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New toy in Auckland...


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2 minutes ago, Steve said:

Yes. And it was blowing. I think if you had the depth, keel down might be easier. 
But not that bad really. 

Backwards is easier than forwards... going forwards, with the keel up when going slow, the bow is blown off almost instantly (not helped by the transfer of mass aft which further reduces lateral plane forward of the mast). It's no place for fainthearted helming or manoeuvring.

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That is one cool boat, just the sort of modern but practical design suited to NZ sailing.

FOB. Seen this weekend...

Yes, as long as the internal structure has been built appropriately to accomodate the loads that it will be subjected to. Plus that the board doesn't retract into the hull gives more room internally a

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9 hours ago, RushMan said:

Shaggybaxter from SA hit a whale, the keel popped, no damage other than a whale looking for Panadol.  Reset the keel and continued their sailing.

From his account the system works

 

Interesting and encouraging, but then all impacts differ - glancing blows, speed of impact, immediate stop or less violent etc. No boat can survive anything that could happen. I like the Pogo's, and as I said above, I'd consider one if I ha the $$

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12 hours ago, Island Time said:

Indeed, however the pressure induced by a solid keel impact, will create a shock, transmitted back thru the lift mechanism.

In a severe impact it's likely to break the ram mounting points as the pressure cannot be released through a valve sufficiently quickly - fluid is not compressible etc. This issue may be designed in, with a "fuse" in the system to allow the keel to be pressed up as part of the shock absorption design... or not.

I know with my (non) ballasted swing keel(s) that they lift very easily when the bottom gets too close, They also will hold you in place for shortish periods and if the aft one is in the mud as well you don't swing.  Rather like lowering a spud or 2 as they do on dredging and mooring inspection barges.

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23 hours ago, Island Time said:

One of the issues that can be seen with that type on some vessels Steve, is that when sailing fast, if not locked down, the water pressure can move them aft, changing the boat's handling....

Luckily perhaps, Gwalarn doesn't do fast, at least by todays standards. I Have seen 9 knots for a second or two while surfing. Average cruising speed for all ocean passages to date has been 4.5 knots.

I change the handling by raising or lowering the aft board and raising the primary board when running downwind.

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1 minute ago, Steve Pope said:

Luckily perhaps, Gwalarn doesn't do fast, at least by todays standards. I Have seen 9 knots for a second or two while surfing. Average cruising speed for all ocean passages to date has been 4.5 knots.

I change the handling by raising or lowering the aft board and raising the primary board when running downwind.

It would be great if that was legal while racing.  The weight would shift aft nicely.  

If only we could then push the keel forward for light airs as well and get those big bums out of the water. (and make it legal of course)

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46 minutes ago, Steve said:

It would be great if that was legal while racing.  The weight would shift aft nicely.  

If only we could then push the keel forward for light airs as well and get those big bums out of the water. (and make it legal of course)

Both my boards are unballasted (20mm alluminium plate) so they don't alter the weight distribution when lifted. All ballast (lead) is in the hull below the water tank.

The original "Trismus" drawings had a dagger board in the forefoot as well as the primary and aft lifting ones. It didn't make it into the eventual design though.

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1 hour ago, Steve said:

It would be great if that was legal while racing.  The weight would shift aft nicely.  

If only we could then push the keel forward for light airs as well and get those big bums out of the water. (and make it legal of course)

Surely if you declare movable ballast on your handicap, it is legal?

Canting keels and water ballast are all forms of this. You may get penalised excessively by the handicap rating, but if its declared surely it is legal?

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Just now, Fish said:

Surely if you declare movable ballast on your handicap, it is legal?

Canting keels and water ballast are all forms of this. You may get penalised excessively by the handicap rating, but if its declared surely it is legal?

Bit of a fine line between movable ballast and a lifting keel I guess.

I think it's probably a bit of a hangover from the trailer yacht days when pulling the board up off the wind on your 780 was an advantage but also bloody scary at times.  Now, in most SI's you will see that all keels must be in the locked down position for the duration of the race.  Canters have a separate rule.  Bit of a pity as I see an advantage there waiting to be exploited.  

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