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Cyclades 43


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#1 Frank

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 05:40 AM

Morning all, longtime listener , first time caller here, I've been sailing 40 yrs coastal mostly.

Have done 3 pacific trips on a Ganley Stratos, not mine. I'm looking to do more of these trips on my own boat eventually. So to that point any comments on the suitability of a Beneteau Cyclades 43 for offshore cruising, good bones ? I think the sailing Vagabonde team had one for a while.

Thanks

Frank

 


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#2 Jon

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 05:26 PM

Frank
Firstly buyer be ware
Most of this range were built to go straight into the charter market
This is a good thing as they are designed to be easily sailed by many
The down side is they are easily sailed by many
So if you can find one that's well looked after and hasn't been used as a bumper boat then they are capable enough for cruising but they weren't ever designed to high end.
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The best sailors do it two handed

#3 Frank

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 07:09 PM

Thanks Jon !


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#4 Frank

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 08:04 PM

UPDATE: I recently viewed a Bavaria 38 of 2000 vintage, I had a good look in the bilge area.

 I noticed the moulded transverse floors were much deeper in section than the Beneteau of similar length and vintage. The overall Top Hat (TH)  section of the former just struck me as substantially bigger all round. Another surprise was that the "Egg Crate" structural grid did not seem to be continuous between the floors allowing for the lower flanges of the TH sections to be "tabbed" onto the hull . I'm not sure if this is factory standard or not, but If so is then it strikes me as being stronger, more easily repaired and more damage tolerant than the Beneteau, granted  one should not make too much of a judgement on only two boats.


Edited by Frank, 10 July 2017 - 08:09 PM.

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#5 island time

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 08:08 PM

Some of the older Bavarias were not great sailers, if your serious about that one, whose the designer on that model?
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There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing, as simply messing about in boats


#6 Frank

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 05:52 PM

Some of the older Bavarias were not great sailers, if your serious about that one, whose the designer on that model?

I know what you mean,this one was never in charter, it has a deepish bulb keel and a fairly decent rig/sailplan, it looks like it would go OK. Not sure if its cast iron or lead in the keel though. In anycase I'm looking at something else for now.


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#7 Frank

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 05:54 PM

Some of the older Bavarias were not great sailers, if your serious about that one, whose the designer on that model?

Designer was J and J Design , never heard of them.


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#8 island time

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 06:02 PM

http://jnj.design/
They have done lots of boats for mainstream builders. None of them particularly great performers as far as I can see. Iirc that's why bavaria more recently went to the Farr office....
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