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https://www.sailing....lregs/index.phphttps://www.sailing.org/specialregs

Just make cat 1 optional for cruisers. Racing is dying here anyway.

Can't be done. The Governing administrators control all racing. Try and hold a race without being affiliated to YNZ or World sailing federation and see how far you get. Been tried here and in Australia. 

World Sailing Offshore Special Regulations
The World Sailing Offshore Special Regulations (OSR) govern offshore racing for monohulls and multihulls, structural features, yacht equipment, personal equipment and training.
The OSR is republished every two years and the latest edition is for 2018-2019 with updates January 2019. You can download it either in full or by category and view the interpretations of the World Sailing Special Regulations Sub-Committee below.

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https://www.sailing.org/specialregs.  

 

 https://www.sailing.org/documents/offshorespecialregs/index.php      

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Rehab, please take this as a positive comment but many of your posts are close to unintelligible. Please work on formatting, sentence construction, spelling and grammar. It would make it much easier

This is off the topic and belongs in the race talk thread.   http://crew.org.nz/forum/index.php/topic/17122-golden-globe-race/

From the Golden Globe Race Committee: Imo. relevant to Cat 1 and if taken with a dose of common sense could / should make cat 1 redundant   The changes to the notice of race may surprise many. We do

You can't be serious.

 

Do not need to ponder. 

 

A question for you FISH to ponder = have you ever sailed long distances on international ocean waters? 

 

A raft a 55ft lightweight  tri. The southern Ocean would have smashed it into little pieces in a very short time. A small swell smashed it's newly repaired NZ centre board reaching in 16 kts winds speeds. I been on a 70 ft wooden tri in the tropics that a 3 meter swell smashed the under wing deck, lockers and tore the fibre glassing from the opposite port hull. They where going to take the southern ocean route despite leading me to believe we were not and that we were taking a direct route to TAHITI as I as navigator and the only person that qualified for Cat 1 with previous off shore experience and restricted radio licence and celestial navigation abilities. Two days before leaving three wise men in three piece suits who I have never met or seen before casually came and stood next to me as I was admiring Sir Mike big boat at the viaduct basin and said to me that my decision to go direct to the Atolll was the correct decision and not to go into the southern Ocean without introducing themselves or leading in with some small talk. They must have known that the captain was going to take the southern ocean route despite lying to me he was not.  I thanked them for reinforcing my insight / decision and they quietly walked away with small smiles and nods. We departed and I went to my cabin to get a nap before my watch thinking the captain was sailing to my programmed chart plotter agreed course. Some 1 to 2 hours latter something woke me to discover we were sailing south and not north east as per chart plotter course. Asked the helmsman what are you doing, reply we are going down to the southern Ocean. I called the skipper to put into Whitianga or call a helicopter as no way was I going to the southern ocean after viewing the weather from Freemantle to the cape for months and weather being my forte. He pondered for a moment and told the helmsman to alter course and steer as per chart plotter course. Consequently I stayed on board as if he had put into Whitianga and I left the vessel he would breaking regulations and there would have been no person on board with experience or Skills in accordance with the NZ regs. It is quite easy making sane and logical decisions. Why do the modern life rafts and most authorities recommend double insulated life raft floors for non tropical waters rather than single floor, which does not include the southern ocean temperatures, How long do you think one would survive in a dry suit submerged in the southern ocean waters waiting for weather conditions to prevail for a rescue attempt if the E.P.I.R.B. did not mal function. I have been in seas not as big as the southern ocean waves just east off cook strait 50 ft height 90 kts plus wind speeds and I know there power / force and if there is a better way I have learnt to take it with all available means at one disposal and not rely on others to come forth and aid. I would probably guess correctly that if both off us was in a southern ocean storm and I called for assistance you would not respond.

Never mind Rehad,

The point I'm making has gone way over you head.

 

Everything you describe outlines how you had freedom to make you own decisions. Prescriptive safety regulations take away one's freedom to make your own decisions, and also to take responsibility for the decisions. Steve Pope's (the OP in this part of the thread) posted the GGR committee comments that outline an aspect of this, that external third parties are not in a position to dictate what is best for someone in a particular situation. As such, the GGR committee is stating that those who suffer the consequences of their decisions (i.e. sailing into the Southern Ocean) should be the ones to decide how to plan for, manage and survive the risks of the Southern Ocean. This is possibly why Steve's post got so many 'up votes'...

 

Relying on prescriptive lists from third parties to avoid needing to make decisions for yourself or to manage your own risk is about as effective as Tits on a Bull, but Steve's post put it a little more eloquently.

