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Mast Post Insert


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I’ve removed top block that the compression post slots into on the roof of my cabin. 
 

The block is mainly used for the mast foot base on the outside to screw through into. There had been a leak at some point and the block was cracking and looking a bit dodgy. The block has a 5mm recess that the top of the compression post fits into. 
 

After driving round town today to all the specialist timber places, I’m told it’s Mahogany. Unfortunately the size I need (115mm square by about 20-25mm thick) is too small for them to bother with. 
 

Does anyone know of a place on Christchurch that can supply small quantity of Mahogany, or in fact do I really have to stick with that type of wood? I’m not fussed about how it looks because I can just paint it anyway. I have access to a lot of quality fence post/Pauling type timber but being that it serves a pretty important purpose I don’t want to make a mistake.

thanks!

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Needs to be hardwood. It's a compression post, and transfers the rig loads to the keel, so the cabin top does not take it. If the rig is still in, and properly tuned, taking it out should be difficult, and the cabin top is not notmally designed to take this load alone. Even sitting on the hard or in the water....

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Next door to us it one of the best rubbish bins in NZ, it sits outside a place that does superboat woodwork. A rummage can often find a pile of treasures inc mahogany's and teak in a range of sizes and shapes.

I shall go dumpster diving for you tomorrow. I'm 95% sure I'll find something.

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4 minutes ago, Island Time said:

Needs to be hardwood. It's a compression post, and transfers the rig loads to the keel, so the cabin top does not take it. If the rig is still in, and properly tuned, taking it out should be difficult, and the cabin top is not notmally designed to take this load alone. Even sitting on the hard or in the water....

It’s a trailer sailer....

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11 minutes ago, aardvarkash10 said:

engineering plastic.  Doesn't look as nice, but its abundant, cheap and doesn't rot.

Good call dude.

I have some umpy stuff, not entirely sure what it is, that fullers have on wharves so the gangplanks slide nice and quietly. It machines up quite nicely yet seems pretty firm.

A grey colour and I'm going to say 12mm think. I have a big section of it so could send 2 bits, thinking if you need 20mm thick one won't do it.

That work for you?

Guess where I got it from? Yeap, the dumpster of ongoing giving :)

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Looks like your 'ask the audience' call is saying PM me an address for the courier.

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Just had a suss and the plastic is 10mm thick. I've got about a 1.5sq/m bit of it not in use so plenty for you. 

But I also found what I think maybe Turpentine. 91mm x 48mm x 300 odd long. The stuff is harder than hammers. Would that be of any use?

I am a wee bit of a hoarder when talking handy bits of weird wood and other such bits. They come in very handy for the small things like this. In fact I used some to rebuild the mast base on the 930.

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Key KM possibly that might work. Harry got me thinking too, there’s a building demolition recycler a block down from work. I’m working from home tomorrow so I’ll go suss them on Friday and if no luck I’ll fire you a PM. 
 

I knew the brains trust would have an answer!

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18 minutes ago, KM... said:

Good call dude.

 

Yeah I have used it a lot in the past - slide pucks for when I was downhill longboarding, levelling heavy equipment installations, replacing crap sliding door runners at home.  Its incredibly useful, cheap, easy to machine comes in a zillion colours, doesn't rot, self lubricating.  Bloody great stuff.

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Just to be pedantic.

Be careful of the "chopping board" solution. Some use them for backing fittings, and they often slowly migrate from the load. depends what they are made from. There are plastics that can do this, semi crystalline engineering thermoplastics, but you need the right one. 

You'd probably get away with it though!

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