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World first electric tug P.O.A. NZ gets first boat. Although it cost double of non electric


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It's hardly experimenting, EV fixed purpose marine craft have been around for a few years now. I think the Norway ferry was 2015? Electric motors are nothing new as diesel electrics have been around for a few decades i think. The motors and batteries are quite well understood now, The motors especially. With the Welly ferry going electric I'd expect to see more of this type of thing as it becomes more business as usual

 

NZ has a long proud history of innovation, Rutherford paved the way for the bomb. Global medcine has a kiwi to thank for the disposable syringe, OLED displays was a kiwi thing in part, Jet boat again NZ, I hear our sailors are pretty good and the agriculture sector is bloody efficient.

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The risk is carried by the shareholders - Auckland council, hence ratepayers.....

Last year, POAL had a revenue of 243 Million They made a profit of 76 Million They paid Auckland council a dividend of 51 Million Their overall return on equity was over 15% http://www.poal.co.nz/

Because if you are as small as NZ you have to lead by side-stepping your bigger competitors and playing a different game if you want to win. By win I mean get things like investment.   True story. A

I would be interested to know what the "life of the Tug" is.

The electric motors are not an issue as Steve states electric motors have been used for donkeys years and theoretically should last forever. The batteries however have a limited number of cycles and are an environmental problem to dispose of and produce.

The other issue I see is the cost of power in the future with it predicted to go up as demand increases and the supply of local natural gas dwindles. Is the 12 million return based on current power prices ?

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I would be interested to know what the "life of the Tug" is.

The electric motors are not an issue as Steve states electric motors have been used for donkeys years and theoretically should last forever. The batteries however have a limited number of cycles and are an environmental problem to dispose of and produce.

The other issue I see is the cost of power in the future with it predicted to go up as demand increases and the supply of local natural gas dwindles. Is the 12 million return based on current power prices ?

Even if the cost of power increases by 40% you are still ahead of the game according to the numbers I've seen. Give Meridian a guarantee and demand to sell power other than the smelter and there goes our power capacity for the next wee while.

 

Think of it in a different light, the Port has strong metrics that they have to meet from an environmental and energy point of view and this will assist them to get over the line.  

 

I think this is a great innovation. We can't just sit there and do nothing can we?  We as a Country need to innovate, prove that we can obtain more of GDP from things other than cows.  

 

My concern is that our cost of living and overheads of running a business in NZ are increasing which makes us less competitive than other Countries if we compete with low wage economies and therefore we are forced to move into the innovation market, otherwise we will remain a backwater Country. 

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hmm, I dont see it like that. Bleeding edge, risky....and with ratepayers funds. IMO

 

Agree with that comment. Like airbags when first invented and installed and front wheel drives in motor vehicles. First Electric motors in the catamarans which most over heated and caught fire. All had teething problems.

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No published specs on the tug (Bollard pull, endurance at load etc) or even a confirmation of price, recharge time, charge rate etc. It would be interesting. 

 

Sorry incorrect.

 

All those details are forecasted but not proven yet. Recharge time has been specified. Bollard pull is stated as  equal to their largest present tug in use. Price yes is dictated if no development hitches. What that has not been considered as far as operation costs, which falls into IT's criticism is that during the life time of the tug 2040 & 2050 if all countries follow suit and a large % like 80% of most fossil fuel power machinery, boats automotive vehicles are replaced with electric it is reasonable to assume that diesel and petrol prices will fall to a incredible cheap price. Their is no telling what electricity prices will be in ten .. 20 .. 30 years time. Perhaps Diesel and petrol will be 2/3rds of current $ prices.  P.O.A. expert took a number of years to persuade them it was possible after they where told it could not be done. He over came with his tech expertise all the no's they gave, threw at him to get them with their tech build experts to a workable viable in their opinion tug. What I would like to know in doing so did they get a agreement to have a share in the intellectual property ownership for the motor, thus royalties or % shareholding in a separate electric motor company for each additional future motor made including all Bollard pull and thrust power ratings / sizes.

 

Recharge time is 2 - 4  hours.

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I dont expect NZ, a country of 4 million to lead the world. Why should we be? Certainly not leading it in renewable power generation. Remember Aucklands electric bus. What an expensive joke that was. See the same for this folly. Why on earth do you want to lead the world in this.?

 

 

Agree re the electric buses, however if they have intellectual property ownership share and a share in the motor manufacturing company and the motor is a huge success then bingo. Imagine if ford had that attitude there would be no ford motor cars and possibly the combustion engine in cars could have delayed 20 or 30 years. Then perhaps motor vehicles could have advanced with water steam engines which in most countries there would be no pollution problem from them.

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Transpower isn't concerned about generation capacity at 40% ev uptake. NZ has plenty of generation capacity which can be boosted by peak smoothing with grid storage or local smoothing by putting a battery pack onsite to drop the grid demand and allow for offpeak charging

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I think what people conveniently forget is that the electricity has to come from somewhere,are we going to have to dam more rivers or burn more coal to produce it?

With increasing energy efficiency, my understanding was total power demand was 'stagnant', meaning power co's aren't selling any more power, despite increasing population, and can't expect growth in sales, because people are buying more energy efficient appliances.

 

Then, all you need is one paper mill to shut down, saving 3% of the national electricity consumption (which happened about 2012 I think), or some smelter down south to close down, saving 19% of national electric consumption, and the power co's margins and profit go out the window.

 

The power co's are weeing themselves with the prospect of EV's cause they are taking market share off the oil co's........growth in power sales at no cost to them...

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