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yacht in big trouble off Whangarei


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The biggest problem I can remember is that, it's comparatively shallower than a bit further out so the waves tend to stand up a fair bit. Not as bad as the Colville channel, but still a handful. 

If you go further out towards the Mokes, you would start getting shelter from the Barrier, which I would think be a bit more comfortable.

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Coastguard attempted FOUR rescues. Including from helicopter. I'm fairly sure they would have 'just towed the boat in' if they could have. It certainly wasn't a case of not thinking of it...

Jetski registration came about because they are essentially unidentifiable and there are now lots of the little suckers. We all have sail numbers or names on the side.    I learnt not to swim anywhe

the fact that cg couldn't get out to them says a lot about the conditions, i'd say.

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Would heading to Great Barrier have been a plan? Hard to navigate if no nav gear or charts, but perhaps someone could have met them in the lee and guided them in? A few weeks ago I was sheltering in lee of Waiheke and the swell from outside in the gulf wrapped right around and swayed us at anchor.

 

BTW huge thanks to wheels and others who have given me new respect for this coast.

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Could someone with experience explain to me why they did not just run down the coast (wind was from north or north east quadrant wasn't it?) until either conditions abated, or a much easier option than breaking seas in Whangarei Harbour entrance was found?

I am not making judgement on them, wouldn't dream of it with my own lack of experience, just wanting input from those that have been there done that in similar situations.

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It was easterly. Or Slightly S of East. You can't run off a lee shore. Passage to Great Barrier was directly to windward, they could not even make it to the poor knights. I'd have to say that most local yachts would have difficulty making any distance at all to weather in those conditions.

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It was easterly. Or Slightly S of East. You can't run off a lee shore. Passage to Great Barrier was directly to windward, they could not even make it to the poor knights. I'd have to say that most local yachts would have difficulty making any distance at all to weather in those conditions.

Understand.

Thanks for explanation.

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Someone else suggested "throwing out all your anchor rope and chain a mile or two off the shore..." and that doing so would have held them in place. Can anyone elaborate on this as an option in similar conditions? Wouldn't have been a fun night, I am sure, but better than ending up on the rocks.

 

This makes me want to practice deploying the sea anchor that came with my boat...

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Poor Knights for shelter was never a realistic option as anyone who has been through there in a big East will tell you , in fact I would take great issue with the person who suggested it.

Whangaruru straight downwind with a wide safe entrance as long as you stay off the wide berth - Rimiriki rocks was the obvious solution.  The coastguard are limited in what they can do with RIBS -as they are not a happy thing when not planing in big seas and wind. The old Tut english coastguard boat would have been much more appropriate.At least the couple are ok, which after all is the main thing after this unnecessary event- they are popping out those boats dozens a day. 

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Yeah Mimi was the best option for ESE. Sad.

 

 A friend of mine was doing a 2 handed Round Waiheke club race  10 or 15 years ago in his D28.  They were in a real 40 knots by the bottom end of Waiheke, beat up into big northerlies and made a seamanship decision to go on past Gannet before tacking  even though they could have layed through earlier.

Annnnyway, as they tacked  they lost their rudder and found themselves without steering( they rounded up) and a bukh 10 . Couldn't make headway out and drifted backwards over time to the seaward side ( Northern coast ) of what forms Hooks bay. 

Their  penultimate  resort was to anchor and guess what, that thing held. They were anchored in  what the Waiheke rescue boat people described  as the worst conditions they'd been in, very big seas and gusts well into the high 30's through 40's. They got towed out there.

 The funny part of the story is they went coast walking a couple of months later and found the rudder, which had broken off at a through bolt on the waterline.

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Getting to your destination as a must, is not high on my priority. Perhaps they tried running back to where they came from and broached surfing waves.  Then running with resistance would be next choice. 

With plotter failed and poor viz the pressure would be really on. Limited fuel precludes going anywhere far. Not a good situation.

I wonder what %  older people get the benefit of all the wx sources? 

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