a tex , to a friend in his case , as for SAR , that does cost time and money , there call to search , there time , there cost , as a they say good training , but they had to say , wet wont be charging anyone , it's a great world , we boaties have these things for , space , the love of , piece and quiet , to be with nature, it's getting harder even on the water

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Personally I think the responsibility lies with the sailor. No voyage plan, no comms, no obvious sign of distress should result in no search.

I know this is not the PC view, and that in the current environment the authorities did the right thing. I just don't agree with it. Personal responsibility is something sadly lacking in many....

Oh yes!

 

What's more personal responsibility is being discouraged more and more as the happy clappys want to run everyone else's lives for them. The taxpayer is going to be up for some seriously large coin if SAR goes up every time someone doesn't respond to a TXT in 5 mins. I bet the worried friend wasn't a boatie, they usually aren't.

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Agree with Island time and others , it's up to the skipper , the blue coats respond till the skipper makes contact , if they don't a drama could be happening , my old dad used to say help another boatie in distress as you would want in the same , it's gone in place of user payes systerm or charge up , . To be helped by coastguard the first words out of the mouths are you a paid member , usually say it when you are struggling with a mast over the side trying to teather it to the boat to save your self in 30 kts it , but you the skipper have the responsibility to set his boat up to handle easily and have the nesserary gear for a mishap , bolt cutters , fire extinguishers , vhf, mobile ph , first aid kit life jackets , pumps , and it goes on

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Agree with IT here.  Responsibility ends with the skipper.   If my memory serves me well, or maybe it is just my imagination, but on delivery trips back in the late 70,s early 80's I did between Lyttelton/Nelson/Picton etc I recall that the skipper used to file a 10 minute form/report??? or something like that with the local police just prior to departure??  Maybe I just dreamed this? But I am sure I recall  that it was an official form that required crew details, boat and all the rest of it along with destination etc.  Bit like a local CG Trip Report, maybe.

 

This would have probably changed the deal in this situation where a full scale search (twice) was launched after someone other than the skipper contacted the authorities.  My 2c worth anyway.

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http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11716606

 

Must say I'm extremely uncomfortable about the language in this story.

Authorities want to "speak" to this guy about going sailing, cause he won't call them on th radio!

 

Coast guard at Tauranga want to tell him not to sail to Auckland, but are still waiting for him to arrive.

 

Authorities searched for him twice, and on both occasions found him safe and well... f*ck me, stop trying to rescue him then, if he doesn't need rescuing. Leave him to do his own thing.

 

They know he has a working radio, cause apparently a boat gave him one.

 

JUST LEAVE HIM ALONE!

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He had to be searched for twice - on Monday and on Thursday last week - but each time, he appeared in good spirits and his yacht was undamaged. Authorities were unable to communicate with him so they left him, hoping to speak to him when he docked.

 

But tonight, a spokesperson from the Tauranga Coast Guard said they had not heard from DeWet and did not know if or when he would arrive in the Tauranga Harbour.

 

Tauranga sore several milimetres of rain today like the rest of thr country with gusty southeasterly winds.

 

Holy sh*t - Tauranga has seen several millimetres of rain, that's like a major natural disaster, are you guys OK? Quick, declare a state of emergency!

 

Idiots.

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Yup - still desperately hanging on to their sensationalism in the hope that an actual story might eventuate. This sort of journalism worries me. If they get desperate enough they'll trip over fleeing refugees, buy weapons on line and then try to pass off the transaction as illegal, pay dodgy child snatchers or send out a crack squad to slash sails and douse engines in seawater - all to capture "a story"!

Just sayin'. . .

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yeh one of the lads at work just pointed me to that after my rant last week.

 

Quickly read the act - I wonder just what the "clear grounds" are for imposing S55 in this case.  They have to have clear grounds that the situation is a danger to life or property.

 

And if a Harbourmaster has the power to do this then why the hell aren't they utilising this section when some of our "peers" in the stinkpot world set off in small ships, overweight with no lifejackets!

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Very disturbing, both what was done and how it was reported. He allegedly "sparked a national rescue effort" - ah...no, he was off the east coast between Napier and Tauranga. And then even though he was safely anchored at Whale Island, they forced him instead to cross the "notorious Whakatane bar."

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This is not good.  I appreciate the desire to keep an eye on less experienced people but this is serious bullkaka.  Why the hell would you direct someone to come in if they're safely anchored and in good shape?  What next?

I agreed that I'd love to see the overloaded stinkpot owners summoned but I really like that anyone can buy a boat and learn to sail... I mean, that's how I did it.

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