 

Have a great day.

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Id say rather than dying, its being killed.

 

Plenty of keen people, plenty of capable boats, not enough funds to meet the 'rules'.

There is a lot of truth in this statement.

 

YNZ would do well to understand what is behind this. I don't believe the current safety requirements are relevant to the modern situation on the water. They are not based on an industry (as in commercial industry / construction industry) best practice risk assessment model. They are based on prescriptive lists of what were very good ideas about 30, 40 or 50 years ago. Shite, even the improvements since the '98 Hobart are significant (and not because of it). Improvements in weather forecast accuracy, reliability, access to and cost of GPS, chart based nav systems, AIS and SARTs, I could go on and on. Boat construction, rescue helicopter coverage, satellite phone comms. This all serves to reduce the underlying risks confronted in an effective yacht racing risk assessment.

 

This needs to be reflected in the relaxing of the various category requirements, so that it is easier and cheaper to go sailing.

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There is a lot of truth in this statement.

 

YNZ would do well to understand what is behind this. I don't believe the current safety requirements are relevant to the modern situation on the water. They are not based on an industry (as in commercial industry / construction industry) best practice risk assessment model. They are based on prescriptive lists of what were very good ideas about 30, 40 or 50 years ago. Shite, even the improvements since the '98 Hobart are significant (and not because of it). Improvements in weather forecast accuracy, reliability, access to and cost of GPS, chart based nav systems, AIS and SARTs, I could go on and on. Boat construction, rescue helicopter coverage, satellite phone comms. This all serves to reduce the underlying risks confronted in an effective yacht racing risk assessment.

 

This needs to be reflected in the relaxing of the various category requirements, so that it is easier and cheaper to go sailing.

I tend to agree with Clipper. I bought my boat with the key aim of doing RNI2020 with lots of learning along the way. By way of background I started sailing when I was six and it is very much my lifetime hobby. I started with a realistic expectations of what upgrades, training and gear was needed to be obtained or borrowed to get the boat to the start line but a reassessment recently indicated it was at least the thick end of 30,000.00 to get there with a smaller cheaper boat. Being based in the South Island didn't help the budget.

I understand the race rules and the specific safety instructions that strongly encourage and also caution potential competitors. These are all borne out through experience and external risk drivers.

 

Unfortunately, I arrived at the conclusion somewhat painfully I couldn't get my budget to where it needed to be-it was simply to expensive in both budget and time. I'm sure I'm not alone ,but cruising Rakiura is looking good at this point!

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Already commented on heavy fire extingushers and the almanac for short coastal Cat 3 races. As usefull as an ash tray .

 

There is more clutter.

 

Throwing rope. Why would I go down below to try and find it when we have dozen sheets on deck that does the job just fine. Practice this skill with our kids all the time.

 

Fire blanket. The bucket will always be my first choice in a fire. Plus we dont have cooking facilty on our boat.

 

Depth sounder. By the time the depth reads too shallow it will be too late to turn, we rely on Navionics raising the boards and a visual on bow. The depth sounder is put away like christmass lights.

 

Hacksaw blades why so many? When I was a kid they used to be very britlle but that was 30+ years ago now.They just rust at the bottom of the tool box. 

 

I do like having the inspection a week before the CC. Wouldnt want a failed spot inspection on the finish line or invert the rig becasue we didnt know about the inner forestay. The debate with the inspector is worth every cent.

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Freedom, im amused by some of the concerns you have.

 

I agree re fire equipmdnt on a wet cat, happy with all my extinguishers on the drier keelboat with many possible sources of fire though.

 

Hacksaw blades - if you have fibre rigging, not much point for cutting rigging, but great for onboard repairs. Ive broken a prod during a race, hacksawed it shorter and refitted so could carry on. Broke 4 blades doing it. I carry a cordless grinder on the keeler to attempt to cut rod rigging if i had issues.

 

Throw ropes are great. In my opinion better than a horseshoe (I believe lifebuoys are a waste of time). On voom i had 2 throwropes, one inside each hatch for quick access. We used to use them to rescue kayakers when we were white water kayaking, much better than a tangled, stiff jib sheet.

 

Couldnt agree more on depthsounders though. They were once an important navigation tool. Today, not so much.

 

Nearly everything we require is justifiable at some level, but will be pointless on a different boat. There appears to be a lot of arse covering in society today and our race requirements are because of that. So my comment was. not aimed at YNZ particularly. More society in general I guess.

 

It appears we need separate rules for multihulls perhaps?

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