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I actually left interior as is as far as adding anything, but like you, I will need a refit in a year or two and need to add lockers, shelves etc....If I did it all at once I'd end up like that Dane on Youtube 'SailLife' who does no sailing, just works and works and works on is boat....

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I bought some okume for a few jobs recently. Nice to work with, thought the grain on meranti splits off a bit easier when cutting. Pretty sure meranti used to be the cheap stuff, seems to be the other way round now. Used to get Fijian Kauri that was real nice, not sure if its around anymore. 

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18 minutes ago, Zozza said:

....If I did it all at once I'd end up like that Dane on Youtube 'SailLife' who does no sailing, just works and works and works on is boat....

Oh I hear ya. My absolute worst fear is becoming one of them which is why I made a conscious decision to stick with a small, manageable and affordable boat. I really enjoy working on boats but nowhere near as much as I enjoy sailing them.

I'm thinking I will approach the jobs in manageable chunks so it is never more than a months hard graft to get back in the water if I get sick of working on it.

Having the boat at home which is also my workplace should help me to keep the momentum going.

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21 minutes ago, Sabre said:

Oh I hear ya. My absolute worst fear is becoming one of them which is why I made a conscious decision to stick with a small, manageable and affordable boat. I really enjoy working on boats but nowhere near as much as I enjoy sailing them.

I'm thinking I will approach the jobs in manageable chunks so it is never more than a months hard graft to get back in the water if I get sick of working on it.

Having the boat at home which is also my workplace should help me to keep the momentum going.

Yuh, your driveway is generally the cheapest boatyard in town!

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There are 3 standards of Marine Ply's in NZ now. BS1088 2003, BS1088 2018 and AS/NZ2272, which is the same as the BS1088 2018 spec.
BS1088 originally was a standard for a Marine ply made from a non treated tropical hardwood. The Glue used had to meet a  Boil Proof (WPB) rating. Several types of Glues are used by different manufacturers and they must be able to with stand Boiling Water. There are other rules relating to the integrity of the Ply.
The latest 1088 2018 covers the following.
Face veneer quality

  • No more than 6 pin knots per square meter
  • No more than 2 closed splits per meter of panel width, with a total length of 200mm
  • No open splits
  • No more than 2 small worm holes per square metre
  • No fungal decay
  • Low contrast color variation
  • No repairs
  • Glue penetration is only allowed near the permitted defect. Area no more than 5% of the outer ply
  • Up to 5% sapwood is allowed
    Face veneer thickness
    • For 3mm ply, face veneer thickness should be 0.6-0.9mm
    • For 3.6mm ply, face veneer thickness should be 0.7-1.1mm
    • For ply thicker than 3.8mm, face veneer thickness should be more than 1.0m
    Core veneers
    • No limit on pin knots.
    • No limit on closed splits.
    • On 4 edges of the marine plywood sheet, each edge only allow maximum one open splits (core gap). The open split, if any, should not be more than 0.5mm.
    • Small wormholes are ok.
    • No limits on edge joints.
    • In the core, each square meter can not have more than 3 repairs.
    • Up to 5% sapwood is allowed.
      Maximum thickness to be 4.8mm
      • Adjacent plies to be laid with grains at the right angle.
      • Panels less than 6.5mm should have at least 3 plies.
      • Panels more than 6.5mm should have at least 5 plies.
      • Center veneers can be two veneers glued together with their grains in same direction.

      Must not have core gaps, overlaps, pleats, blisters, hollows, bumps or imprints
      For standard Marine Ply, the density of timber species should be greater than 500 kgs per cubic meters. Fungal resistance rating class 3 or better.
      For lightweight ply, The density of timber species should be less than 500 kgs per cubic meters. Fungal resistance rating class 4 or better.

      Panel Construction requires adjacent plies to be laid with their grain at right angles. Minimum of 3 plys for panels less than 6.5mm thick. Minimum of 5 plies for panels thicker than 6.5mm. Not less than 40% of the grain and not more than 65% of the grain can run in any one direction. The panel is to be built with veneers on either side of its center line matched in thickness, timber type, cutting method, and grain direction. The center veneer can be made up of two veneers glued together with their grain running in the same direction. Must not have core gaps (but see above under core veneers permitted defects) overlaps, pleats, blisters, hollows, bumps or imprints.

      • must have a moisture content between 6% and 14% when it leaves the factory.

      The BS1088-1:2003 requires the following infomation to be included.

      • BS1088-1:2003 UNBALANCED (if the panel is constructed in an unbalanced way.
      • TREATED if any rot treatment has been applied.
      • The nominal panel thickness
      • Manufacturers name or mark
      • Country of manufacture
      • Panel type, standard or light weight
      • Name of the timber species

      e.g. BS 1088-1:2003 MARINE/3.6mm/MD/Malaysia/LW/Gaboon

      The RNZAF once required BS1088 grade ply. At that time, it was supplied by Placemakers. They were out of 1088 stocks, but had the exact same ply in stock, just without the stamp. So they got a stamp sent across from Nelson Branch and had the ply stamped by hand in their store.

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5 hours ago, Dtwo said:

That would directly contradict the advice I got from Gunnersen's.  I went with their recommendations.

They know their products and market that well they went bust.

My Uncle made most of the ply used in NZ for many years. He sold his company years ago but it is still making ply just under a different name and without as much 'exotic' timber options, now mostly they just use weed wood, pine.

3 hours ago, lateral said:

No doubt there is product out there that meets BS1088 but haven’t paid for the endorsement. Equally there may be product out there that has a counterfeit stamp.

About 10 (?) years ago someone in NZ made a BS1088 stamp but they got busted eventually. 

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