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Sailor in liferaft off Norfolk


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The rescue is a different issue, as has been explained on this forum many times over the years the search and rescue is an obligation that NZ has as part of an international agreement. The hours spent

I'm pretty stunned by your comments Steve Pope and have to agree with Saturday here. Do you think we shouldn't have car safety rules too? Seat belts? Blood alcohol limits? I'm sick of my taxes paying

He circumnavigated the North Island as a proof of boats ability, he did have crew leave the boat half way around as the crew thought he was pushing it too hard, but that's the way he sailed. I doubt a

Looking at the video from 7 Sharp Phil explains that the Stbd Rigging Bulkhead simply tore free from the hull and exited through the deck. Presumably this took a big chunk of hull/deck structure with it and the mast then did more damage.

 

So It wasn't the Chainplate or the Fasteners but essentially a structural failure of the hull/bulkhead joint.

Yep, my comment was before the interview. I do know of several t32s that have had chainplate/bolt failure, in some cases leading to rig over.

 

Can imagine that with what happened and from the sounds of it quite a large hole

being left it would be very difficult to prevent water coming in so the decision to get off seems well justified.

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  • 6 months later...
Guest Saturday Night Special

I have sat back and waited to see what would happen over this one with the Platino episode going on its time to put a few facts out there about this one .The boat was a townson 32 hull and decks built by Keith Atkinson finshed off at home on the front lawn of the original owner at Algies bay .The boat was refused Category one inspection By 2 category 1 inspectors One of which is a renown senior yachtsman the other a well respected designer .The Co owner/sailor went and found another inspector to certify the vessel(YNZ head of category inspections knew all this and it should have raised a red flag ) The vessel made its trip to Vanuatu .whereby the Local religious fraternity in Warkworth to which the owner belongs said to the first Category inspectors brother at the local doctors office how wrong category inspector one was and that he did not know what he was doing.The answer from the Brother was simple It made it there but it has not made it home yet. 2 days latter it was on the bottom .MSA now herald the skipper a hero as he did all the things right to save his own life (what bullshit).The facts are 2 Category inspectors deemed the boat unfit YNZ knew this yet passed it anyway (You cant do that with a wof for a car)I advised the owner that the scantlinigs of the boat weren't up to spec and I made some of the safety gear and there was a high chance this would happen . So things arn't always as Mags and bulshit media portray

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He circumnavigated the North Island as a proof of boats ability, he did have crew leave the boat half way around as the crew thought he was pushing it too hard, but that's the way he sailed. I doubt any Cat 1 inspector would have found the chain plate defect, if that is what it was?

There must be a level of trust and faith that any skipper sailing North knows what he was doing.

Platino, total refit, big strong vessel, boat builder onboard, no cat 1 inspector would have ever considered that the main sheet in a jybe could take out the steering pedestal and totally disable the vessel, up until it happened that is, it would have been considered an impossibility.

The sea takes no prisoners! sh*t can happen out there, and it does, Does that mean we need more restrictions / rules? No, just accept that life is a risk, a a lot of adventures are risky, but a risk well worth taking.

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Guest Saturday Night Special

He circumnavigated the North Island as a proof of boats ability, he did have crew leave the boat half way around as the crew thought he was pushing it too hard, but that's the way he sailed. I doubt any Cat 1 inspector would have found the chain plate defect, if that is what it was?

There must be a level of trust and faith that any skipper sailing North knows what he was doing.

Platino, total refit, big strong vessel, boat builder onboard, no cat 1 inspector would have ever considered that the main sheet in a jybe could take out the steering pedestal and totally disable the vessel, up until it happened that is, it would have been considered an impossibility.

The sea takes no prisoners! sh*t can happen out there, and it does, Does that mean we need more restrictions / rules? No, just accept that life is a risk, a a lot of adventures are risky, but a risk well worth taking.

he was warned the 1st cat inspector had won a one ton cup nationals won a tauranga port vial race taken boats to oisaka in osaka race 5 hobarts 3 noumeas and was at the forefront of the light displacement boom  .you want to start paying for people to be picked up thats fine but dont expect others to suffer through idiots remeber 2 inspectors said the boats not fit to go

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The rescue is a different issue, as has been explained on this forum many times over the years the search and rescue is an obligation that NZ has as part of an international agreement. The hours spent in the air are spent whether looking for a distressed yacht or just flying over Minerva reef quizzing every yacht by VHF as to their intentions. (are you heading for NZ). It is considered acceptable practice for Sub hunting. The cost for flying time was already allocated, just used in a humanitarian way, rather than a military one.

Every Cat 1 inspector is doing what they think is best. Some are more flexible than others, some are, as she is written so it shall be. 1 or 2 have lost more masts than most of us put together. They all have their pet axes to grind, Cat 1 is at this stage an advisory, though it appears to be morphing into a, thou shalt.

Kevin, your taxes are always going to be spent without your personal approval , fools and ignorant people are with us, like it or not, most make it through. If this guy was a fool he was pretty well organised, Should it have happened, no, but it did. Into the life raft, grab bag at the ready, epirb on etc. a good result.

 

I'm pretty stunned by your comments Steve Pope and have to agree with Saturday here. Do you think we shouldn't have car safety rules too? Seat belts? Blood alcohol limits? I'm sick of my taxes paying for the ignorant or the fools.

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For the record Waimanu had ONE Cat 1 inspector. We spoke to a couple of others (no inspection included) who recommended that we find an inspector who had relevant experience of the type of vessel to be inspected. Most inspectors these days are competent for fibreglass etc but not as familiar with timber yachts. The inspector we used is a competent timber yacht builder and inspector who has inspected many yachts which have successfully travelled offshore. 

 

None of the work done at home for the original build was structural - all structural boat building when Waimanu was built was by Atkinsons at Browns Bay. Home work was finishing work. 

 

Windows were replaced with toughened glass and had an additional fastening layer fitted two years prior to the Vanuatu trip. Various other strengthenings were also made. 

 

Prior to modern materials the size and style of yacht that sailed offshore was very similar to Waimanu. 

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Yep, my comment was before the interview. I do know of several t32s that have had chainplate/bolt failure, in some cases leading to rig over.

 

Can imagine that with what happened and from the sounds of it quite a large hole

being left it would be very difficult to prevent water coming in so the decision to get off seems well justified.

 

Skipper said that the water ingress was mainly below the waterline ie that the mast had stoved in some planking. Location was not visible so probably alongside one of the tanks. The ingress was too fast to stay ahead of with bailing hence decision to take to the liferaft. 

 

He had initially intended to cut away the rig and grabbed the bolt cutters to do so but water ingress was too rapid to make it effective for saving the rig and setting up a jury. 

 

Water ingress through hole in deck was not the main source - that would have been an easy leak fix that he would have made if suitable

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